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Tassajara Prep Charter High School Revised Charter Petition Appendices 8-1-2011

PDF of document available here.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Amendments

The Board may propose amendments to this charter for approval by the Chartering Authority. Material
revisions and amendments shall be made pursuant to the standards, criteria, and timelines in Education
Code Section 47605.

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APPENDIX A – DRAFT ATTENDANCE POLICY

STUDENT ATTENDANCE
A. Excused Absences for Classroom Based Attendance
Absence from Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) shall be excused only for health reasons,
family emergencies and justifiable personal reasons, as permitted by law or Tri-Valley Learning
Corporation (―TVLC‖).

1. A student’s absence shall be excused for the following reasons:
a. Personal illness;
b. Quarantine under the direction of a county or city health officer;
c. Medical, dental, optometric, or chiropractic appointments;
d. Attendance at funeral services for a member of the immediate family: “Immediate family” shall
be defined as mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, brother, sister or any relative living in the
student’s immediate household;
e. Participation in religious instruction or exercises in accordance with the TPHS Family-Student
Handbook: In such instances, the student shall attend at least the minimum school day. The
student shall be excused for this purpose on no more than four school days per year.
2. In addition, a student’s absence shall be excused for justifiable personal reasons. Advance written
request by the parent/guardian and approval of the principal or designee shall be required for absences
for:
a. Appearance in court;
b. Attendance at a funeral;
c. Observation of a holiday or ceremony of his/her religion;
d. Attendance at religious retreats for no more than four days during a year.

B. Method of Verification
When students who have been absent return to school, they must present a satisfactory explanation
verifying the reason for the absence. The following methods may be used to verify student absences:

1. Written note from parent/guardian, parent representative, or student if 18 or older.
2. Conversation, in person or by telephone, between the verifying employee and the student’s
parent/guardian or parent representative. The employee shall subsequently record the following:
a. Name of student;
b. Name of parent/guardian or parent representative;
c. Name of verifying employee;
d. Date or dates of absence;
e. Reason for absence.
3. Visit to the student’s home by the verifying employee, or any other reasonable method, which
establishes the fact that the student was absent for the reasons stated. A written recording shall be
made, including information outlined above.
4. Physician’s verification:
a. When excusing students for confidential medical services or verifying such appointments, school
staff shall not ask the purpose of such appointments but may contact a medical office to confirm
the time of the appointment;
b. When a student has had 14 absences in the school year for illness verified by methods listed in
#1-#3 above, any further absences for illness must be verified by a physician.

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5. Insofar as class participation is an integral part of students’ learning experiences, parents/guardians
and students shall be encouraged to schedule medical appointments during non-school hours.
6. Students should not be absent from school without their parents/guardians’ knowledge or consent
except in cases of medical emergency.
7. Student absence for religious instruction or participation in religious exercises away from school
property may be considered excused subject to the details in the handbook.

C. Unexcused Absences / Truancy for Classroom Based Attendance
The Principal, or designee, shall implement positive steps to reduce truancy. Students who are habitual
truants or habitually insubordinate or disorderly during attendance at School may be referred to the
appropriate law enforcement agency.

A student’s grades may be affected by excessive unexcused absences in accordance with TVLC policy.
Students shall be classified as truant if absent from school without a valid excuse five full days in one
school year, or tardy or absent for more than any 30-minute period during the school day without a valid
excuse on three occasions in one school year, or any combination thereof. Such students shall be reported
to the Principal. The parent/guardian of a student classified as a truant shall be notified in writing of the
following:

1. The student is truant;
2. The parent/guardian is obligated to compel the student to attend school;
3. The parent/guardian who fails to meet this obligation may be guilty of an infraction of the law and
subject to prosecution;
4. The parent/guardian has the right to meet with appropriate school personnel to discuss solutions to the
student’s truancy;
5. A habitual truant along with his/her parents/guardians will participate in a meeting with the Principal.
The purpose of the meeting is to address the truancy issue and to establish a plan to reduce and
eliminate the truancy problem. If such problem persists, the Principal has the authority to take
disciplinary action against the student, which may include a recommendation of expulsion.

D. Reports
The Principal, or designee, shall gather and transmit to the TVLC Board the number of truancy cases, the
plans on file and any disciplinary actions taken if applicable.

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APPENDIX B – ACADEMIC PROGRAM
TPHS Academic Program
The academic program is central to reaching the mission and vision of the school. This entire section is
dedicated to explaining ―how‖ we will reach the mission and vision through our academic program.
Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) shall focus on the education of the whole student through a
core curriculum of English-language arts, mathematics, science, and history-social science including an
enriching curriculum of visual and performing arts, physical education, foreign language, technology and
life skills education.

The use of integrated curriculum will allow students to extend learning through language arts,
mathematics, visual and performing arts, science, social studies, technology and other enrichment
opportunities. Topics will be studied from many different angles and viewpoints, allowing students to
explore subjects deeply, employ higher level thinking skills, and make connections among various
disciplines of thought.

To better achieve the vision and mission, the TPHS curriculum will be structured into the four academic
emphases listed below, which share a common set of research-based instructional strategies. Students
entering 10th grade will declare an academic emphasis. Their declaration will be based upon work
developed through student interest and guidance from parents.

   Sustainability
   Visual & Performing Arts
   Applied Technology
   Entrepreneurship

A student may apply to change their declared academic emphasis. At such time a conference with the
parents and student will be initiated to determine the appropriate next steps. Any change of the declared
emphasis approved after 10th grade may require additional academic work.

Curriculum and Content
TPHS recognizes the importance of ensuring that a standards-based curriculum program is in place and
regularly evaluated for effectiveness. In order to create this program, ―Backward Design,‖ a research-
based instructional design method currently being employed in reform efforts across the nation, will be
employed by the school. Originally published in ―Understanding by Design,‖ by Grant Wiggins and Jay
McTighe, this process of instructional planning provides teachers with a method for aligning standards,
assessment, and instruction.

This process is one in which teachers start with the desired results (goals or standards) – and then derive
the curriculum from the evidence of learning (performances) called for by the standard and the teaching
needed to equip students to perform. There are three distinct stages of this process that TPHS will use.
The three stages are as follows:

Stage 1: Unpacking and Prioritizing State Content Standards
Teachers and administrators will apply specific tools necessary to ―unpack‖ and prioritize content
standards. This is a necessary pre-requisite step to effectively designing assessments that are aligned to
standards. Specifically, teachers will:

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   Understand the three steps of the backward design process (identifying desired results, designing and
aligning assessments to those results, differentiating instruction to meet the needs of all learners);
   Apply a concrete process for analyzing standards which helps teachers internalize the standards as
well as determine the following information:

   Level of thinking (based on Bloom’s Taxonomy) required by students to reach mastery of the
standard (this will be tied to creating assessments);
   Percentage of questions from the standardized exams that relate to each strand of the standards
(this will be tied to creating assessments);
   Identification of standards that will serve as ―anchors‖ upon which units can be based. Other
standards are tied to these ―anchor‖ standards within each unit designed by teachers (this will be
tied to creating assessments for units as well as individual lessons within the unit);

Stage 2: Aligning Assessments (formative and summative) to content standards
Teachers will design effective assessments that are aligned to standards and provide an accurate measure
of a student’s ability to engage in the level of thinking that is required by each standard. Specifically,
teachers will:

   Identify four overarching assessment methods (selected response, constructed response, performance
assessment, and personal communication) from which to choose when designing standards-based
assessments (both formative and summative);
   Analyze content standards to determine the ―achievement target‖ embedded within each standard
(achievement targets are the link between standards and assessment);
   Match an appropriate assessment method to each standard;
   Establish and articulate clear criteria for reaching proficient performance on standards;

Stage 3: Differentiating Instruction to Meet the Needs of All Learners
Teachers will design innovative instructional strategies by:

   Differentiating the content, process, and products delivered to students in order to provide equal
access to standards-based education for all learners (including English language learners and students
with special needs);
   Writing effective standards-based lesson plans;
   Exploring how all learners (including ELLs and special needs students) vary in their readiness,
interests and learning profiles;
   Using a repertoire of research-based instructional strategies proven to increase student achievement in
a standards-based system (e.g., latest research from Marzano, Pickering, Pollock, Schmoker,
Tomlinson, etc.);
   Creating learning experiences that promote understanding, interest, and excellence;
   Innovating and enhancing current standards-based adopted programs;

As a result of implementing and using this process, educational objectives become the criteria by which
materials are selected, content is outlined, instructional procedures are developed, and tests and
examinations are prepared. TPHS teachers will use the process on a continual basis to evaluate the
effectiveness of materials and instructional strategies used in their classrooms. Thus, the process will
serve as the vehicle for ongoing conversations among and between grade levels and departments at TPHS.
Specifically, department teams will be charged with the responsibility of meeting weekly to engage in
lesson study and the examination of student work in order to critically examine lessons to determine their

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effectiveness. See the ―Assessment of Student Outcomes‖ section for detailed information regarding the
process teachers will use to examine student work and reflect upon lesson efficacy.

Teachers will be trained on the method outlined above by qualified individuals whose accomplishments
include training schools on this process at the national level. TPHS will maintain ongoing conversations
with Insight Education Group, Inc., an educational consulting firm specializing in professional
development, comprehensive school reform — including work as an approved SAIT (School Assistance
and Intervention Team) provider — and charter development.

Student Needs and Instructional Strategies

Overview
TPHS understands that the academic program for students must be able to accommodate the needs of
learners at all levels. In order to accommodate the needs of students whose academic achievement is
below grade level, and in order to close the achievement gap of our students, TPHS will incorporate a
strategic intervention program within the school day. This program will provide additional instructional
minutes for students struggling to achieve in Reading/Language Arts and Mathematics. Students who are
identified for intervention (based on test scores, academic performance, and teacher observations) will be
provided with an intervention course. This course will address basic reading and mathematics instruction,
while serving to supplement the classroom program. TPHS is firmly committed to enabling all students
at the school to succeed. We believe that implementing intervention programs within the school day are
the most appropriate and efficient way to ensure growth in the core content areas.

All coursework will involve a rich repertoire of instructional strategies, curriculum, and materials. Many
of the sample instructional strategies listed below incorporate one or more of the nine research-based
strategies proven to have a positive effect on student learning as described in Classroom Instruction that
Works (Marzano, Pickering, Pollock, 2001). Sample instructional strategies will include:

   Project based learning and other ways of experiencing real-world problems
   Collaborative investigations and demonstrations
   Mini-lessons that address specific skills within the context of larger projects
   Giving guidance and adequate time to self-reflect and self-assess
   Democratic classrooms and school structure
   Authentic assessments
   Direct instruction
   Research-based projects
   Cooperative group work and projects
   Inter-disciplinary approaches to curriculum
   The presentation of clearly defined ―Learning Targets‖ for all students by all teachers
   Rubric self-assessment
   The involvement of community members and educational partners in instructional presentation
   Mentoring program
   Peer study groups

The section that follows details three key instructional strategies that will be at the core of the TPHS
academic program. These strategies will be a primary focus of the school because they are among the
most effective ways to meet the needs of diverse learners (see below for citations of relevant research).
All of the strategies listed below will be supported by high quality professional development. Relevant

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professional development topics may include: cooperative learning, flexible grouping, project based
learning and service-learning, and the theory and practice of multiple intelligences.

Key Strategy #1: Multiple Intelligences
Teachers will ―structure the presentation of material in a style which engages most or all of the
intelligences. For example, when teaching about the revolutionary war, a teacher can show students battle
maps, play revolutionary war songs, organize a role play of the signing of the Declaration of
Independence, and have the students read a novel about life during that period. Teaching in this manner
can facilitate a deeper understanding of the subject material and activate a wide assortment of
intelligences in the students.‖ (Brualdi, A.C. 2000. Multiple Intelligences; ERIC Publication ED410226).
A recent Project Zero study of the application of multiple intelligence theory in the classroom found that
―MI helps schools in several ways. It offers a vocabulary for teachers to use in discussing children’s
strengths and in developing curriculum; it validates the practices of teachers whose work is already
synchronous with MI theory; it promotes or justifies education in diverse art forms; and it encourages
teachers to work in teams, complementing their own strengths with those of their colleagues.‖
(www.pz.harvard.edu/Research/MISchool.htm)

Key

Strategy #2: Project Based Learning
A key instructional approach to meeting a variety of student needs is standards-based Project Based
Learning (PBL). Standards-focused PBL is a “systematic teaching method that engages students in
learning knowledge and skills through an extended inquiry process structured around complex, authentic
questions and carefully designed products and tasks.‖ Research shows that students engaged in PBL
―construct solutions, thus shifting the emphasis [from the product] toward the process of learning‖ (Buck
Institute for Education, 2004. www.bie.org/pbl/pblhandbook/intro.php).

Project

based units will reflect the principles of backward design – the project content and processes will
be framed by an essential question that is aligned to standards. Students will be assessed for their mastery
of those standards, as well as their ability to solve problems individually and in cooperative groups.
Furthermore, all projects will reflect the ―6 A’s‖ of high quality PBL:

Authenticity
 Is the problem or question meaningful to the student?
 Is the problem or question one that an adult might tackle at work or in the community?
 Does the project provide the students with opportunities to be creative and to apply personal or social
value beyond school?

Academic Rigor
 Does the project allow students to acquire and apply knowledge related to more than one content
area?
 Are ways of using research methods from one or more disciplines incorporated in the project?
 Do students develop higher order thinking skills?

Applied Learning
 Do students solve a problem that is related to real world experiences?
 Are organizational skills and self-management prominent in the project?
 Does the project allow students to develop skills that are expected in the work place?

Active Exploration
 Is a significant amount of time spent doing field based work?
 Are various methods, media and sources used to conduct investigation?

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Adult Relationships
 Is there contact with an adult who has relevant expertise or experience?
 Are students working closely with adults?
 Is there collaboration between adults and students on the design and assessment of projects?

Assessment
 Do students use project criteria to gauge what they are learning?
 Do adults from outside the classroom help students develop real-world standards?
 Is student work assessed regularly though methods such as portfolios?

Key Strategy #3: Service-Learning / Community Action Projects
Productive citizens of the 21st century must be able to actively engage in their communities as agents of
positive change. Furthermore, research suggests that high-quality, classroom-based service learning is tied
to improved attendance, academic motivation, achievement, and decreased drop-out and truancy rates
(Billig, S 1999. The Impacts of Service-Learning on Youth, Schools, and Communities: Research on K-12
School-Based Service-Learning, 1990-1999. www.learningindeed.org)

Students

at TPHS will participate in a variety of activities designed to develop their ethic of service, and
their knowledge of the structure and function of surrounding communities. They will also be taught
explicit skills for contributing positively to the communities that touch their lives. Furthermore,
community members (business leaders, policy makers, nonprofit workers, etc.) will be invited into the
school to share their knowledge and expertise.

Community action projects will reflect the best practices of service learning, as defined by Youth Service
California (www.yscal.org):

Integrated

Learning
 The service-learning project has clearly articulated knowledge, skill or value goals that arise from
broader classroom or school goals.
 The service informs the academic learning content, and the academic learning content informs the
service.
 Life skills learned outside the classroom are integrated back into classroom learning.

High Quality Service
 The service responds to an actual community need that is recognized by the community.
 The service is age-appropriate and well organized.
 The service is designed to achieve significant benefits for students and community.

Collaboration
 The service-learning project is a collaboration among as many of these partners as is feasible:
students, parents, community-based organization staff, school administrators, teachers, and service
recipients.
 All partners benefit from the project and contribute to its planning.

Student Voice
Students participate actively in:

   Choosing and planning the service project;
   Planning and implementing the reflection sessions, evaluation, and celebration;
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   Taking on roles and tasks that are appropriate for their age.

Civic Responsibility
 The service-learning project promotes students’ responsibility to care for others and to contribute to
the community.
 By participating in the service-learning project, students understand how they can impact their
community.

Reflection
 Reflection establishes connections between students’ service experiences and the academic
curriculum.
 Reflection occurs before, during, and after the service-learning project.

Evaluation
 All the partners, especially students, are involved in evaluating the service-learning project.
 The evaluation seeks to measure progress toward the learning and service goals of the project.

Assessment of Student Outcome Goals
As has been previously described, TPHS will incorporate a high-quality, standards-based educational
program at all grade levels. Student performance will be measured via several assessment methods,
specifically based upon the assessment program created and researched by Richard J. Stiggins, author of
Student Involved Classroom Assessment, 3rded., 2001. Stiggins’ work is based on the idea that effective
assessment must directly correspond to specific achievement targets that have been made apparent to
students as part of the instructional program. This method has been included based on proven successful
use in secondary educational settings, and includes such assessments as selected response, essays,
performances, and products.

Each student will have an individual plan that outlines educational objectives and instructional strategies
that are appropriate to the particular student. Individual plans will be based on students’ learning styles
and thorough diagnostics of the students’ academic abilities. Instructional design will address identified
needs of all students, including students with special needs and gifted students, to facilitate high academic
achievement levels according to the California content standards.

Student growth and learning will be documented through portfolios and quarterly report cards. Each
student will develop a cumulative portfolio that is aligned with his or her individual plan. Portfolios will
include self-selected works that exemplify mastery of standards-based content knowledge and skills.
Quarterly report cards will be accompanied by teacher narratives addressing not only content knowledge
but also Understanding, Reasoning, Skills, Performance, and Dispositions (identified by Stiggins as
valuable achievement targets).

As is required by the California Department of Education, students will also participate in STAR
(Standardized Testing and Reporting, which includes the CAT6 and the California Standards Test), the
California English Language Development Test (CELDT), and all other mandated accountability
programs. We firmly believe that the academic program will fully prepare students for success in these
statewide assessment programs. Additional support structures (i.e., after-school tutoring, year-round
enrichment programs, mentoring programs, peer study groups, etc.) will be in place to ensure that
students surpass the performance of their peers in comparable school settings.

Staff will use all pieces of the assessment system in an ongoing effort to examine student performance
and revise instructional practices to address student needs. At no time will TPHS become complacent
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with the examination of assessment findings. Staff will continuously be challenged to rethink current
pedagogical practices to meet the changing needs of new and existing student populations.

TPHS will adopt and implement a ―Tuning Protocol‖ to be used as a vehicle for examining student
assessment results, and to examine lesson plans continually to determine efficacy in relation to student
outcomes. Below is a rationale for using the ―Tuning Protocol‖ and a description of the process.

To take part in the Tuning Protocol, educators bring samples of their students’ work on paper and,
whenever possible, on video, as well as any other relevant supplemental material such as assignment
descriptions and scoring rubrics. In a circle of about three to five colleagues, a facilitator guides the
group through the process and keeps time. The presenting educator, or team of educators, describes the
context for the student work (the task or project) – uninterrupted by questions or comments from
participants.

Often the presenter begins with a focusing question or area about which they would especially welcome
feedback. The question “Are you seeing evidence of persuasive writing in the students’ work?” is a good
example of such a question. Participants have time to examine the student work and ask clarifying
questions. With the presenter listening but silent, participants then offer warm and cool feedback – both
supportive and challenging. Presenters often frame their feedback as a question, for example, “How
might the project be different if students chose their research topics?”

After this feedback is offered, the presenter has the opportunity, again uninterrupted, to reflect on the
feedback and address any comments or questions they choose. Time is reserved for debriefing the
experience. Both presenting and participating educators have found the tuning experience to be a
powerful stimulus for encouraging reflection on their practice.

In addition to the regular meetings to analyze student work, TPHS will identify a data management
system for managing and analyzing school-wide student performance data (i.e., standardized test data,
teacher generated summative assessment, and curriculum embedded assessments).

Professional Development
In addition to the professional development opportunities described in the ―Staff Recruitment,
Development, and Assessment‖ appendix, teachers will attend AB 466 training to correspond with the
textbooks adopted by the school, and administrators will attend AB 75 training in order to support
effective implementation of the adopted materials.

All staff members will participate in an ongoing training component, beginning prior to the school’s
opening and continuing monthly after the school has opened. This sustained training will allow the
school staff to work collaboratively in an effort to implement and refine a comprehensive school model,
which will provide students with the most relevant and effective instruction. During the training sessions,
teachers will engage in professional development on Backward Design, Project Based Learning, and other
research-proven processes and instructional strategies. They will also have collaborative time to develop
high-quality lesson plans based on the principles of Backward Design. Specifically, the work to be
accomplished during this professional development time will revolve around the alignment of standards,
assessment and instruction as outlined in the three stages described above in the ―Curriculum and
Content‖ section.

Additionally, TPHS intends to apply for professional development incentive funding for school Local
Education Agencies (LEA) through AB 430 to provide State Board of Education approved training for
administrators.

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APPENDIX C – CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
Development and implementation of curriculum shall be a top priority of the Tassajara Preparatory High
School (―TPHS‖) Site Board and the TPHS Administration. The TPHS Site Board will make
recommendations to the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation Board (the Board), who has ultimate approval
authority. The Board shall provide a comprehensive instructional program to serve the educational needs
of the students. The Board accepts responsibility for establishing what students should learn; therefore the
Board shall adopt a curriculum that reflects the mission and vision of TPHS to the greatest extent
possible.

The Principal, or designee, shall have the general coordinating authority over the design and development
of the curriculum. The Principal, or designee, shall develop a process for curriculum review and
development, which will include the participation of teachers, administrators, students, parents/guardians,
and members of the community.

The Principal, or designee, shall keep the Board informed regarding current curriculum efforts and
student achievement. The Principal, or designee, shall provide all necessary assistance to the Board in
reviewing reports, information, and data on each curriculum area for presentation and adoption by the
Board. Prior to adoption of curriculum, the Board shall discuss its findings with the public at a regularly
scheduled Board meeting.

Curriculum development is to be based upon:

1. Research that is educationally sound;
2. State adopted instructional materials will guide the School in the initial selection of instructional
materials to meet our students’ and curricular needs; however, as a charter school, Education Code
does not require that we adopt curriculum from the state adopted instructional materials list. When
curricular material evaluation deems such an adoption necessary, the school will select an appropriate
adoption to meet student needs.
3. Change in legislation;
4. Needs of students, teachers, and parents.

The following are to be considered when making any changes in program or curriculum:

1. Costs within budget approved by the Board;
2. Available facilities, material, and personnel.

The Principal, or designee, shall have the responsibility for implementing an instructional program that is
articulated at all levels.

All curricula shall be adopted by the Board; elimination of curriculum must also be approved by the
Board.

Honors & Advanced Placement Courses
Honors courses shall be developed by the TPHS staff to meet the needs of talented students. An Honors
course parallels the curriculum offered in the corresponding regular class, but may cover additional
topics, or some topics in greater depth. Honors courses may be organized as separate classes, or as extra
projects or seminars supplementing a regular course.

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An Advanced Placement course is designed to prepare students to take the College Board-sponsored
Advanced Placement exam. These national curricula are developed by both high school and college
teachers under the auspices of the College Board.

Requirements for registering in these courses may include teacher recommendation, pre-requisite grades,
and test scores.

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APPENDIX D – DRAFT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
The following course descriptions are a sample of the courses that may be offered at Tassajara
Preparatory High School (“TPHS”). Course curricula in all subject areas are backward designed to
meet or exceed Common Core State Standards in all subject areas, and to pursue accreditation by the
Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). Advanced Placement courses will be available
based on prerequisite coursework and teacher recommendation. Students may qualify for Honors
courses based on teacher recommendation and the previous year‟s STAR results. Intervention courses
will be scheduled on an as needed basis. This is a draft course catalogue.

MATHEMATICS
Algebra I
Grade Level: 9-10
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra
Algebra I is for students who are familiar with such concepts as solving equations for x, the Cartesian
plane, absolute value, inequalities, percentages, and reading and interpreting graphs. The course will
study algebraic concepts including real numbers and polynomials, relations and functions, creation and
application of linear functions and relations, and an introduction to nonlinear functions. This course
assumes that students are quite familiar with working with fractions and decimals. Appropriate
technology, including the TI-83+ or TI-84+ graphing calculator, will be used regularly for instruction and
assessment. Daily preparation for the class is essential since topics are continually building upon each
other and connections between topics are continually examined. Students will take an End-of-Course
exam.

Geometry
Grade Level: 9-11
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Geometry teaches students who have had Algebra I how to think in a rigorous and logical manner.
Students need to be able to solve equations with two variables and to simplify algebraic expressions.
Geometry solidifies the knowledge of concepts already encountered and learned in a more deductive
approach. Two- and three-dimensional reasoning skills are emphasized, and students will broaden their
use of the coordinate plane to include isometric transformations such as rotations, reflections, translations,
and the non-isometric dilation transformation. Trigonometric relationships such as the sine, cosine, and
tangent are introduced. Daily preparation for class is essential since topics continually build upon each
other and connections between topics are continually examined. Students will take an End-of-Course
exam.

Honors Geometry
Grade Level: 9-11
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I and/or teacher recommendation
Honors Geometry supplements students’ inductive understanding of geometric principles learned in
middle school with a more rigorous deductive approach. The proof is the keystone of this deductive
approach to learning geometric concepts. Several techniques of proving geometric theorems are
introduced such as the construction, coordinate, and contradiction proof methods. Two- and three-
dimensional reasoning skills will be emphasized and students will broaden their use of the coordinate

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plane to include isometric transformations such as rotations, reflections, translations, and the non-
isometric dilation transformation. Trigonometric relationships such as the sine, cosine, and tangent are
introduced. Properties of circles and polygons are further examined in the context of real world activities
such as surveying, carpentry, architecture, and construction. The prerequisite expectation is that students
understand graphing coordinates in the coordinate plane, the components of the slope-intercept form of a
linear equation including how to derive the equation of a line connecting two points, and solving for an
unknown variable in both linear and non-linear equations. Daily preparation for the class is essential
since topics are continually building upon each other and connections between topics are continually
examined. Students will take an End-of-Course exam.

Algebra II
Grade Level: 9-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Algebra II continues students’ study of basic algebraic concepts including functions, exponents,
polynomials, graphing, rational expressions, and systems of equations. New concepts introduced include
logarithms, probability and discrete analysis, matrices, and complex numbers. Much time is spent on
quadratics, including multiple methods of solving quadratic equations and inequalities, and graphing
conic sections. Practical applications are emphasized for all skills. Students are consistently taught how
to solve problems without the aid of a calculator, but are also trained in the use of a graphing calculator.
Students will take an End-of-Course exam.

Honors Algebra II
Grade Level: 9-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Honors Algebra II continues students’ study of basic algebraic concepts including functions, exponents,
polynomials, graphing, rational expressions, and systems of equations. New concepts introduced include
logarithms, matrices, and complex numbers. Much time is spent on quadratics, including multiple
methods of solving quadratic equations and inequalities, and graphing conic sections. Practical
applications are emphasized for all skills. Students are consistently taught how to solve problems without
the aid of a calculator, but are also trained in the use of a graphing calculator. This advanced course goes
deeper and requires more of the students than the standard course. Students are expected to bring
different skills together for advanced problem solving, to derive for themselves many of the formulas they
use, and to generalize from specific formulas to broader applications. Students will take an End-of-
Course exam.

Honors Functions and Modeling
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II
Honors Functions and Modeling provides students an in-depth study of modeling and applying functions
in areas from consumer issues to public policy to scientific investigations. A variety of mathematical
relationships including trigonometric functions are introduced and explored with an emphasis on
applications to real-life problems. The main goal of the course, however, is to enable the students to
understand trigonometry and functions in order to advance in further studies. The prerequisite
expectation is that students will have a grasp of the topics learned in Geometry and Algebra II, especially
linear functions and other functional concepts such as domain and range. The in-class expectation will be
that students actively participate in the class discussions and have a desire to supplement their
understanding of mathematics. Advanced Functions and Modeling replaces Algebra III/Trigonometry.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
Pre Calculus
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II
Pre Calculus supplements a thorough exploration of topics discussed in Algebra II and Geometry with an
introduction to sequences, series, data analysis, and calculus. The trigonometric relationships among sine,
cosine, tangent, and the unit circle will also be introduced. The Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines are
discussed within the contextual framework of real-life applications. The crux of the course is in the study
of functions. Students will learn the application of functions to model behavior in addition to exploring
the concepts of functional limits and derivatives, which are essential to calculus. The prerequisite
expectation is that students have a strong grasp of the topics discussed in Geometry and Algebra II.
Furthermore, students should have a desire to be exposed to advanced mathematical concepts and their
applications to a variety of disciplines such as science or engineering. Students participate in the class
discussions and can help provide direction to solving complex problems.

Advanced Placement Statistics (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite for Seniors: Pre Calculus
Co-requisite for Sophomores and Juniors: Calculus
AP Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing
conclusions from data. Students are exposed to the four major themes of exploring data, sampling and
experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students should be prepared to actively
participate and work consistently on a daily basis both in class and on homework. The course will
prepare students to take the AP Statistics exam.

Calculus
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Pre Calculus
Calculus includes an extensive review of functions including domains, ranges, roots, intercepts and
asymptotes. Given a verbal scenario, students will be able to identify the dependent variable, the
independent variable and the function that relates them, and they will be able to graph the function. The
concepts of limits and continuity will be studied in depth. The study of limits will be expanded to
introduce the derivative. Students will understand that the derivative is the rate of change of a function
and will be able to relate that to verbal scenarios, graphs and algebraic functions. Students will learn to
take derivatives by using the definition of the derivative and by using the standard rules for taking
derivatives. The concepts of maximum and minimum values of a function will be explored and students
will understand how to find those values using the first derivative. The second derivative will be
introduced and students will learn how to use the second derivative to determine the concavity of a
function. The relationship of the first and second derivative to velocity and acceleration will be examined
in depth. There will be a strong emphasis on a conceptual understanding of the derivative and what
information it provides about the function. Integrals will be introduced and there will be an emphasis on
what an integral means and when it is used.

Advanced Placement Calculus AB (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Pre Calculus or permission of the instructor

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AP Calculus AB is an intensive review of functions including domains, ranges, and functional limits that
will be expanded upon to introduce the concepts of a derivative and integral. The first derivative is
related to measures of change such as the slope of linear equations and to functional maxima and minima.
The relationship between functions describing movement and the first and second derivative are
examined. The concept of an integral is then introduced, and applications to Phase I clinical research are
presented. This course is designed to provide a classical study of Calculus that will enable further study
of multivariate Calculus or differential equations. The prerequisite expectations will be a thorough
understanding of functions and limits and a desire to take the AP Calculus AB exam. Students should be
prepared to actively participate and work consistently on a daily basis since much of the material is
theoretical.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC is a continuation of the AP Calculus sequence. The course will consist of more technical
explorations of Calculus AB topics such as integration and differential equations. Techniques such as ―u
substitution‖ and ―integration by parts‖ will be explored along with slope field and other techniques.
Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions and complete daily homework
assignments. The course will prepare students to take the AP Calculus BC exam.

SCIENCE

The science curriculum at TPHS prepares students for AP courses and is integrated with the prerequisite
mathematics. Students aspiring to AP Science courses are encouraged to pass Elementary Algebra by 8th
grade. Because students progress through mathematics at different rates, the relationship to grade level is
somewhat variable.

Prior to graduation, students are required to complete 3 high school laboratory-based science classes* The
required classes follow the University of California and California State University recommendations for
academic preparation in the natural sciences of entering students, satisfy the most current California State
Standards, and the AP requirements (if applicable). At TPHS the required laboratory-based classes are
Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, and Biology/AP Biology. Information about the California Science
standards and the Advanced Placement Requirements can be found at the websites below.

California State Science Standards
http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/sciencestnd.pdf

The

College Board description of Advanced Placement Classes
http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/subjects.html

*Students

may take more than one science class simultaneously (beginning in Grade 11) with the
approval of teachers and parents.

Conceptual Physics (Honors Option Available)
Grade Level: 9-10
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I
(Note: If a student currently in Algebra I decides to take this class they must expect extra effort/tutoring
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and this may become mandatory depending on progress.)

Conceptual Physics is the first high school laboratory science course, and is required of all students for
graduation. This course will aim primarily at preparing students for future careers in this 21st century. It
is a required prerequisite for AP Physics. Some simple geometry and trigonometry will be taught when
needed. Students will need good study skills and an interest in learning more about the physical universe.
This course will provide partial preparation for the SAT Physics Subject Test. Additional study would be
required. The teacher has study guides and a more advanced text to help with this if requested. Students
will take an End-of-Course exam.

Course Objectives:
 To teach students the concepts of Introductory Newtonian Mechanics, Heat and
Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism, Waves and Sound, Light and Optics
 To acquaint students with different lab methodologies through frequent hands-on student
experiences
 To teach students the importance of units and careful data collection
 To prepare students for the state subject test and provide partial preparation for the SAT Physics
Subject Test

Chemistry (Honors Option Available)
Grade Level: 10-11
Length: 1 year
Prerequisites: Conceptual Physics and Geometry

Chemistry is the second in our laboratory science curriculum. The course emphasizes laboratory and
analytical skills in addition to problem solving and abstract thought. The course also aims to connect
course material to modern issues and current events, focusing mainly on environmental and biochemical
issues. The class is built around the following major topics: atomic and molecular structure, chemical
bonds, conservation of matter and stoichiometry, gasses and their properties, acids and bases, solutions,
chemical thermodynamics, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, and nuclear processes. Students will take
an End-of-Course exam.

Course Objectives:
 Application of algebra to problem solving in science, including but not limited to unit
conversions, measurements, dimensional analysis and the use of significant figures
 Development of critical thinking, measurements and observational skills
 Create understanding of a wide array of introductory inorganic chemistry topics and the
associated introductory laboratory skills
 Advance proper laboratory notebook and record keeping skills in preparation for and modeled
after college/university laboratory courses

Biology (Honors Option Available)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Chemistry, Geometry

Themes covered include chemical basis of life, metabolism of cells, genetic continuity, homeostasis in
plants and animals, and the evolution and ecology of populations. This class will emphasize ―hands-on‖
learning and is suited for students who perform best with opportunities for drill and practice. Laboratory

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skills, including lab reports, are emphasized as a major portion of the class. Students will take an End-of-
Course exam.

Advanced Placement Biology (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, Algebra 1 & 2 and Geometry, Permission of the Instructor

AP Biology is a college-level course designed to challenge students to extend their knowledge of
biological theories and processes beyond the level of an introductory science course. Students explore
various themes through an in-depth analysis of the following biological topics: science as a process,
evolution, energy-transfer, continuity and change, relationship of form to function, regulation, the
interdependence of nature and the relationship between science, technology, and society. The class
involves lectures, lab experiments, student-led discussions, quizzes, and tests. Students are expected to
complete about one hour of homework per night, including intensive reading assignments. The course
will prepare students to take the AP Biology exam.

Course Objectives: (Many of these topics, especially the topic of evolution, are interwoven throughout
the curriculum.)
 Science as a Process—Science is a way of knowing. It can involve a discovery process using
inductive reasoning, or it can be a process of hypothesis testing.
 Evolution—Biological change of organisms that occurs over time, which is driven by the process
of natural selection. Evolution accounts for the diversity of life on earth.
 Energy Transfer—Energy is the capacity to do work. All living organisms are active (living)
because of their abilities to link energy reactions to the biochemical reactions that take place
within their cells.
 Continuity and Change—All species tend to maintain themselves from generation to generation
using the same genetic code. However, there are genetic mechanisms that lead to change over
time, or evolution.
 Relationship of Structure to Function—The structural levels from molecules to organisms ensure
successful functioning in all living organisms and living systems.
 Interdependence in Nature—Living organisms rarely exist alone in nature
 Science, Technology, and Society—Scientific research often leads to technological advances that
can have positive and/or negative impacts upon society as a whole.

This course covers the following areas of biology: (Several biological themes will be intertwined in the
material throughout the year.)
 Molecules and Cells (25%) — Chemistry, Cells, and Cellular Energy
 Heredity and Evolution (25%) — Heredity, Molecular Genetics, and Evolution
 Organisms and Populations (50%) — Diversity, Plants, Animals, and Ecology

Advanced Placement Chemistry (AP)
Grade level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Permission of instructor

This course is intended to meet the objectives of the Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry curriculum
designed by The College Board. The course covers advanced topics in chemistry including kinetics,
oxidation-reduction, equilibrium, thermo-chemistry, quantitative and qualitative analysis, and
introductory organic chemistry. Students will continue to develop chemistry laboratory skills and learn to
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predict results of reactions and properties of reaction products. Students will complete an intensive
schedule of advanced lab exercises and perform independent research projects. The course culminates in
the Advanced Placement exam. This class is designed for highly motivated students with good reading
comprehension and study skills. Students are expected to complete about one hour of homework per
night, including intensive reading assignments. This course is reading- and writing-intensive. The course
will prepare students to take the AP Chemistry exam.

Advanced Placement Physics C (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Permission of instructor
This curriculum covers linear and rotational mechanics and dynamics, gravitation, thermal physics, fluid
dynamics, wave theory, electromagnetism, geometric optics, atomic theory, and an introduction to
relativity and modern physics. All topics are taught with a mix of theoretical work and practical
laboratory work, in which the students demonstrate results for themselves. Some math will be taught
(particularly vectors), but the emphasis is on developing physical intuition, and on using the math that
students already know to solve physical problems. The course will prepare students to take the AP
Physics exam.

Environmental Science
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, Biology
This course is designed to introduce students to basic topics in environmental science. Students will use
their knowledge of biology, chemistry, and geology to understand environmental processes. It is a
science course, but it draws from many other disciplines, including economics, geography, and politics, to
encourage a total understanding of how the natural processes interact with human actions. The class
provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the
interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and
human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative
solutions for resolving or preventing them. A combination of labs, discussion, projects and analysis is
critical in understanding the topics at this level.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Recommendation by science teacher
The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory
college course in environmental science. This rigorous science course emphasizes a strong understanding
of biological, chemical, and geological processes; however, the course draws from many other
disciplines, including economics, geography, and politics, to encourage a total understanding of how the
natural processes interact with human actions. The class provides students with the scientific principles,
concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify
and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks
associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. A
combination of intensive reading assignments, labs, classroom discussion, projects and analysis is critical
in understanding the topics at this level. The course will prepare students to take the AP Environmental
Science exam.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                            August 1, 2011
HISTORY
World History
Grade Level: 9-10
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: None
This course is an advanced survey of world history from early civilizations to the present. The course
focuses on comparative history across time and across the world. Students learn both the history of world
cultures and civilizations and the skills necessary to be a successful history student throughout high
school and college. There is an emphasis on using primary source material. Students learn to read the
same sources professional historians read and learn to analyze material based on audience, context, and
message. Students practice research skills such as note taking, outlining, and footnoting and participate in
a museum project. This class is suited for highly motivated students with good reading comprehension
skills and good writing skills. Students are asked to read and interpret material independently to prepare
for class discussion. Students should feel comfortable summarizing main ideas and expressing opinions in
writing. This course is reading- and writing-intensive.

Civics and Economics
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: World History
This course is a study of the economic, legal, and political systems of the United States. More
specifically, students learn about the roots of the American democratic system, the founding documents,
the structure of local, state, and national government and economics. There is an emphasis placed on
connecting the curriculum to current events and interactions with state and local governmental leaders.
Students develop strong reading and writing skills and work regularly with primary-source materials like
Supreme Court cases. Students also participate in a school-wide simulated congressional hearing as a
culmination of their study of the federal government. Students will take an End-of-Course exam.

U.S. History
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Civics and Economics
This course surveys United States history from pre-colonial times to the present. Students study the
political, economic, and social history of the United States. There is a strong focus on reading and
interpreting primary source material as well as evaluating and discussing historical debates. Students are
expected to prepare for class discussion each day. In addition, students will be asked to engage in
independent research. Students will take an End-of-Course exam.

Advanced Placement U.S. History (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Civics and Economics
This course is an in-depth survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States from
pre-colonial times to the present. There is a strong focus on reading and interpreting primary source
material as well as evaluating and discussing historical debates and completing independent research.
Students will be expected to do summer reading and work over the breaks. Students will read 10-15
pages of challenging material each night. They will also complete periodic writing assignments in
addition to a major (10-page) research project. In addition, students will be expected to learn and retain a
large amount of factual information. Students should have a strong interest in history and be prepared to
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devote considerable time and energy to this class. This course will prepare students to take the AP exam
in U.S. History in May. Students will take an End-of-Course exam.

Advanced Placement U.S. Government (AP)
Grade Level: 12
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Civics and Economics
Prerequisite or co-requisite: U.S. History.
This course will give students perspective on the theory of how the government and politics work in the
United States and how they work in reality. Students will use current news to see examples of how and
why our political system works as it does. In election years, students will follow the hoopla and
excitement of the campaign. Some of the questions we will discuss include: Why the Founders
established the type of government they did? What does it mean to be a liberal or conservative? Why do
people vote the way they do? Is there bias in the media? What are successful and unsuccessful campaign
strategies that candidates have used? How do political parties, interest groups, and the media influence
our politics? What powers do our national institutions such as Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy,
and federal courts have and why do they function the way they do? We will discuss influential Supreme
Court decisions to understand the evolution of our civil rights and liberties. The class will involve
extensive discussion, debates, congressional simulations, and analysis of campaign ads. This course will
prepare students to take the AP exam in U.S. Government & Politics in May.

Advanced Placement European History (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Civics and Economics
Prerequisite or co-requisite: U.S. History
This course is an advanced survey of European history from the High Renaissance (1450) to the present.
The course is a mixture of intellectual, cultural, diplomatic, economic, and social history. There is a
strong focus on reading and interpreting primary source material as well as evaluating and discussing
historical debates and completing independent research. Students will be expected to do summer reading
and work over the breaks. In addition, students will be expected to learn and retain a large amount of
factual information. Students should have a strong interest in history and be prepared to devote
considerable time and energy to this class. This course will prepare students to take the AP exam in
European History.

America at War: Revolution and Civil War
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Civics and Economics
This class will spend the first semester looking at the American Revolution and the second semester will
be devoted to the American Civil War. For both wars, we will be examining the social, political, military,
and economic aspects of the wars. Students will study these wars through primary documents, secondary
sources, debates, trial reenactments, critiques of movies, and class presentations.

Constitutional Issues
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Civics and Economics
Prerequisite or co-requisite: U.S. History

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In this course, students will study the history and principles of the United States Constitution. Students
will examine the way the Constitution has been interpreted over time using Supreme Court cases and
other primary documents. Students will also apply what they learn to modern constitutional issues like
affirmative action, privacy issues, church and state issues, homeland security, and other controversial
issues. Students will engage in independent research projects.

ENGLISH
English I
Grade Level: 9
Length: 1 year
This course is designed to challenge academically advanced, highly motivated students who are capable
of comprehending and analyzing literary texts. Students will read 8-10 major works of world literature as
well as poetry and shorter works of fiction and nonfiction. Frequent writing assignments will develop
students’ critical thinking skills and creative expression. The course will provide a study of grammar,
mechanics, usage, and vocabulary.

Honors English I
Grade Level: 9
Length: 1 year
This course is designed for highly academically advanced, highly motivated students who are capable of
reading complex literature independently and analyzing it in terms of themes, character motivation, and
cultural and philosophical contexts. Students will read 10-12 major works of world literature as well as
poetry and shorter works of fiction and nonfiction. Frequent writing assignments will promote close
textual analysis, as well as developing students’ critical thinking skills and creative expression. The
course will provide a study of grammar, mechanics, usage, and vocabulary. This course is reading-
intensive and writing-intensive.

English II
Grade Level: 10
Length: 1 year
This college-preparatory course focuses on the development of complex thought processes, independence
in learning, and creative expression through discussion and frequent writing assignments. This course is
designed to challenge academically advanced, highly motivated students who are capable of
comprehending and analyzing literary texts. Students will read 10-11 major works of world literature as
well as poetry and shorter works of fiction and nonfiction. Frequent writing assignments will develop
students’ critical thinking skills and creative expression. The course will provide a study of grammar,
mechanics, usage, and vocabulary. Sophomores take the Tenth-Grade Writing Test.

Honors English II
Grade Level: 10
Length: 1 year
This course is designed for highly academically advanced, highly motivated students who are capable of
reading complex literature independently and analyzing it in terms of themes, character motivation, and
cultural and philosophical contexts. Students will read 12-14 major works of world literature. Frequent
writing assignments will promote close textual analysis, as well as developing students’ critical thinking
skills and creative expression. The course will provide a study of grammar, mechanics, usage, and
vocabulary. This course is reading-intensive and writing-intensive. Sophomores take the Tenth-Grade
Writing Test.
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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
English III
Grade Level: 11
Length: 1 year
This course is designed to challenge academically advanced, highly motivated students who are capable
of comprehending and analyzing literary texts. Students will read 11-12 major works of American
literature as well as poetry and shorter works of fiction and nonfiction. Frequent writing assignments will
develop students’ critical thinking skills and creative expression. The course will provide a study of
grammar, mechanics, usage, and vocabulary.

Advanced Placement English III (AP)
Grade Level: 11
Length: 1 year
AP English Language and Composition is designed for highly academically advanced, highly motivated
students who are capable of reading complex literary selections independently and analyzing them in
terms of themes, character motivation, and cultural and philosophical contexts. Students will read 13-15
major works of American and British literature as well as poetry and short works. In addition to the
rigorous reading load in fiction, drama, and poetry, students will read approximately 20 nonfiction essays
from a rhetorical reader. Writing assignments will include close textual analysis of fiction and drama and
timed writings that analyze persuasive writing and create rhetorically sound arguments. Students will
study advanced composition skills, including lessons in grammar, mechanics, usage, and vocabulary.
This course is extremely reading-intensive and writing-intensive and will demand approximately an hour
of homework per night. Students who take this course are expected to take the AP exam in English
Language and Composition.

English IV
Grade Level: 12
Length: 1 year
This course is designed to challenge academically advanced, highly motivated students who are capable
of comprehending and analyzing literary texts. Students will read 11-12 major works of British literature
as well as poetry and shorter works of fiction and nonfiction. Frequent writing assignments will develop
students’ critical thinking skills and creative expression. The course will provide a study of grammar,
mechanics, usage, and vocabulary.

Advanced Placement English IV (AP)
Grade Level: 12
Length: 1 year
AP English Literature and Composition is designed for highly academically advanced, highly motivated
students who are capable of reading complex literary selections independently and analyzing them in
terms of themes, character motivation, and cultural and philosophical contexts. Students will read 13-15
major works of British literature as well as poetry and short works. There is a rigorous reading load in
fiction, drama, and poetry. Writing assignments will include close textual analyses of fiction, poetry, and
drama. Timed writings analyze prose and poetic passages and treat literary concepts from the student’s
repertoire. Students will study advanced composition skills, including lessons in grammar, mechanics,
usage, and vocabulary. This course is extremely reading-intensive and writing-intensive and will demand
approximately an hour of homework per night. Students who take this course are expected to take the AP
Examination in English Literature and Composition.

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FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Level I & II
Grade Level: 9-11
Length: 2 years
These courses are designed for the student who wishes to take a language for the first time, as well as one
who has explored the language in middle school. All four of the basic skills—listening, speaking,
reading, and writing—will be emphasized. The curriculum is enhanced through the use of multimedia
educational materials, and study of the culture of the people.

Level III & IV
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: 2 years
Levels III and IV are for students who have successfully completed Levels II or III. Students are
combined in one class that has a two-year curriculum. Emphasis is on increasing oral/aural skills through
reading, writing, and conversation. The basic principles of grammar are reviewed over the two-year
period. The student’s knowledge of the history and culture of the lands where that language is spoken is
broadened through readings and audiovisual materials.

Advanced Placement Foreign Language and Composition (AP)
Grade Level: 12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Recommendation of instructor
These courses will cover all areas of communication in an intensive and extensive study of advanced
grammar and will demand increased oral, aural, and written proficiency as the student prepares for the AP
exam for the selected foreign language. Authentic literary texts are included in the curriculum. These
courses may be recommended after Level IV, or in certain cases, after Level III. AP Spanish, AP French
and AP Chinese are planned to be offered.

The following Foreign Language courses are being considered: Spanish, French, German, Chinese,
Japanese, Korean, Latin, Arabic and American Sign Language.

FINE ARTS
Visual Arts I
Grade Level: 9-12
Length: 1 year
In this introductory course for the high school art program students explore a wide variety of art media
including drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, and mixed media. Students examine art and
aesthetics from a multicultural perspective and learn how to critique their own art. Students will learn
about artists and their influences on each other and on the culture.

Visual Arts II
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Visual Arts I
In this course students extend their visual literacy, engage in communications through art and refine their
art skills. Students explore more advanced techniques and begin to investigate historical artistic
movements. Students without the necessary prerequisite may enroll with the instructor’s permission.
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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
Visual Arts III
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Visual Arts II
Students will engage in advanced study of art processes, aesthetic issues, and art criticism. They will
express concepts and communicate ideas using advanced approaches in various media. Each student will
work to develop an individual style and become familiar with art schools and art careers. Students will
read and discuss a wide variety of current art topics.

Visual Arts IV
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Visual Arts III
Students will engage in advanced study of art processes, aesthetic issues, art criticism, and art history
while maintaining the attitude and self-discipline of a working artist. Students will exhibit technical
proficiency and personal style while working in art media. They will learn how to exhibit their own art,
as well as the works of others. A culminating portfolio showing evidence of quality, concentration, and
breadth of work produced throughout their high school program will be required.

Advanced Placement Studio Art (AP)
Grade Level: 11-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Visual Arts IV or teacher recommendation
AP Studio Art is designed for students who have demonstrated outstanding capabilities in expressing
themselves with art media, have a high degree of commitment to communicating through art, and
maintain the attitudes and self-discipline of working artists. Students can choose between submitting a
portfolio of drawing media, two dimensional media, or three-dimensional media. Each student will
submit a portfolio in the spring. College credit and/or placement may be awarded if a qualifying AP
score is achieved for the student’s Studio Art portfolio.

Theatre Arts I: Introductory Acting
Grade Level: 9-12
Length: 1 year
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the art and craft of theatre. It
introduces elementary concepts, methods, theatrical terminology, and discipline, and explores the creative
process. Students will develop and refine basic skills in all areas of theatre. A primary goal of this course
is to connect this information and these skills with the student’s own experiences, interests, values and
career objectives.

Theatre Arts II
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I
This course continues the study of the art and craft of theatre at an advanced level. Students will
participate in an in-depth exploration of theatre history and related styles of acting and design with an
emphasis on analysis, research and technical skills. Students will demonstrate knowledge, sensitivity,
flexibility, and intuition in functioning as a member of an ensemble.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                              August 1, 2011
Band I
Grade Level: 9-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course is designed for students interested in strengthening their skills in instrumental music and their
knowledge of music theory, history, practicing methods, performance in small ensembles and enhancing
technique (scales, arpeggios and sight reading). The course is designed to work in conjunction with the
student’s private lessons. Students would be able to audition for Intermediate Band from this course.

Intermediate Band
Grade Level: 10-12
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Previous band experience
In this course, band literature and instrumental music skills are studied in both classical and contemporary
fields. The method of study is of a more global nature, integrating instrumental literature with music
theory, music history and appreciation, and the development of listening skills. Students must have
acquired a proficiency in fingering and technical knowledge of their instrument. Students will be required
to perform outside the regular class period.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Physical Education

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to have physical activity, learn some
lifetime sports skills, and to develop individual fitness. A variety of activities such as volleyball,
lightening ball, tennis, badminton, basketball, football and soccer may be offered depending on
availability of facilities.

All students in grade nine, whether or not they are enrolled in a physical education class or participate in a
block schedule, will take The State Board of Education (SBE) designated FITNESSGRAM® as the
Physical Fitness Test (PFT) for students in California public schools. TPSH shall administer the PFT
annually during the months of February through May.
•   The school will provide the physical fitness test results to the California Department of Education
(CDE).
•   TPHS will provide students with their individual results after completing the PFT either orally or in
writing.
•   TPHS will report the summary results of the PFT in their annual School Accountability Report Card
(SARC).

Health
Grade Level: 10-11
Length: 1 semester
The California State Frameworks for Health Education state specific focal points for high school. High
School Health Frameworks focus on the acceptance of personal responsibility for lifelong health.
Prevention is a mainstay of the curriculum. Topics covered include, but are not limited to: Nutrition,
disease prevention, the human body, potentially dangerous situations and strategies, and alcohol, tobacco,
and drug education.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                              August 1, 2011
APPENDIX E – UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA COURSE APPROVAL
TIMELINE
The following timeline and process matrix has been
designed to assist your course development and submission
process. This timeline/process is recommended, not
required. It often takes up to a year to develop a new course
fully and to receive UC approval.

School / District Activity                       Timeline         UC Activity         Timeline
Research course materials, topics, & resources                  June – July

Write course description for new course                          August

Feedback from school staff & district personnel                 September

If desired, submit draft description to Cadre of Experts        September
member for informal feedback (http://www.ucop.edu/a
gGuide/ag/support.php)

Revise course description based on feedback from school,        November
district, and Cadre member(s)

Finalize course description for local school board approval     November

Submit course to school board for approval & apply for          December
WASC accreditation

Receive l school board approval                                  January

Ensure new course will be included in school/district            January
“Course Catalog” for student scheduling

Revise course description for UC submission                      January

Investigate proper procedure for new course submissions          January
(to UC) from your school/district

Submit UC course list updates, along with new course            February
descriptions, to UC

Receive updated list with UC approvals/denials                     May        Post updated course       May
list on doorways, web
site & send
communication to
school
If new course not approved, revise based on UC feedback         June – July

Re-submit revised course description to UC for approval          August

Reply to school         September

New course offered to students                                  September

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                                  August 1, 2011
APPENDIX F – COMMUNITY OUTREACH PLAN
Intended Outreach Plan 2011 – 2012
Condition of Approval: Section B Admissions

“The means by which a school will achieve a racial and ethnic balance among its pupils that is reflective
of the general population residing within territorial jurisdiction of the school district to which the charter
petition is submitted.”
– California Education Code Section 47605(b) (5)(G)

I.   Good faith outreach efforts to socio-economically disadvantages students:

Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) will implement a strategy that includes, but is not
necessarily limited to, the following elements or strategies which focus on achieving and maintaining a
racial and ethnic balance among students that is reflective of the general population residing in the
territorial jurisdiction of Dublin Unified School District (―DUSD‖).

    An enrollment process that is scheduled to include a timeline that allows for a broad-based
application process.
    The development and distribution of promotional and informational material that reaches out to the
various racial and ethnic groups represented in the territorial jurisdiction of DUSD.
    Create a Minority Outreach Committee that will evaluate, advise, and assist in the recruitment of an
ethnically diverse student population.
    Outreach activities include, but are not limited to:
 Press releases and other communications with local print and news media;
 Posting of all notices and banners in libraries and other public buildings and spaces, as well as
local businesses and religious institutions.

As part of outreach:

    Multi-lingual flyers regarding upcoming TPHS meetings;
    General information sheets and other key documents, including school mission and vision in many
languages;
    Translators at all general charter school meetings;
    Hotline voicemail number printed on all flyers/posters with extended language options.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                              August 1, 2011
Enrollment Goal: In year one (1) of operation, TPHS expects to attract a student enrollment equivalent
of 50% of DUSD’s percentage of Free and Reduced lunch students. TPHS intends to meet and exceed
the District’s ethnic diversity and low socio-economic enrollment by the third year of operation.

District                County    TPHS Goal to
Percent Percent
of      of
Enrollment Total   Total   Meet & Exceed
American
34           0.60%      0.40%     0.60%
Indian
1,388        24.20%     20.70%    24.20%
Asian
Pacific
48           0.80%      1.50%     0.80%
Islander
406          7.10%      5.20%     7.10%
Filipino
815          14.20%     28.60%    14.20%
Hispanic

African
431          7.50%      15.20%    7.50%
American
2,508        43.70%     23.50%    n/a
White

Multiple/No
109          1.90%      4.80%     n/a
Response
519          9.00%      22.20%    9%
EL
Free &
Reduced
587          10.20%     38.80%    10.20%
Lunch
n/a
Total              5,739        100%       100%

Source: http://www.ed-data.k12.ca.us

II. Face to Face outreach efforts and Promotional Materials that encourage enrollment by socio-
economically disadvantaged students.

One on One Contact:
The following informational/enrollment opportunities are anticipated to further reach the socio-
economically disadvantaged families:

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                           August 1, 2011
Informational / Enrollment Tables

   Public Libraries
   Shopping Centers

Meetings
All town hall meetings will have translators.

Phone Call Contact
Native speaking volunteers will call all newly interested parents whose information was collected during
informational tables and meetings. A language hotline voice mailbox will be set up to answer any
questions as well as note concerns.

School Contact
With permission from DUSD, a general outreach program for the open application period will include
visiting district schools and passing out informational and meeting flyers.

Word of Mouth Distribution
Flyers will be distributed through friends and co-workers within the minority sector.

Business Contact
TPHS will meet with business owners with the goal of educating them about our school. We will request
permission to leave informational flyers and posters, as well as keep business owners and customers
updated throughout the open enrollment period.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                          August 1, 2011
APPENDIX G – ENRICHMENT PLAN
Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) intends to offer a wide variety of enrichment and extra-
curricular activity options.

Our students will have ample opportunities to expand their learning beyond the classroom and into the
community. On campus they will be involved in planning and organizing events as club members in our
student government. Off campus they will be involved in service learning projects in the community. As a
graduation requirement, students will log hours and provide tangible evidence of service in projects that
improve the Tri-Valley community throughout their years at TPHS.

We will also offer Model United Nations, Drama, Sports Teams, Leadership, the Student Ambassador
Program, and other programs where a sufficient number of students express an interest. These programs
will be funded through the School’s Educational Foundation and the TPHS Parent-Student-Teacher
Group as has been the successful model at Livermore Valley Charter Preparatory HS.

The offerings will include, but not be limited to:

Sports
We intend to compete in the North Coast Section (http://cifncs.org/) in the following sports: soccer,
lacrosse, basketball, cross country, track & field, badminton, tennis, golf, volleyball, softball, baseball,
swimming, and diving.

Associated Student Body
Student government will be a vital component of life at TPHS. The Associated Student Body (ASB)
will elect eight officers each spring to represent the student body.

The Executive Council is one branch of the student government, which includes each class and ASB
president, vice-president, and secretary/treasurer. It also includes the public relations commissioners, the
spirit commissioners and the senate leader. Together, the council is responsible for all ASB events, and
for enforcing all legislation governing the executive council. The Moderators will be made up of
Administrators, Teachers, and/or Counselors.

TPHS will also have a Student Senate. The Senate consists of the senate leader, the senate
secretary/treasurer, and three senators from each of the three classes. The senators assist their respective
classes and are responsible for planning and implementing all senate-sponsored events. Elections for
class officer and senate positions are conducted in the spring, shortly after the ASB elections.

Club and Academic Competitions
We also intend to offer a wide selection of extra-curricular opportunities including student clubs and
academic competitions.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                                August 1, 2011
APPENDIX H – DRAFT HEALTH & SAFETY POLICIES
This appendix contains a set of health and safety policies of the Tri Valley Learning Corporation
(―TVLC‖) Board. The policies attached are as follows:

Policy 1:        Criminal Background Checks

Policy 2:        Reporting Suspected Child Abuse / Neglect

Policy 3:        No Smoking

Policy 4:        Tuberculosis (TB) Testing

Policy 5:        Safe Facilities

Policy 6:        Emergency Plans

Policy 7:        Communicable Disease Control

Policy 8:        Medical Emergencies

Policy 9:        Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan

Policy 10:       Visitors on Campus

Policy 11:       Medication Administration

Policy 12:       Student Health Examinations and Immunizations

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                           August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                   DRAFT                                 Board Policy #1

CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECKS
A commitment to the safety and well-being of our children is a core value of Tri-Valley Learning
Corporation (―TVLC‖). No condition or activity will be permitted that might compromise that safety, and
the well-being of students takes precedence over all other considerations. While we place great value on
the contributions of staff, educators, and volunteers, there are conditions that are incompatible with
unescorted access to children. Conditions deemed by the Board to preclude working at TVLC include
conviction on charges of serious or violent misdemeanors or felonies, particularly those committed
against minors or involving abuse or molestation. TVLC has therefore adopted a strict policy of
prohibiting any individual with such a history from contact with TVLC students on school grounds or
during field trips or other sanctioned school activities. The Board will adopt a specific list of offenses and
offense categories deemed incompatible with work for or at school. To ensure the safety of the students,
all individuals working or volunteering at TVLC will be required to submit to a background criminal
investigation as follows:

I.   Employees

All employees of TVLC are required to, (1) disclose any arrest and/or conviction, and (2) undergo
fingerprint criminal background checks through the California Department of Justice (DOJ) and Federal
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) before employment to ensure that they have no arrest or conviction for any
serious or violent misdemeanor or felony. Employment is contingent upon clearance by the school
principal. All employees will be subject to DOJ subsequent arrest notification during the term of their
employment with TVLC. If TVLC receives subsequent notification of an arrest for any serious or violent
misdemeanor or felony, the school principal will have discretion as to whether or not to suspend
employment until the arrest is adjudicated. All records will be maintained in a strictly confidential
manner in compliance with DOJ reporting requirements.

II. Volunteers

All volunteers of TVLC who will be working with or supervising students in any capacity are first
required to (1) disclose any arrest and/or conviction, and (2) undergo fingerprint criminal background
checks through the California Department of Justice (DOJ) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
before volunteering to ensure that they have no arrest or conviction for any serious or violent
misdemeanor or felony. Volunteer work is contingent upon a successful background check and receiving
clearance from a review team designated by the school principal. Volunteer work at TVLC may not
begin until the individual has obtained clearance from the review team. Persons receiving clearance from
the review team will be termed ―Registered Volunteers.‖ Registered Volunteers will be subject to DOJ
subsequent arrest notification during the term of their volunteerism with TVLC. If TVLC receives
subsequent notification of a Registered Volunteer’s arrest for any serious or violent misdemeanor or
felony, the school principal will have discretion as to whether or not to suspend volunteerism until the
arrest is adjudicated. All records will be maintained in a strictly confidential manner in compliance with
DOJ reporting requirements.

Volunteers who will have no contact with students and will be performing their volunteer work off
campus are not required to undergo fingerprint criminal background checks.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                              August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                   DRAFT                                Board Policy #2

REPORTING SUSPECTED CHILD ABUSE/NEGLECT
The Tri Valley Learning Corporation (―TVLC‖) Board recognizes the importance of protecting the total
well-being and safety of each student. The Board affirms its position by supporting the regulations of the
California Penal Code and the California Education Code which define the requirement of TVLC
employees to be trained annually in child abuse identification and reporting.

A. Duty To Report

Certificated employees and classified employees trained in child abuse identification and reporting shall
report known or suspected child abuse to a child protective agency by telephone immediately or as soon
as practically possible and in writing within thirty-six (36) hours of the telephone report. The reporting
duties are individual and cannot be delegated to another individual. (Penal Code 11166)

B. Definitions

1. ―Child Abuse,‖ as defined by law, pursuant to Penal Code 11165, and for purposes of this procedure
includes the following:
a. Physical abuse resulting in a non-accidental physical injury;
b. Physical neglect, including both severe and general neglect, resulting in negligent treatment or
maltreatment of a child;
c. Sexual abuse including both sexual assault and sexual exploitation;
d. Emotional abuse and emotional deprivation including willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment;
e. Severe corporal punishment.

2. ―Mandated Reporters‖ are those people required by law to report suspected instances of child abuse.
The following TVLC employees and contractors are identified as mandated reporters and shall be
trained annually in identifying and reporting child abuse:

Teachers, counselors, instructional aides, food service staff, lunchroom supervisors, playground
supervisors, clerical staff, custodians, nurses, health technicians, child welfare and attendance
workers, psychologists, DUSD employees, child care providers, designated instruction and services
staff, principals, and others as determined by Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖)
administration.

Ensuring that all contract workers have been trained on their duty to report any suspected or known
instances of child abuse will be a contractual requirement of the entity providing the services to
TVLC and/or TPHS.

3. ―Child Protective Agencies‖ are those law enforcement and child protective services responsible for
investigating child abuse reports, including the local police or sheriff’s department, county welfare, or
juvenile probation department and child protective services. (Penal Code 11165)

4. ―Reasonable Suspicion‖ means that it is objectively reasonable for a person to entertain such a
suspicion, based upon facts that could cause a reasonable person in a like position, drawing when
appropriate on his/her training and experience, to suspect child abuse. (Penal Code 11165)

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
C. What Must Be Reported

Knowledge or reasonable suspicion of the following MUST be reported to a child protection agency, no
matter where they occur.

1. Child Neglect

―Child neglect‖ is the negligent treatment or maltreatment of a child by a person responsible for the
child’s welfare under circumstances indicating harm or threatened harm to the child’s health or
welfare. The term includes both acts and omissions on the part of the responsible person.

―Severe neglect‖ means the negligent failure of a person having the care or custody of a child to
protect the child from severe malnutrition or medically diagnosed non-organic failure to thrive. Also
those situations where any person having the care or custody of a child willfully causes or permits the
person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is
endangered, including the intentional failure to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, or medical
care.

―General neglect‖ means the negligent failure of a person having the care or custody of a child to
provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, medical care, or supervision where no physical injury to the
child has occurred.

2. Child Abuse

Child abuse is a broad term which includes the following:
a. Physical injury which is inflicted by other than accidental means on a child by another person;
b. Sexual abuse;
c. Willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment of a child;
d. Unlawful corporal punishment or injury;
e. Neglect of a child in out-of-home care.

There are three types of non-accidental injuries that do not need to be reported:
a. Physical injuries incurred during ―mutual affrays between minors;‖
b. Those caused by reasonable and necessary use of force by a public school employee to stop a
disturbance threatening injury or property damage, for self-defense, or to obtain dangerous
objects in a student’s possession;
c. Those caused by reasonable and necessary force by peace officers acting in the scope of their
employment;

―Unlawful corporal punishment or injury‖ (Physical Abuse) is the willful infliction of cruel or
inhuman corporal punishment or injury resulting in a traumatic physical condition. Corporal
punishment, or physical discipline, is not in and of itself child abuse, and non-injurious spanking to
the buttocks is not prohibited by law; however, when parents or caretakers use corporal punishment
with sufficient force to cause internal or external injuries, this is child abuse.

―Willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment of a child‖ is when any person willfully causes or permits
any child to suffer or inflicts unjustifiable physical pain or mental suffering, or if the person having
the care or custody willfully causes or permits the child or their health to be placed in an endangering
situation.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
Any mandated reporter who has knowledge of or who reasonably suspects that mental suffering has
been inflicted upon a child or that his or her emotional well-being is endangered in any other way
MAY report this; however these reports are NOT mandated.

3. Sexual Abuse

Sexual Abuse includes sexual assault or sexual exploitation.

Conduct described as ―sexual assault‖ can include, but is not limited to, the following:
a. Any penetration, however slight, of the vagina or anal opening of one person by the penis of
another person, whether or not there is the emission of semen;
b. Any sexual contact between the genitals or anal opening of one person and the mouth, lips or
tongue of another person;
c. Any intrusion by one person into the genitals or anal opening of another person, including the use
of any object for this purpose, except when performed for a valid medical purpose;
d. The intentional touching of the genitals or intimate parts (including the breasts, genital area,
groin, inner thighs, and buttocks) or the clothing covering them, of a child, for purposes of sexual
arousal or gratification, except acts which may reasonably be construed to be normal caretaker
responsibilities;
e. The intentional masturbation of the perpetrator’s genitals in the presence of a child.

NOTE: As of January 1, 1998, AB 327 amended the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting
Act to add the following to the class of sexual assault crimes that require mandatory reporting:
a. Unlawful sexual intercourse (statutory rape) with a child under the age of 16 years when the
perpetrator is over the age of 21 years;
b. Lewd and lascivious acts with children ages 14 or 15 by a perpetrator who is more than 10 years
older than the victim.

―Sexual exploitation‖ can include, but is not limited to, prostitution of a child and depicting a minor
engaged in obscene acts for purposes of preparing a film, photograph, negative, slide, drawing,
painting, or other pictorial depiction.

D. Reporting Procedures

1. School employees who have knowledge or observe a child whom he or she reasonably suspects has
been the victim of child abuse, shall report the incident by telephone to:

Alameda County Child Protective Services Emergency Response Unit
(510) 259-1800 (24-Hour Hotline)
If the suspected incident occurred in the child’s home or home of the child’s relative.

OR

Dublin Police Department
(925) 462-1212 (Patrol Officer Response / Dispatch)
If the suspected incident occurred on the child’s way to school, at school, or on the child’s way home
from school.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                              August 1, 2011
If the child’s safety is in danger, report the incident directly to the law enforcement agency where the
incident took place. The child shall be kept at school until Child Protective Services or the law
enforcement agency has been called and a follow-up plan has been determined.

The telephone report must be made immediately or as soon as practically possible upon suspicion.
The verbal report will include:
a. The name of the person making the report;
b. The name of the child;
c. The present location of the child;
d. The nature and extent of any injury;
e. Any other information requested by the child protective agency, including the information that
led the mandated reporter to suspect child abuse;
f. Write in the name of the official contacted in section B of Form SS 8572.

2. Within thirty-six (36) hours of making the telephone report, the school employee shall complete and
mail the Suspected Child Abuse Report Form SS 8572 to the local child protective agency. Child
abuse report forms are available to download from the school’s website and also in the school office.
Completed forms should be mailed to:

Alameda County Children and Family Services
Attn: (Name of official contacted in section B of Form SS 8572)
24100 Amador Street
Hayward, CA 94544

For additional information contact:

Director -Alameda County Child Abuse Prevention Council
Phone: (510) 780-8989
Fax: (510) 780-8710
QIC Code: 50305

3. School employees reporting child abuse to a child protective agency are encouraged, but not required,
to notify the school principal or designee as soon as possible after the initial verbal report by
telephone.

If the principal is so notified he/she shall provide the school employee with any assistance necessary
to ensure that the verbal or written reporting procedures are carried out according to State law and
TVLC policy. If requested by the school employee, the principal may assist in the completion and
filing of these forms. (Penal Code 11166, 11167)

E. Legal Responsibility and Liability

1. School employees required to report are not civilly or criminally liable for filing a required or
authorized report of known or suspected child abuse. (Penal Code 11172)

2. The school employee who fails to report an instance of child abuse which he/she knows to exist or
reasonably should know to exist is guilty of a misdemeanor and is punishable by confinement in jail
for a term not to exceed six (6) months or by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000) or
both. The school employee may also be held civilly liable for damages for any injury to the child
after failure to report. (Penal Code 11172)

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
3. When two (2) or more persons are required to report jointly, have knowledge of a suspected instance
of child abuse, and when there is agreement among them, the telephone report may be made by any
one of them who is selected by mutual agreement, and a single report may be made and signed by the
person selected. However, if any person who knows or should know that the person designated to
report failed to do so, that person then has a duty to make the report. (Penal Code 11166)

4. The duty to report child abuse is an individual duty and no supervisor or principal shall impede or
inhibit such reporting duties. Furthermore, no person making such a report shall be subject to any
sanction. (Penal Code 11166.1)

F. Release of Child to Peace Officer

When a child is released to a peace officer and taken into custody as a victim of suspected child abuse,
TPHS shall provide the peace officer with the address and telephone number of the child’s parent or
guardian. It is the responsibility of the peace officer to promptly notify the parent or guardian of the
situation. Though the principal is not required to do so, the principal may use his/her discretion in
notifying the parent or guardian of the removal of their child from school. Peace officers will be asked to
sign an assumption of responsibility form. (E.C. 48906)

Legal References: California Penal Code, Section 11161-11174, E.C. 48906

38
Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                            August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                  DRAFT                               Board Policy #3

NO SMOKING
Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (―TVLC‖), recognizing health and safety hazards associated with
smoking and in accordance with federal and state law, prohibits smoking or other tobacco use in all
school buildings, on school property (including vehicles located on school premises) or at any school-
sponsored event. Placards clearly announcing this policy will be prominently posted in all Tassajara
Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) facilities.

39
Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                           August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                   DRAFT                                 Board Policy #4

TUBERCULOSIS (TB) TESTING
Students who have never attended a California school must present written evidence of testing for
tuberculosis (TB) that shows them to be free of active TB prior to entering school. All kindergarten
students must have TB testing completed within one year prior to the first day of school.

School personnel to be tested include employees and independent contractors who provide direct services
to students on behalf of the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (‖TVLC‖), including but not limited to
teachers, nurses, principals, physicians, dentists, dental hygienists, custodians, janitors, cooks, cafeteria
workers, bus drivers, librarians, psychologists, audiologists, counselors, substitute teachers, student
teachers, and Registered Volunteers who provide direct services to students on behalf of the school.

―Registered Volunteers‖ are volunteers of Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) who have
successfully completed a fingerprint criminal background check and have been cleared by school
administration to work with students in a volunteer capacity.

All employees of TVLC and Registered Volunteers of TPHS must submit written proof from a physician
of an examination for tuberculosis (TB) within the last two years showing that they are free of active TB.
The examination for tuberculosis consists of an approved intradermal TB test which, if positive, will be
followed by an x-ray of the lungs, or in the absence of skin testing, an x-ray of the lungs. All employees
and Registered Volunteers will be required to undergo TB examination at least once every two years.
Food handlers will be required to have annual TB exams. Documentation of employee and volunteer
compliance with TB exams will be kept on file in the office. This requirement also includes contract food
handlers, substitute teachers, and student teachers serving under the supervision of an educator.

TB examination is a condition of initial employment with TVLC and the cost of the exam will be borne
by the applicant. TVLC will provide for the subsequent TB testing for its employees.

TB examination is a condition of becoming a Registered Volunteer with TVLC. The cost of the exam
will be borne by the volunteer applicant. In the event of financial hardship, TPHS administration may
provide for TB testing free of cost for the volunteer applicant.

Any entity providing student services to TVLC and/or TPHS will be contractually required to ensure that
all contract workers have had TB testing that shows them to be free of active TB prior to conducting work
with TPHS students.

References:
California Education Code 44839
California Education Code 49406
California Health and Safety Code 1596.794

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                              August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                  DRAFT                                Board Policy #5

SAFE FACILITIES
Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) will be housed in a facility that has received State Fire
Marshall approval and has been evaluated by a qualified structural engineer, who has determined that the
facilities present no substantial seismic hazard. TPHS will not take possession of any facility that does
not have all appropriate inspections and a valid Certificate of Occupancy. The Safe Facilities procedures
will include provisions for periodic inspection and testing of the structure(s) and associated life safety
systems.

Surveys and management plans will be maintained and updated for all hazardous building materials (e.g.,
lead, asbestos, etc.) and all hazardous materials used and stored in and around the school will be handled
and dispensed properly. Additionally, appropriate training for staff working with hazardous materials
(e.g., pesticides, herbicides, cleaning chemicals, etc.) will be provided. A comprehensive indoor air
quality program modeled after school programs developed by the Environmental Protection Agency will
be implemented and maintained.

Inspections will be performed to ensure that daily operations do not compromise facility safety and health
in any manner. The inspections will include, but are not limited to, safe access/egress paths (both routine
and emergency), access to emergency equipment, eliminating obstructions to airflow, and ensuring that
there is no disturbance of hazardous building materials.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                            August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                    DRAFT                                  Board Policy #6

EMERGENCY PLANS
Disaster Plan

Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) shall (1) develop and adopt a plan to ensure the school’s
preparation to meet disasters, a plan based on the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS)
which conforms with the emergency and disaster plans of the local civil defense agency; and (2) provide
for all members of the certificated and classified staff of the school and all pupils enrolled in the school
the instruction they need to be fully informed regarding all phases of the plan and the responsibilities they
are to assume should either a man-made or natural disaster occur in the school or in the area in which the
school is located.

SEMS (State Emergency Management System) is a system developed to help all state, government,
hospitals, school districts, fire departments, police departments and businesses to organize their personnel
in such a way that is common among all and to streamline the response system.

Incident Command Job Action Sheets Defined

Positions:
Incident Commander (IC) – Organizes and directs the operations of the Incident Command Center. Gives
overall direction for school operations and, if needed, authorizes evacuation. Works cooperatively with
external agencies.

Command Center Recorder – Records incident-related activities/problems and any other documentation
necessary as directed by the Incident Commander. Records and maintains documentation on disaster
status board.

Public Information Officer (PIO) – Provides information to the news media.

Operations Section Leader – Organizes and directs aspects relating to the operations section. Carries out
directives of the IC. Coordinates and directs teams to carry out tasks required to secure a safe
environment.

Search & Rescue – Leads and directs search and rescue operations in a safe manner so as to prevent
further injury or loss. Reports and coordinates efforts with fire department.

Safety & Security Officer – Monitors and has authority over safety of search and rescue operations and
hazardous conditions. Organizes and enforces scene/facility protection and traffic control. Erects barriers
as needed to provide a safe and secure site for various operations.

Student Tracking/Discharge Leader – Works with Student Tracking Officer to coordinate: time of
removal, name and signature of person making removal, source of identification from persons making
removal, cross checks of this information with the emergency release forms. It should also have notation
as to where the student will be going (i.e., home, relatives, work, neighbor, telephone number where they
can be contacted).

First Aid/Triage – Sets up first aid station. Sorts casualties according to priority of injuries and assures
their disposition to the proper treatment area.
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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                               August 1, 2011
Damage Assessment & Control Officer – Provides sufficient information regarding the operational status
of the facility for the purpose of decision/policy making, including those regarding full or partial
evacuation. Identifies safe areas where students and staff can be moved if needed. Manages fire
suppression, search & rescue and damage mitigation activities.

Logistics Section Leader – Organizes and directs those operations associated with maintenance of the
physical environment and adequate levels of food, shelter, and supplies to support the school objectives.

Communications Leader – Organizes and coordinates internal and external communications; acts as
custodian for all incoming communications. Logs/documents and distributes communications to IC.
Works with Ham operators, walkie-talkies, and organizes the placement of ground-air communication
signals.

Manpower Pool Leader – Collects and inventories available staff and volunteers at a central point.
Receives requests and assigns available staff as needed. Maintains adequate numbers of staff to assist as
needs arise. Assists in the maintenance of staff morale. Sees that staff gets breaks or relief as needed.

Resource Manager – Works with Manpower Pool Leader to organize, assess, and assign to areas of need
all community volunteers according to their skills and training. Organizes and distributes donations from
the community.

Supplies & Distribution Leader – Organizes and dispenses food and water stores for consumption.
Rations supplies as needed, depending on duration of incident.

Sanitation & Shelter – Evaluates and monitors the potency of existing sewage and sanitation systems.
Enacts pre-established alternate methods of waste disposal if necessary. Sets up shelter as needed.

Transportation Unit Leader – Organizes and coordinates the transportation of human & material resources
to and from the school. Secures school personnel to travel with students that need to be transported to a
medical facility. Secures routes for entrance and exit of emergency vehicles.

Psychological Support Unit Leader – Provides psychological, spiritual, and emotional support to school
staff, students, and families. Initiates and organizes the Critical Stress Debriefing process.

Planning Section Chief – Organizes and directs all aspects of Planning Section operations. Ensures the
distribution of critical information/data. Compiles scenario/resource projections from all section chiefs
and effects long-range planning. Documents and distributes facility action plan.

School Site Evacuation – Plans and organizes the evacuation of students from school site to sister school.
Prepares site for accepting students from sister school.

Finance Leader – Monitors the utilization of financial assets. Maintains documentation of personnel time
records. Supervises the documentation of expenditures relevant to the emergency incident.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                            August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                  DRAFT                                Board Policy #7

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL
The Tri Valley Learning Corporation (―TVLC‖) Board recognizes its responsibility to protect the health
of its students and employees as well as to uphold their individual rights. The TVLC Board is also aware
of the public’s concern regarding the admittance of students with communicable diseases. A
communicable disease is one that is sufficiently contagious so as to expose students to an unacceptably
high level of risk to their health and well being.

TVLC is committed to a positive approach in dealing with communicable diseases. Our purpose is to:

 Provide a supportive environment for and prevent unfair treatment of persons
affected by a communicable disease;
 Ensure that adequate measures are taken to reduce the chance of disease
transmission in the school setting;
 Set out a commitment to disease prevention through appropriate health education in
the school.

Confidentiality

It is recognized that people with long term chronic communicable diseases are often healthy and are able
to work and study. Staff and students at any stage of infection with most communicable diseases do not
pose a health risk to others in the school setting. Confidentiality of communicable disease status of any
member of the school community will be maintained at all times, within the terms of notifiable disease
regulations.

The number of school personnel informed of the student’s condition will be limited by the Principal to
those essential in ensuring the proper care of the child and in protecting against transmission of the
disease.

Admission Requirements

Prior to the start of school, new students must submit a California immunization certificate and a
Physician Examination Form completed by their doctor. Students are expected to be in compliance with
the California immunization schedule. Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) is required to
exclude children from school who are out of compliance with the state immunization schedule.

Exposure Control

The parent(s)/guardian(s) of a student with a communicable disease or infestation should notify the school
as soon as they have knowledge of their child’s condition. School guidelines for exclusion due to a
communicable disease will follow recommendations from local, state, and federal agencies that address
communicable disease standards. The determination regarding the conditions under which a child may or
may not attend school will be made on a case-by-case basis by the principal, or designee, in concert with
the child’s parent/guardian and the child’s physician. A parent/guardian may appeal the decision of the
Principal to exclude their child from school to the TVLC Board by way of the uniform appeal policy.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                           August 1, 2011
The risk of transmitting bloodborne pathogens, including Hepatitis B and C, HIV or AIDS is extremely
low in school settings when standard precautions to prevent disease transmission are followed. TVLC
has developed an exposure control plan designed to protect employees and students from possible
infection due to contact with bloodborne pathogens during first aid treatment and potential emergency
response.

Education

TPHS will embrace an integrated school, parent, and community approach for enhancing the health and
well-being of students. TPHS will actively solicit parent involvement and engage community resources
and services to respond more effectively to the health-related needs of students.

A comprehensive health education curriculum will include such topics as personal health and prevention
and control of diseases. Qualified, trained teachers shall provide health education.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                         August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                    DRAFT                                  Board Policy #8

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES
The Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (―TVLC‖) Board of Directors recognizes the importance of taking
appropriate preventative or remedial measures to minimize accidents or illness at school or during school-
sponsored activities. To this end, Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) expects parents/guardians
to provide emergency information for their children and keep such information current in order to
facilitate immediate contact with parents/guardians if an accident or illness occurs.

First Aid and CPR

All classrooms will be equipped with a First Aid Kit containing appropriate supplies. First aid will be
administered whenever necessary by trained staff members. When necessary, the appropriate emergency
personnel will be called to assist.

All staff is to be certified in adult and pediatric CPR and First Aid and be recertified prior to expiration of
certificates. Opportunities for adult and pediatric CPR and First Aid training will be offered to TPHS
Registered Volunteers.

Resuscitation Orders

School employees are trained and expected to respond to emergency situations. If any student needs
resuscitation, staff shall make every effort to resuscitate him/her.

The Principal, or designee, shall ensure that all parents/guardians are informed of this policy.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                                August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                  DRAFT                                Board Policy #9

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN
It is the policy of Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (―TVLC‖) to protect the health and well-being of its
employees to the greatest extent possible. This is accomplished by eliminating all hazards in the working
environment that may be removed and by ensuring that all employees are made fully aware of those that
remain. In rare instances involving first aid situations, work at Tassajara Preparatory High School
(―TPHS‖) could conceivably involve contact with blood or other infectious materials. It is important that
employees who may come into contact with blood or infectious materials be educated and alerted to the
possible sources of infection and the individual hazards associated with them. Employees will be made
aware of bloodborne diseases and their modes of transmission, trained in the School’s exposure control
plan (including engineering and work practice controls and required personal protective equipment), and
provided with Hepatitis B vaccinations when needed. Training will also include appropriate response
measures for emergencies involving blood, handling of incidents involving suspected exposures, and
proper handling, labeling, and storage of potentially infectious wastes.

This written Exposure Control Plan for Bloodborne Pathogens will be available in the program manager’s
office for review by all employees, their designated agents, and representatives of regulatory agencies.

Plan Summary

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) has instituted a standard to
protect employees from occupational exposure to biological hazards. This standard (8 CCR 5193) is
called ―Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens‖.

The risk of infection by bloodborne pathogens is dependent on the likelihood of exposure to blood and
other potentially infectious materials.

This Exposure Control Plan for Bloodborne Pathogens has been produced in accordance with 29 CFR
1910.1030 and 8 CCR 5193. Under this plan, TVLC will provide information to its employees concerning
procedures to be employed whenever the potential exists for infection in the workplace.

An occupational exposure is defined as any reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or
parental contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance
of an employee’s duties. Employees at risk from occupational exposure to blood at TPHS include those
who are first aid or CPR trained and named by the company as designated first-aid providers.
(Employees who render such aid as ―Good Samaritans” are not covered under this standard.) This
program is also extended to cover maintenance employees with a reasonable likelihood of contact with
raw sewage, considered by a conservative interpretation to be a potentially infectious material.

Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Program Manager

(Insert Name) has been designated to be the program manager for TPHS’s Exposure Control Plan for
Bloodborne Pathogens, and is responsible for the administration and implementation of this plan.

The Bloodborne Pathogen Program (BPP) manager has the responsibility and authority for the overall
Bloodborne Pathogens Program throughout the company. The BPP manager functions as the liaison with
OSHA officials and company employees with questions or problems pertaining to the standard. (Insert

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                            August 1, 2011
Name) is responsible for the training and record keeping associated with this program. The BBP program
manager may select designated assistants to help implement the program.

Employee Responsibility

The effectiveness of any Exposure Control Plan is dependent on the receptiveness and commitment of
each employee involved in the plan. Each employee of TPHS must therefore be alerted to the potential
hazards present in the work environment and follow TPHS’s Code of Safe and Healthy Work Practices at
all times. Any time that a question arises concerning the transmission of bloodborne pathogens, the
company’s Exposure Control Plan should be consulted before proceeding. Any remaining questions
should be directed to the BBP program manager.

Exposure Determination

“Occupational Exposure” is any reasonably anticipated potential for an employee’s skin, eye, mucous
membrane, etc. to come into contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials in performance of
the employee’s job duties. (Note that “Good Samaritan” acts such as assisting a co-worker with a nose
bleed would not be considered occupational exposure.) The following personnel and job categories are
designated first aid providers or are otherwise considered to be at risk of exposure during administration
of first aid or CPR or in performance of routine job duties.

<List of personnel and job categories>

Schedules and Methods of Implementation

The BBP Standard requires that the employer establish and maintain schedules and methods of
implementation for all provisions of this standard. They include:

I.   Preventive Measures

1. Universal Precautions: The keystone of this infection control program is that all human blood as
well as certain other body fluids are to be handled as if known to be infected with Human
Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis-B Virus (HBV), or other bloodborne pathogens. Universal
precautions include the following:
• Employees with possible contact with potentially infectious materials must wear protective
gloves when performing duties which could conceivably cause exposure.
• Discarded gloves must be handled as infectious waste according to applicable regulations.
• Hands should be washed thoroughly before and after wearing protective gloves.
• Employees potentially exposed to aerosolized infectious material should wear protective masks
and eye wear. Goggles are the recommended protective eye wear.
• Eye wear must be disinfected after each use.
• Employees potentially exposed to infectious material should wear protective clothing.
Contaminated clothing shall be discarded immediately after use and exposed skin shall be washed
as soon as reasonably possible.
• Discarded, potentially infectious clothing must be labeled and stored in a secure area, and must be
handled and laundered or incinerated according to Center for Disease Control guidelines utilizing
universal precautions.
• All surfaces potentially contaminated with infectious materials must be carefully disinfected
immediately. Soap and water, bleach or hydrogen peroxide are all good disinfecting agents.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                           August 1, 2011
•   All waste that is contaminated with blood or other body fluids shall be treated as contaminated or
infectious waste and must be discarded in a manner that prevents contamination of personnel or
equipment and in accordance with state and local ordinances.

2. Hepatitis B Vaccination: An effective vaccination against the Hepatitis B Virus has been developed
and will be made available to all potentially exposed personnel as follows:
• Hepatitis B vaccination shall be made available to all occupationally exposed employees. In
addition, post-exposure evaluation and periodic follow-up evaluations are to be made available to
all covered employees who experience an exposure incident. While OSHA’s intent is to have the
covered employees receive the vaccination prior to the incident of exposure, it is the employee’s
option to receive the vaccination as a follow-up program.
• Hepatitis B vaccination shall be made available to all occupationally exposed employees
immediately after the required training has been provided.
• Employees who can demonstrate that they are already immune to HBV need not accept
vaccination.
• An employee’s signing of the Hepatitis B vaccination Employee Declination Statement at the time
the vaccination is made available does not relieve the employer from the requirement to provide
the vaccine at a later date.
• The vaccination shall be made available to employees at no cost to the covered employees or their
medical insurance.

II. Exposure Controls

The use of exposure controls will be mandatory in order to eliminate or minimize employee exposure
whenever feasible. The BBP program manager shall annually (or more frequently if deemed necessary)
evaluate the effectiveness of the current controls in use while the covered employees are administering
first aid or CPR.

1. Engineering Controls
• TPHS will have washing facilities available at all work sites. These are to be utilized after all
potential exposures.
• In areas where appropriate washing facilities are not immediately accessible, first aid stations
shall be equipped with antiseptic hand cleaner and wipes.

2. Administrative Controls
• All covered employees shall be required to attend Bloodborne Pathogens and First Aid / CPR
training prior to bring named to any Emergency Response Team or as a first aid provider.
• All covered employees are required to wash all affected areas of their body after rendering first
aid or CPR.
• Immediately following completion of disinfection procedures, the BBP program manager shall be
notified and a determination made regarding the need for vaccination.
• Surfaces shall be disinfected if contamination with potentially infectious material occurs or is
suspected.
• Broken glass, exposed needles, or other sharp objects shall not be picked up with bare, exposed
hands. Brooms (or other adequate means) shall be used to avoid direct contact with potentially
contaminated objects. All sharp objects will be stored in a puncture-resistant container.

3. Personal Protective Equipment:
TPHS will provide personal protective equipment (PPE) at no cost to the employee. If an employee
believes he/she needs a specific article of personal protective equipment specific to individual duties,

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
the covered employee should contact the BBP program manager and request the necessary equipment
at that time. Street clothes are not considered personal protective equipment. The BBP program
manager will make sure that appropriate sizes of personal protective equipment are available to the
employees.
• TPHS will have appropriate PPE to protect employees from potential bloodborne pathogens
available in association with all first aid kits.
• TPHS requires the use of personal protective equipment during any first aid procedures provided
to an injured victim. The sole exception to this is a situation in which an employee uses his/her
best judgment to make the determination that any delay caused by obtaining such equipment
could exacerbate a life-threatening condition.
• All personal protective equipment shall be maintained in good repair and replaced as necessary.
• Gloves shall be worn any time the potential for exposure to infectious material exists. Single use
gloves shall not be reused.
• Eye protection devices such as goggles or face shields shall be worn for all procedures involving
potentially infectious fluids.
• Gowns, aprons, and other protective clothing must be appropriate to the task and degree of
potential exposure.
• TPHS shall ensure that all personal protective equipment is cleaned, laundered, and/or disposed
of properly.

III. Housekeeping / Regulated Waste:

TPHS shall ensure that work sites are maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. TPHS requires proper
decontamination and/or disinfection after all potential exposures.

1. All working surfaces and equipment shall be cleaned and decontaminated after contact with blood or
other potentially infectious or hazardous materials.
2. Regulated waste must be properly contained, labeled, stored, and discarded to minimize the
possibility of transmission of disease to workers.

IV. Informational Programs:

TPHS requires attachment of proper warning labels to containers of regulated waste or other potentially
infectious materials. Biohazard labels must be used to identify all potentially infectious agents or blood.
These labels consist of a fluorescent orange or orange-red symbol with the word “biohazard” in the same
coloring below.

1. Signs must be used to identify restricted areas. TPHS job sites have biohazard labels for use in
identification of all containers of potentially infectious material and areas used to store them. These
warning signs contain the name and telephone number of the supervisor of that work area or other
responsible persons. Labels are available through the Safety Committee.
2. TPHS has instituted a Hazard Communication Program which provides additional information
pertaining to specific hazards inherent in the workplace to all potentially affected employees.
3. TPHS has instituted an Injury and Illness Prevention Program detailing a system of identification and
correction of all workplace hazards, including those associated with bloodborne pathogens.
4. TPHS has instituted a Respiratory Protection Program detailing the qualification, training, and
evaluation of employees who may be required to utilize respiratory protection on a job site.
5. TPHS has instituted a Medical Surveillance Program which provides for medical monitoring of
individuals who are potentially exposed to any pathogenic or otherwise hazardous materials on a job
site.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
V. Training:

TPHS requires that all employees with potential occupational exposure participate in a training program
which will be provided to our employees at no cost. TPHS will hold the training during working hours
and notify those who shall attend approximately one week ahead of time. Records of this and all training
will be maintained for every employee at TPHS. These records will identify the instructor(s) and will
detail the date(s) of training, the material presented, and the names and job titles of all persons who
attended the training sessions. The BBP Coordinator will keep the employee training records on file for a
minimum of three years subsequent to the date of training.

VI. Record Keeping:

TPHS has established and maintains an accurate medical record for every employee with potential
occupational exposure to pathogenic or otherwise hazardous materials (GISO 5193). These records will
include, in detail, a copy of all results of examinations, medical testing, and all follow-up procedures.
Also included are the individual’s name, social security number and a copy of his or her Hepatitis B
vaccination status. A copy of the health care professional’s written opinion pertinent to each employee’s
fitness for duty is also included, as well as a copy of the employee’s medical history. TPHS requires that
all employee records are to be kept strictly confidential. The information within the records is never to be
disclosed unless written consent has been granted by the employee (GISO 3204). TPHS will keep all
medical records pertaining to a given employee for the duration of his or her employment plus an
additional thirty years.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                    DRAFT                               Board Policy #10

VISITORS ON CAMPUS
All visitors to the Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) campus are required to sign in and sign
out through the school office. This policy will be strictly enforced so that we are able to account for all
individuals on campus at any given time. During sign-in, visitors must state their business on campus and
their destination and will then be issued a badge by office staff. Identification badges must be visible at
all times. At the conclusion of the visitor’s business on campus he/she is required to return to the school
office to sign out and return his/her visitor badge.

Campus Visitor Policy

1. All campus visitors must first report to the school office.
2. Signage regarding the campus visitation policy will be posted at conspicuous locations throughout
campus.
3. TPHS reserves the right to refuse campus visitation privileges to anyone at the discretion of the
principal or designee.
4. Visitor sign-in/sign-out sheets are located in the school office.
5. The visitor is required to print the date, their name, a contact phone number, and their destination on
campus on the visitor sign-in/sign-out sheet.
6. Office staff will issue a visitor badge and note the visitor’s time of arrival, the assigned badge
number, and place his/her initials for issuance of the badge in the appropriate space on the sign-in
sheet.
7. The visitor will be escorted to their designated area on campus by school staff or by a Registered
Volunteer at the direction of school staff.
8. At the conclusion of the visitor’s business he/she will return to the office to sign out and return his/her
visitor badge.
9. Office staff will collect the visitor badge and note the visitor’s time of departure and will initial in the
appropriate space for return of the badge.
10. At the conclusion of each school day, office staff will check to make sure that all visitor badges have
been returned. If a badge has not been returned, office staff will attempt to contact the visitor to
arrange for badge return. If office staff is unable to contact the visitor, they will complete an incident
report and the principal or designee will be notified.
11. Special arrangements will be made for visitor control during school functions that involve large
groups of individuals visiting the campus for a scheduled event. Supervision of the group as a whole
will be provided by staff and Registered Volunteers brought in for the occasion.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                               August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                   DRAFT                              Board Policy #11

MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION
The Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (―TVLC‖) Board of Directors recognizes that some students may
need medication during the school day. Medication can allow a student with special health care needs to
attend school and benefit from instruction.

The TVLC Board recognizes that whenever possible it is best for students to take medication at home
rather than at school. In the event medication is required during the school day, staff designated by the
Principal, or designee, may assist the student if the school receives written approval from the physician
and the parent/guardian. Injectable medications shall only be administered by qualified designated
personnel that have been trained by a physician.

On a case-by-case basis, after consulting with the child’s physician and parent/guardian, the Principal, or
designee, may allow a student to carry self-administered medication. This is allowed only if the proper
documentation is on file in the health office. Written approval for the child to carry and use any
medication is required from the child’s physician. Self-carry forms must be signed by the
parent/guardian, student, and physician and shall be renewed annually.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
Health & Safety                                  DRAFT                              Board Policy #12

STUDENT HEALTH EXAMINATIONS AND IMMUNIZATIONS
Health Examinations

The Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (―TVLC‖) Board of Directors believes that periodic health
examinations of students may lead to the detection and treatment of conditions that impact learning.
Health examinations also may help in determining whether special adaptations of the school program are
necessary.

In addition to verifying that students have complied with legal requirements for health examinations and
immunizations before enrolling at Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖), the school shall
administer tests for vision, hearing, and scoliosis as required by law.

The Principal shall ensure that staff employed to examine students exercise proper care of each student
and that examination results are kept confidential. Records related to these examinations shall be
available only in accordance with law.

Reports to the TVLC Board regarding the number of students found to have physical problems and the
effort made to correct them shall in no way reveal the identity of the students.

Immunizations

To protect the health of all students and staff and to curtail the spread of infectious diseases, the TVLC
Board desires to cooperate with state and local health agencies to encourage immunization of all students
against preventable diseases.

Students entering TPHS shall present an immunization record which shows at least the month and year of
each immunization the student has received, in accordance with law. Students shall be excluded from
school or exempted from immunization requirements only as allowed by law.

Each student shall present his/her immunization record certifying that he/she has received all required
immunizations currently due before he/she is admitted to TPHS.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                            August 1, 2011
APPENDIX I – DRAFT SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION POLICIES
(See also VIII. Disciplinary Action, Suspensions, and Expulsions in Appendix O – Family-Student
Handbook and VII.D – Pupil Suspension and Expulsion in the Main Petition.)

SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION POLICY

This Pupil Suspension and Expulsion Policy has been established in order to promote learning and protect
the safety and well-being of all students. When the Policy is violated, it may be necessary to suspend or
expel a student from regular classroom instruction.

Staff shall enforce disciplinary rules and procedures fairly and consistently amongst all students. This
Policy and its Administrative Procedures will be printed and distributed as part of the Student Handbook
and will clearly describe discipline expectations.

Discipline includes but is not limited to advising and counseling students, conferring with
parents/guardians, detention during and after school hours, the use of alternative educational
environments, suspension and expulsion.

Corporal punishment shall not be used as a disciplinary measure against any student. Corporal
punishment includes the willful infliction of, or willfully causing the infliction of, physical pain on a
student. For purposes of the policy, corporal punishment does not include use of force that is reasonable
and necessary to protect the employee, students, staff or other persons or to prevent damage to school
property.

The Principal shall ensure that students and their parents/guardians are notified in writing upon
enrollment of all discipline policies and procedures. The notice shall state that this Policy and
Administrative Procedures are available on request at the Principal’s office.

Suspended or expelled students shall be excluded from all school and school-related activities during the
period of suspension or expulsion unless otherwise agreed.

A student identified as an individual with disabilities or for whom the School has a basis of knowledge of
a suspected disability pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (―IDEA‖) or who is
qualified for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) is subject to the
same grounds for suspension and expulsion and is accorded the same due process procedures applicable
to regular education students except when federal and state law mandates additional or different
procedures. The School will follow Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Individuals with Disabilities in
Education Act (IDEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and all federal and state laws
when imposing any form of discipline on a student identified as an individual with disabilities or for
whom the School has a basis of knowledge of a suspected disability or who is otherwise qualified for
such services or protections in according due process to such students. As applicable, these procedures
may include but are not limited to a behavior intervention plan, a functional behavioral assessment, and a
manifestation determination to consider whether the behavior is a manifestation of the disability; and

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                                August 1, 2011
whether the student was appropriately placed at the time the behavior occurred. No student with
exceptional needs may be expelled or be suspended for more than 10 days consecutively or receive a
series of suspensions which combined would be considered a change of placement, unless the behavior is
not a manifestation of the disability and the student was properly placed at the time the behavior occurred.

Administrative Procedures For Pupil Suspension And Expulsion
A. Definitions (as used in this policy)
1. ―Board‖ means governing body of the Charter School.
2. ―Expulsion‖ means disenrollment from the Charter School.
3. ―School day‖ means a day upon which the Charter School is in session or weekdays during the
summer recess.
4. ―Suspension‖ means removal of a pupil from ongoing instruction for adjustment purposes. However,
―suspension‖ does not mean the following:
a. Reassignment to another education program or class at the Charter School where the pupil will
receive continuing instruction for the length of day prescribed by the Charter School Board for
pupils of the same grade level.
b. Referral to a certificated employee designated by the Principal to advise pupils.
c. Removal from the class but without reassignment to another class for the remainder of the class
period without sending the pupil to the Principal or designee.
5. ―Pupil‖ includes a pupil’s parent or guardian or legal counsel or other representative.
6. ―School‖ means the Charter School.

B. Grounds for Suspension and Expulsion of Students
A student may be suspended or expelled for prohibited misconduct if the act is related to school activity
or school attendance occurring at the School or at any other school or a School sponsored event at any
time including but not limited to: a) while on school grounds; b) while going to or coming from school; c)
during the lunch period, whether on or off the school campus; d) during, going to, or coming from a
school-sponsored activity.
In preparing the lists of enumerated offenses listed in subparagraphs (C) and (D) below and the
procedures specified in subparagraphs (E) and (G), TPHS has reviewed the lists of offenses and
procedures that apply to students attending non-charter public schools. TPHS believes their proposed
lists of enumerated offenses and procedures provide adequate safety for students, staff, and visitors to the
school and serve the best interests the school’s pupils and their parents (guardians).

C. Enumerated Offenses for Suspension
Students may be suspended for any of the following acts when it is determined that the pupil:
1. Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened to cause physical injury to another person or willfully used
force or violence upon the person of another, except in self-defense.
2. Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any firearm, knife, explosive, or other dangerous object
unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the student had obtained written
permission to possess the item from a certificated school employee, with the Principal/Administrator
or designee’s concurrence.

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3. Unlawfully possessed, used, sold or otherwise furnished, or was under the influence of, any
controlled substance as defined in Health and Safety Code 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage, or
intoxicant of any kind.
4. Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any controlled substance as defined in Health and
Safety Code 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant of any kind, and then sold, delivered or
otherwise furnished to any person another liquid substance or material and represented same as
controlled substance, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant.
5. Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion.
6. Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or private property.
7. Stole or attempted to steal school property or private property.
8. Possessed or used tobacco or any products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including but not
limited to cigars, cigarettes, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew
packets and betel.
9. Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity or vulgarity.
10. Unlawfully possessed or unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any drug paraphernalia, as
defined in Health and Safety Code 11014.5.
11. Disrupted school activities or otherwise willfully defied the valid authority of supervisors, teachers,
administrators, other school officials, or other school personnel engaged in the performance of their
duties.
12. Knowingly received stolen school property or private property.
13. Possessed an imitation firearm, i.e., a replica of a firearm that is so substantially similar in physical
properties to an existing firearm as to lead a reasonable person to conclude that the replica is a
firearm.
14. Committed or attempted to commit a sexual assault as defined in Penal Code 261, 266c, 286, 288,
288a or 289, or committed a sexual battery as defined in Penal Code 243.4.
15. Harassed, threatened, or intimidated a student who is a complaining witness or witness in a school
disciplinary proceeding for the purpose of preventing that student from being a witness and/or
retaliating against that student for being a witness.
16. Made terrorist threats against school officials and/or school property.
17. Committed sexual harassment.
18. Caused, attempted to cause, threatened to cause, or participated in an act of hate violence.
19. Intentionally harassed, threatened or intimidated a student or group of students to the extent of having
the actual and reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting class work, creating substantial
disorder, and invading student rights by creating an intimidating or hostile educational environment.
The above list is not exhaustive and depending upon the offense, a pupil may be suspended or expelled
for misconduct not specified above.
Alternatives to suspension will first be attempted with students who are truant, tardy, or otherwise absent
from assigned school activities.

D. Enumerated Offenses for Expulsion
Students may be expelled for any of the following acts when it is determined that the pupil:

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                                August 1, 2011
1. Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened to cause physical injury to another person or willfully used
force or violence upon the person of another, except in self-defense.
2. Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any firearm, knife, explosive, or other dangerous object
unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the student had obtained written
permission to possess the item from a certificated school employee, with the Principal/Administrator
or designee’s concurrence.
3. Unlawfully possessed, used, sold or otherwise furnished, or was under the influence of, any
controlled substance as defined in Health and Safety Code 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage, or
intoxicant of any kind.
4. Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any controlled substance as defined in Health and
Safety Code 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant of any kind, and then sold, delivered or
otherwise furnished to any person another liquid substance or material and represented same as
controlled substance, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant.
5. Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion.
6. Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or private property.
7. Stole or attempted to steal school property or private property.
8. Possessed or used tobacco or any products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including but not
limited to cigars, cigarettes, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew
packets and betel.
9. Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity or vulgarity.
10. Unlawfully possessed or unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any drug paraphernalia, as
defined in Health and Safety Code 11014.5.
11. Disrupted school activities or otherwise willfully defied the valid authority of supervisors, teachers,
administrators, other school officials, or other school personnel engaged in the performance of their
duties.
12. Knowingly received stolen school property or private property.
13. Possessed an imitation firearm, i.e., a replica of a firearm that is so substantially similar in physical
properties to an existing firearm as to lead a reasonable person to conclude that the replica is a
firearm.
14. Committed or attempted to commit a sexual assault as defined in Penal Code 261, 266c, 286, 288,
288a or 289, or committed a sexual battery as defined in Penal Code 243.4.
15. Harassed, threatened, or intimidated a student who is a complaining witness or witness in a school
disciplinary proceeding for the purpose of preventing that student from being a witness and/or
retaliating against that student for being a witness.
16. Made terrorist threats against school officials and/or school property.
17. Committed sexual harassment.
18. Caused, attempted to cause, threatened to cause, or participated in an act of hate violence.
19. Intentionally harassed, threatened or intimidated a student or group of students to the extent of having
the actual and reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting class work, creating substantial
disorder, and invading student rights by creating an intimidating or hostile educational environment.
The above list is not exhaustive and depending upon the offense, a pupil may be suspended or expelled
for misconduct not specified above.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                                August 1, 2011
Alternatives to expulsion will first be attempted with students who are truant, tardy, or otherwise absent
from assigned school activities.

E. Suspension Procedure
Suspensions shall be initiated according to the following procedures.
1. Informal Conference
Suspension shall be preceded, if possible, by an informal conference conducted by the Principal or the
Principal’s designee with the student and his or her parent and, whenever practicable, the teacher,
supervisor or school employee who referred the student to the Principal.
The conference may be omitted if the Principal or designee determines that an emergency situation
exists. An ―emergency situation‖ involves a clear and present danger to the lives, safety or health of
students or school personnel. If a student is suspended without this conference, both the
parent/guardian and student shall be notified of the student’s right to return to school for the purpose
of a conference.
At the conference, the pupil shall be informed of the reason for the disciplinary action and the
evidence against him or her and shall be given the opportunity to present his or her version and
evidence in his or her defense.
This conference shall be held within two school days, unless the pupil waives this right or is
physically unable to attend for any reason, including, but not limited to incarceration or
hospitalization.
No penalties may be imposed on a pupil for failure of the pupil’s parent or guardian to attend a
conference with school officials. Reinstatement of the suspended pupil shall not be contingent upon
attendance by the pupil’s parent or guardian at the conference.
2. Notice to Parents/Guardians
At the time of the suspension, a School employee shall make a reasonable effort to contact the
parent/guardian by telephone or in person. Whenever a student is suspended, the parent/guardian
shall be notified in writing of the suspension. This notice shall state the specific offense committed
by the student. In addition, the notice may also state the date and time when the student may return to
school. If school officials wish to ask the parent/guardian to confer regarding matters pertinent to the
suspension, the notice may request that the parent/guardian respond to such requests without delay.
3. Suspension Time Limits/Recommendation for Expulsion
Suspensions, when not including a recommendation for expulsion, shall not exceed five (5)
consecutive school days per suspension.
Upon a recommendation of expulsion by the Principal, the pupil and the pupil’s guardian or
representative will be invited to a conference to determine if the suspension for the pupil should be
extended pending an expulsion hearing. This determination will be made by the Principal upon either
of the following determinations:
   the pupil’s presence will be disruptive to the education process; or
   the pupil poses a threat or danger to others. Upon either determination, the pupil’s suspension
will be extended pending the results of an expulsion hearing.

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F. Authority to Expel
A student may be expelled either by the Board following a hearing before it or by the Board upon the
recommendation of an Administrative Panel to be assigned by the Board as needed. The Panel should
consist of at least three members. The Administrative Panel may recommend expulsion of any student
found to have committed an expellable offense.

G. Expulsion Procedures
Students recommended for expulsion are entitled to a hearing to determine whether the student should be
expelled. Unless postponed for good cause, the hearing shall be held within thirty (30) school days after
the Principal or designee determines that the Pupil has committed an expellable offense.
The expulsion hearing will be presided over by the Board President or the chair of the Administrative
Panel. In the event a Panel hears the case, it will make a recommendation to the Board for a final
decision whether to expel. The hearing shall be held in closed session unless the pupil makes a written
request for a public hearing at least three (3) days prior to the hearing.
Written notice of the hearing shall be forwarded to the student and the student’s parent/guardian at least
ten (10) calendar days before the date of the hearing. Upon mailing the notice, it shall be deemed served
upon the pupil. The notice shall include:
1. The date and place of the expulsion hearing;
2. A statement of the specific facts, charges and offenses upon which the proposed expulsion is based;
3. A copy of the School’s disciplinary rules that relate to the alleged violation;
4. Notification of the student’s or parent/guardian’s obligation to provide information about the
student’s status at the school to any other school district or school to which the student seeks
enrollment;
5. The opportunity for the student or the student’s parent/guardian to appear in person or to employ and
be represented by counsel or an advocate;
6. The right to inspect and obtain copies of all documents to be used at the hearing;
7. The opportunity to confront and question all witnesses who testify at the hearing;
8. The opportunity to question all evidence presented and to present oral and documentary evidence on
the student’s behalf including witnesses.

H. Record of Hearing
A record of the hearing shall be made and may be maintained by any means, including electronic
recording, as long as a reasonably accurate and complete written transcription of the proceedings can be
made.

I.   Presentation of Evidence
While technical rules of evidence do not apply to expulsion hearings, evidence may be admitted and used
as proof only if it is the kind of evidence on which reasonable persons can rely in the conduct of serious
affairs. A recommendation by the Administrative Panel to expel must be supported by substantial
evidence that the student committed an expellable offense.
Findings of fact shall be based solely on the evidence at the hearing. While hearsay evidence is
admissible, no decision to expel shall be based solely on hearsay, and sworn declarations may be admitted
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as testimony from witnesses of whom the Board, Panel or designee determines that disclosure of their
identity or testimony at the hearing may subject them to an unreasonable risk of physical or psychological
harm.
If, due to a written request by the expelled pupil, the hearing is held at a public meeting, and the charge is
committing or attempting to commit a sexual assault or committing a sexual battery as defined in
Education Code Section 48900, a complaining witness shall have the right to have his or her testimony
heard in a session closed to the public.
The decision of the Administrative Panel shall be in the form of a written recommendation to the Board
who will make a final determination regarding the expulsion. The final decision by the Board shall be
made within ten (10) school days following the conclusion of the hearing.

J.   Written Notice to Expel
The Principal or designee following a decision of the Board to expel shall send written notice of the
decision to expel, including the Board’s findings of fact, to the student or parent/guardian. This notice
shall include the following:
1. Notice of the specific offense committed by the student.
2. Notice of any right to appeal the expulsion to the County Board of Education. If this Board will not
hear such appeals, the Charter School may establish a new panel of retired or current school
administrators or teachers who are not related to the Charter School to hear expulsion appeals but
who will follow the expulsion appeal procedures outlined in Education Code Sections 48921-48924.
3. Notice of the student’s or parent/guardian’s obligation to inform any new district in which the student
seeks to enroll of the student’s status with the School.
The Principal or designee shall send written notice of the decision to expel to the Student’s District of
residence and the State Board of Education or designee.
This notice shall include the following:
a. The student’s name
b. The specific expellable offense committed by the student.

K. Disciplinary Records
The School shall maintain records of all student suspensions and expulsions at the School. Such records
shall be made available for the Chartering Agency’s review upon request.

L. Expelled Pupils/Alternative Education
Pupils who are expelled shall be responsible for seeking alternative education programs including but not
limited to programs within the County or their school district of residence.

M. Rehabilitation Plans
Students who are expelled from the School shall be given a rehabilitation plan upon expulsion as
developed by the Board at the time of the expulsion order, which may include, but is not limited to,
periodic review as well as assessment at the time of review for readmission. The rehabilitation plan
should include a date not later than one year from the date of expulsion when the pupil may reapply to the
School for readmission.
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N. Readmission
The decision to readmit a pupil or to admit a previously expelled pupil from another school district or
charter school shall be in the sole discretion of the Board following a meeting with the Principal and the
pupil and guardian or representative, to determine whether the pupil has successfully completed the
rehabilitation plan and to determine whether the pupil poses a threat to others or will be disruptive to the
school environment. The Principal shall make a recommendation to the Board following the meeting
regarding his or her determination. The pupil’s readmission is also contingent upon the School’s capacity
at the time the student seeks readmission or admission.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
APPENDIX J – STUDENT REMEDIATION PLAN
Tassajara Preparatory High School (―TPHS‖) will screen the following data to identify low-achieving and
at-risk students in accordance with the California state guidelines:

   Students scoring at basic level or below on the previous year’s adopted standardized test in any one
subtest score in Math and/or Language Arts.
   Students who do not pass the CHSEE on the first attempt.
   Students who earn one or more C- or below per grading period.
   Students who are at least one year below grade level in the areas of reading, written language and
math, identified by informal teacher assessment or prior progress reports.
   Students recommended for academic intervention.

For more information on the identification of low-achieving and at-risk students, see the TPHS Charter
Petition Section II.F – Academically Low-Achieving Students and Appendix N – Data and
Assessment.

At-Risk Pupil Outcomes

 TPHS will make every effort to raise the standardized test scores of our at-risk students each year. At
risk students will have their standardized test scores individually monitored.
 All identified at-risk students will be referred for intervention services and receive individualized
attention in the classroom on a regular basis.

Strategies to Improve At-Risk Performance

 By the end of the eighth week of school, all parents of students at TPHS identified as low-achieving
will have been informed of their child’s academic standing.
 At Back to School Night and parent education workshops, parents will be given specific suggestions
as to how to help their child at home.
 Staff development sessions may be devoted to meeting both the needs of low-achieving students and
gifted students; innovative practices of teachers will be presented, implemented as appropriate, and
evaluated for their effectiveness.
 In the classroom, paraprofessionals and/or volunteers will provide individualized assistance directed
by the teacher.
 Student Academic Support will be available during after school faculty office hours, volunteer and
peer tutoring sessions.
 Preparation and follow-up activities such as field trips, guest speakers and assemblies will focus on
language development and conceptual understanding of material presented and/or experiences shared.
 A centralized list of targeted low-achieving students will be kept by the administrator to monitor
student progress, to track services, and to provide the TPHS Board or its designee with periodic updates
on the progress of student achievement.
 Confidentiality will be maintained and data will be provided without names.

TPHS started with a commitment to hire teachers and staff who will strive for excellence, aspire to teach
superbly, and dream about making a difference in the academic lives of their students.

We are committed to a partnership among students, staff, parents, and the surrounding community to
challenge our students academically, athletically, and artistically. All of our students will start with a
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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                               August 1, 2011
college-prep curriculum as freshman. The University of California A-G entrance requirements will serve
as the curricular backbone of our instructional program.

Three of our initial school goals will center around proficiency on both parts of the California High
School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) and the annual improvement on the California Standards Tests (CST’s).
Our progress indicators for measuring student achievement will include, but not necessarily be limited to,
the following: School-wide Benchmark Exams, CAHSEE, CST’s, Semester Grade Reports, Quarterly and
Semester Ineligibility Lists, Quarterly Honor Roll Lists, Student Attendance, Student Work Including
Essays, Reports, Tests, Quizzes, Journals, Portfolios, Oral Presentations, Project Products, Discussions,
Investigations, Lab Assignments, and Experiments. Progress indicators will be checked monthly at core
academic data team meetings. Other progress indicators will be tracked every quarter and every semester
in each grading period. CAHSEE and CST’s will be monitored annually. In addition to our core
academic offerings, TPHS students will have four distinct areas of emphasis to choose from as part of
their academic curriculum: Environmental Studies, Arts & Humanities, Applied Technology, and
Entrepreneurship.

TPHS will maintain a culture of high expectations for all students. For those whose achievement
potentials are not being realized, administrators and teachers will work to ensure that no student falls
behind. The structure of the TPHS curriculum and the instructional strategies outlined here are designed
to maximize the learning opportunities for low-achieving and at-risk students. Low-achieving and at-risk
students will be thoroughly integrated into the entire student body, and they will participate fully in all
aspects of the TPHS curriculum.

At TPHS, low-achieving students are defined as those who fall at or below the 50th percentile on the
adopted standardized tests, fall below a C- average in coursework, and/or fall below the learning
behavior, language acquisition, and fine & gross motor skills in comparison with their peer group.
At TPHS, at-risk students are defined as those who achieve at or below the 40th percentile on adopted
standardized tests, fall below a D+ average in coursework, and may or may not qualify for special
education services. TPHS considers both groups as students who have not realized their full achievement
potentials.

Parents of low-achieving or at-risk students will be contacted and consulted in the development of
strategies aimed at meeting the specific needs of the students through the Student Success Team (SST)
process. An SST will use a systematic problem-solving approach to assist students with concerns that are
interfering with success. The SST will clarify problems and concerns, develop strategies, organize
resources, and provide a system for school accountability, as it serves the students, parents, and teachers.
After the implementation and follow-up of an SST plan, if the problem persists, revisions to the plan may
be discussed, and a referral for special education evaluation or Section 504 assessment may be considered
necessary by the SST.

EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE
 All courses at TPHS will be aligned with the California State Framework and the California Content
Standards.

   Each Course of Study at TPHS will be board approved, be accompanied by a pacing guide, and be
aligned with the content and performance standards defined by the State of California.

   Consistent data monitoring and analysis will be used to drive the curriculum and instruction.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
   All instructional materials for the core subjects will be standards-based.

   Each student will have a textbook for each core academic subject area. In fact, students will often be
given two copies of their assigned books; one copy will be kept at home, while the other copy will be
kept at the school.

   All instructional materials, including supplemental materials, will be reviewed by TPHS teachers and
department chairs using the most rigorous standards to ensure that the materials are appropriate to the
grade and subject level of the students.

   Supplemental materials include dictionaries, laboratory supplies, and novels. The “Meeting the
California Challenge” materials, published by the State of California, on passing the exit exam in both
English Language Arts and Mathematics are also considered to be supplemental.

SPECIFIC STRATEGIES FOR INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION
 TPHS will continually provide its teaching staff with professional development focused on
maximizing the achievement potentials of all the students. Trainings will include, but not be limited
to, proven techniques for identifying students who are in danger of falling into low-performing and
at-risk categories, effective remediation strategies once students become low-performing or at-risk,
and field-test methods for adjusting assignments, projects, and tests that will optimize student
success.

   Teachers of English Language Learner (ELL) students will use Specially Designed Academic
Instruction in English (SDAIE) techniques to meet the needs of ELL students.

   Before, During, and After School Scientific Research-Based Intervention

―Scientific Research-Based Intervention‖ means ―research that involves the application
of rigorous, systematic, and objective procedures to obtain reliable and valid knowledge
relevant to the educational activities and programs, and includes research that:

1. employs systematic, empirical methods based on observation or experiment;
2. involves rigorous data analyses that are adequate to test the stated hypotheses and
justify the general conclusions drawn;
3. produces valid and consistent data for multiple evaluators and observers, across
multiple quantitative measurements and qualitative observations, and across studies
by the same or different investigators;
4. is evaluated using experimental or quasi-experimental designs;
5. ensures that experimental studies are presented in sufficient detail and clarity to allow
for reapplication; and
6. has been accepted by a peer-reviewed journal or approved by a panel of independent
experts through a comparably rigorous, objective, and scientific review.

Mandatory Academic Study Hall: MASH will be built into the school day. Students will have access to
faculty members during this period and be held accountable for the daily work assigned by faculty
members.

   Peer Tutoring

   Teacher Tutoring

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                             August 1, 2011
    ELL students will be accommodated in classes while being provided ELD curriculum for EL 1, 2,
3, 4P and 4G.

    After-school supplemental classes will be offered in core academic content areas that include
English, Math, Science, and Social Studies.

    CAHSEE English and CAHSEE Math classes will be offered during the school day for students
in need of remediation.

    A remedial Algebra course will be offered for juniors who have not yet passed the CAHSEE.

    A remedial English course will be offered for juniors who have not yet passed the CAHSEE.

    Classroom intervention at TPHS will emphasize cooperative learning in flexible groups. By
working closely with students at all proficiency levels, low-achieving and at-risk students will
gain new knowledge and learn new strategies for solving problems. Working in flexible groups
will help all students realize that everyone has unique skills and abilities necessary to solve
problems. This awareness will raise the self-esteem of low-achieving and at-risk students and
increase their positive attitudes toward school, learning, and success.

    The instructional design model to be used by TPHS will place a heavy emphasis on
differentiating instruction—a key strategy for English Language Learner success. Other
strategies will include, but not be limited to, the following techniques:

Identifying Similarities and Differences;
Summarizing and Note Taking;
Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition;
Homework and Practice;
Nonlinguistic Representation;
Cooperative Learning;
Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback;
Generating and Testing Hypotheses;
Cues, Questions, and Advanced Organizers.

These nine instructional strategies are proven to be effective strategies for all
students, including ELL students. [1]

[1] Robert Marzano. Classroom Instruction That Works. New York: ASCD, 2001. Jana Echevarria & Anne Graves. Sheltered
Content Instruction: Teaching English-Language Learners with Diverse Abilities. New York: Allyn and Bacon, 2003.

CATEGORICAL FUND SERVICES FOR UNDER-PEFORMING STUDENTS
 Since TPHS is not a Title One School, we will use a portion of our professional development funding
to provide “training” for our teachers that makes them more “Highly Qualified” under No-Child-Left-
Behind (NCLB) measures and mandates.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                                      August 1, 2011
   TPHS will be very focused on the success of under-performing students. For students who do not
pass certain portions of the CAHSEE, TPHS will provide targeted remedial classes in specific subject
areas during regular school days.
   One of our staff members will be identified as our ELL Coordinator.

   One section of ELL students will be grouped together in one class to receive English Language Arts
instruction at their grade and proficiency level. (To be adjusted as needed).

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                         August 1, 2011
APPENDIX K – STUDENT SUCCESS TEAM
Purpose
A Student Success Team (SST) is a school–based, problem-solving group whose purpose is to provide
assistance to teachers in the area of instruction, curriculum, and classroom management. An SST will
organize the available resources at a given school into a system for identifying and solving problems of
teaching students who do not progress at a satisfactory rate in the general education program.

A support system is needed to assist teachers in improving instruction and, at the same time, ensuring that
appropriate special education referrals are made. Shifting the emphasis from referral to, assessment for,
and placement in special programs to planned individualized instruction within the context of the general
education class will be the first option for dealing with problem students.

Underpinning the rationale for employing a team approach in helping students with learning challenges is
the belief that, by pooling knowledge and collective brainstorming, members of the group can generate
more practical solutions and make better decisions for the student. In addition, inter-professional teams
have the potential for providing the following benefits to educators:
 Sharing responsibilities in planning and programming across disciplines;
 Providing an emotional and peer problem-solving support system within TPHS;
 Facilitating satisfying professional interactions amongst staff;
 Developing a forum to facilitate the convergence of differing values and points of view;
 Increasing awareness of and sensitivity to the needs of others;
 Providing an ongoing in-service vehicle;
 Leveraging staff strengths;
 Providing the opportunity for general educators and specialists to work together.

SST’s operate on the assumption that different students learn in different ways. These differences can be
identified and should be considered in designing a student’s learning experience. Different kinds of
instructional and behavioral interventions under the appropriate settings will produce scholastic and
behavioral gains.

SST’s use data derived from both formal and informal assessments, observations, and classroom
performance to develop a plan for working with the individual student. The intervention strategies are
documented, carefully monitored, and evaluated for their effectiveness in facilitating the desired
scholastic and social outcomes.

Specifically, the SST Role(s):
 Review individual cases to refer to the team;
 Explore and identify classroom accommodations, modifications, interventions, alternatives, and
actions available to the case;
 Plan the action to be taken to meet the needs of the student;
 Document the action(s) taken;
 Review the outcome of the accommodations, modifications, interventions, alternatives, or actions
taken;
 Where appropriate, recommend processing for referral to special education.

The SST is a general education function and should not be confused with an individualized education
program (IEP) team, which focuses on special education eligibility and placement options. By providing
problem-specific support, the SST will assure that appropriate referrals are made to special education.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                            August 1, 2011
Referrals for a special education assessment can come from teachers, specialists, parents, administrators,
community professionals, or the students themselves. When a parent or legal guardian makes a verbal or
written referral for a special education assessment, TPHS staff will recommend the school’s SST
procedures to the referring person. If the SST process is accepted by the parent or guardian, TPHS will
identify a staff member as a coordinator for that particular case. The coordinator must meet with the
referring person and the child’s classroom teacher to help identify and clarify the expressed areas of
concern. The coordinator should record these concerns on the Student Study Team Referral form and
forward it to TPHS’s SST chairperson or the chairperson’s designee. The SST chairperson should
complete the following steps:
 If the referral came from someone other than the student’s parent or legal guardian, TPHS staff will
notify the student’s parents and the appropriate TPHS administrators (use SST-04 and SST-05 forms).
 ach referral will go through an intake process at TPHS and be screened. A TPHS administrator will
meet with the referring person. Together they will go directly to the classroom teacher to clarify the
identified concerns, plan preliminary strategies to address concerns, and start the SST Classroom
Checklist (SST-03). The TPHS administrator will place the student’s name on the SST agenda and
record each SST referral on the SST Referral Log (SST-02).

The Screening Process at the SST level may consist of observation and information gathering, which may
result in suggestions of accommodation and modifications in the general school program. Such
accommodation and modification must first be considered as a safeguard of the student’s right to the least
restrictive environment, including only that degree of assessment which can be justified as necessary and
in the best interests of the student.

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The Tassajara Preparatory High School Student Success Team (TPHS SST) Process

Student Presents
A Problem

Parent and Site Administrator Contacted
Preliminary Strategies are Planned

PROBLEM RESOLVED:                        PROBLEM NOT RESOLVED:
Watch and Consult                           Place on SST Agenda.
Notify Members and Invite Parent

Student Study Team Meets

SST Develops Action Plan.
Sets Follow-Up Date.

Monitor

SST Follow-Up.

PLAN WORKING:                                      PLAN NOT
Watch and Consult.                                 WORKING.
SST
Develops
New
Strategies
SST Makes Referral
To Special Programs

Timeline Starts if
Special Ed Referral

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Quality of Indicators of Effective Student Success Teams

   A TPHS administrator will provide encouragement and leadership to the Student Success Team.

   The SST will be composed primarily of general education teachers at TPHS who believe in the SST
concept and are willing to devote extra time and energy to the SST process.

   Resource staff and special education staff will participate in the team’s meetings regularly.

   Parents will be actively encouraged to participate in discussion and decision-making.

   There will be an identifiable facilitator and recorder at each meeting.

   Team members will come prepared to share information and participate in meaningful discussions
about the student at the center of the SST process.

   Team meetings will be held at regular preplanned times, and team members will have adequate time
to prepare for the meeting.

   Meetings will be characterized by efficient use of time.

   The team will routinely use group memory and document information relevant to the student’s
progress.

   Interventions will occur in the classrooms, and students will be evaluated before a referral is made to
another program such as special education.

   There will be a lower referral rate to special education.

   There will be a systematic monitoring and evaluation of planned invention.

   Successful and unsuccessful interventions will be documented and shared with staff, parents, and
special education personnel.

   TPHS staff will understand the purpose of the SST and know how to initiate the process.

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APPENDIX L – STAFF RECRUITMENT, DEVELOPMENT, AND
ASSESSMENT
TEACHER RECRUITMENT AND HIRING
Tassajara Preparatory High School (TPHS) actively recruits educators interested in working in more
accountable, innovative, collaborative environments. The organization has an extensive network of
relationships through which to recruit outstanding teachers and administrators. TPHS also uses
traditional advertising media: classified advertisements, Internet postings, teacher recruitment fairs, and
job announcements through local credentialing programs. Word-of-mouth among teachers is also an
important channel.

TPHS has a multiple-stage hiring approach that includes:
1. a resume screen;
2. interview with a site hiring committee (comprised of principal, teachers, and parents);
3. writing sample;
4. demonstration lesson with students;
5. reference checks.

Although this is a lengthier process than that used by most education organizations, TPHS believes that
finding the right match for both organization and individual will decrease turnover that is disruptive for
student learning and school culture.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Once teachers are hired, we invest in those individuals to support their continued professional
development. TPHS’s multi-pronged support system includes:
 2 weeks of summer training for all teachers new to TPHS;
 1:1 sessions with instructional coaches;
 New Teacher Support Group;
 Opportunity to observe demonstration lessons by grade-level Lead Teachers and Model Teachers;
 Regular classroom observations and formal performance feedback from the principal.

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
The TPHS Principal conducts periodic performance evaluations to provide regular feedback to teachers to
inform their professional growth; to ensure that teachers are appropriately rewarded according to their
actual performance; and to build a culture of accountability.

Criteria
In addition to TPHS’s core values, it uses the 5 criteria developed by the National Board for Professional
Teaching Standards (www.nbpts.org) to evaluate its teachers:
 Commitment to students;
 Knowledge of subject matter;
 Skill in management of learning;
 Reflection;
 Collaboration.

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Schedule
The TPHS Principal and Master Teachers meet with educators several times during the school year to
discuss individual performance:

 Beginning of year (or end of previous year): during this non-evaluative discussion, the educator and
Principal discuss development goals for the year.
 Mid-year: during this mini-evaluation during the 10th-15th week of school, the Principal conducts a
formal observation and provides concrete, constructive suggestions to improve the educator’s
performance against the standards.
 End of year: The final, formal evaluation takes place during 25th-30th week of school. The Principal
conducts a formal observation and evaluates educator’s performance against the Standards and
individual development goals. The educator also conducts a self-evaluation for discussion purposes,
and may elect to solicit feedback from peers.

In addition, the Principal may set additional formal or informal evaluation times for educators who are
having difficulty meeting the Standards.

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APPENDIX M – TRI-VALLEY LEARNING CORPORATION BYLAWS

AMENDED AND RESTATED
BYLAWS
OF
TRI-VALLEY LEARNING CORPORATION
(A California Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation)

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ARTICLE I
NAME

Section 1. NAME. The corporation formerly known as Livermore Charter Learning
Corporation, shall as of January 7, 2010, be known as the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (the
―Corporation‖).

ARTICLE II
PRINCIPAL OFFICE OF THE CORPORATION

Section 1. PRINCIPAL OFFICE OF THE CORPORATION. The principal office for the
transaction of the activities and affairs of the Corporation is located at 543 Sonoma Avenue, in
Livermore, California 94550. The board of directors of the Corporation (the ―Board‖) may change the
location of the principal office. Any such change of location must be noted by the secretary on these
bylaws, as amended from time to time (the ―Bylaws‖) opposite this Section; alternatively, this Section
may be amended to state the new location.

Section 2. OTHER OFFICES OF THE CORPORATION. The Board may at any time establish
branch or subordinate offices at any place or places where the Corporation is qualified to conduct its
activities.

ARTICLE III
GENERAL AND SPECIFIC PURPOSES; LIMITATIONS

Section 1. GENERAL AND SPECIFIC PURPOSES. The Corporation had been formed under
the California Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law for public, charitable, scientific and educational
purposes. The purpose of this corporation is to manage, operate, guide, direct and promote charter
schools. Also in the context of these purposes, the Corporation shall not, except to an insubstantial
degree, engage in any other activities or exercise of power that do not further the purposes of the
Corporation.

The Corporation shall not carry on any other activities not permitted to be carried on by: (a) a
corporation exempt from federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or the
corresponding section of any future federal tax code; or (b) a corporation, contributions to which are
deductible under section 170(c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code, or the corresponding section of any
future federal tax code. No substantial part of the activities of the Corporation shall consist of the carrying
on of propaganda, or otherwise attempting to influence legislation, and the Corporation shall not
participate in, or intervene in (including the publishing or distribution of statements) any political
campaign on behalf of or in opposition to any candidate for public office.

ARTICLE IV
CONSTRUCTION AND DEFINITIONS

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Section 1. CONSTRUCTION AND DEFINITIONS. Unless the context indicates otherwise, the
general provisions, rules of construction, and definitions set forth in the California Nonprofit Corporation
Law shall govern the construction of the Bylaws. Without limiting the generality of the preceding
sentence, the masculine gender includes the feminine and neuter, the singular includes the plural, the
plural includes the singular, and the term ―person‖ includes both a legal entity and a natural person.

ARTICLE V
DEDICATION OF ASSETS

Section 1. DEDICATION OF ASSETS. The Corporation’s properties and assets are
irrevocably dedicated to public benefit purposes, as such purposes are set forth in the charter (the
―Charter‖) of the Charter School, as amended from time to time. No part of the net earnings, properties, or
assets of the Corporation, on dissolution or otherwise, shall inure to the benefit of any private person or
individual, or to any director or officer of the Corporation. On liquidation or dissolution, all properties
and assets remaining after payment, or provision for payment, of all debts and liabilities of the
Corporation shall be distributed to a nonprofit fund, foundation, or corporation that is organized and
operated exclusively for charitable purposes and that has established its exempt status under Internal
Revenue Code section 501(c)(3).

ARTICLE VI
MEMBERS

Section 1. MEMBERS PROHIBITED. The Corporation shall not have members.

Section 2. EFFECT OF PROHIBITION. Any action which would otherwise require
approval by a majority of all members or approval by the members shall require only approval of
the Board of Directors. All rights which would otherwise vest under the Nonprofit Public Benefit
Corporation Law in the members shall vest in the directors.

ARTICLE VII
BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Section 1. GENERAL POWERS. Subject to the provisions and limitations of the California
Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law and any other applicable laws, and subject to any limitations
set forth in the Articles of Incorporation of the Corporation (the ―Articles‖) or the Bylaws, the
Corporation’s activities and affairs shall be managed, and all corporate powers shall be exercised, by or
under the direction of the Board. The Board may delegate the management of the Corporation’s activities
to any person(s), management company or committees, however composed, provided that the activities
and affairs of the Corporation shall be managed and all corporate powers shall be exercised under the
ultimate direction of the Board.

Section 2. SPECIFIC POWERS. Without prejudice to the general powers set forth in Article
VII, Section 1 of the Bylaws, but subject to the same limitations set forth therein, the Board shall have the
power to do the following:
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(a)     appoint and remove, at the pleasure of the Board, all corporate officers, agents, and
employees, subject to the provisions of any employment agreement; prescribe powers and duties for them
as are consistent with the law, the Articles of Incorporation and these bylaws; and fix their compensation,
if any;

(b)       change the principal office, the principal business office, or any branch office in
California from one location to another; cause the Corporation to be qualified to conduct its activities in
any other state, territory, dependency, or country; conduct its activities in or outside California; and
designate a place in or outside California for holding any meeting described in these bylaws; and

borrow money and incur indebtedness on the Corporation’s behalf and cause to be
(c)
executed and delivered for the Corporation’s purposes, in the corporate name, promissory notes, bonds,
debentures, deeds of trust, mortgages, pledges, hypothecations, and other evidences of debt and securities.

Section 3. BOARD COMPOSITION.

(a) Except as otherwise set forth below, directors shall be elected by the Board. As long as
the Corporation has at least one School Site Board (Section 21(b) of this article), one seat shall be
reserved for the designee of each School Site Board. The designee of a School Site Board must be a
member of that board. Subject to the foregoing and to Section 5 of this article, any person may be
nominated to be elected as a director by the method of nomination authorized by the Board or by any
other method authorized by law. Directors shall be elected at each annual meeting of the Board of
Directors to fill vacancies on the Board, including those vacancies created by directors whose terms have
expired. Except for the directors who are appointed by the School Site Boards, the candidates receiving
the highest number of votes up to the number of directors to be elected are elected. Directors shall be
eligible for re-election without limitation on the number of terms they may serve.

(b) Notwithstanding the foregoing, the adoption of these Amended and Restated Bylaws
shall not result in any director being removed before his or her term expires. Promptly following such
adoption, the Board shall designate the Directors who shall be deemed to occupy the Board seats reserved
for the designees of the School Site Boards. When one of those seats becomes vacant, the applicable
School Site Board shall fill the vacancy with one of its members.

Section 4. AUTHORIZED NUMBER OF DIRECTORS.

(a) As long as the Corporation has at least one School Site Board, the authorized number of
Directors shall be at least equal to the number of Board seats reserved for the designee(s) of the School
Site Board or Boards, as the case may be, pursuant to Section 3 of this article, and, because the seats
reserved for the designees of the School Site Boards must constitute a majority of the authorized
Directors, the total number of authorized Directors may not exceed twice the number of seats reserved for
the designee(s) of the School Site Board or Boards minus one.

(b) Notwithstanding the foregoing, the adoption of these Amended and Restated Bylaws
shall not result in any director being removed before his or her term expires. The maximum number of
authorized directors may temporarily exceed the number determined in accordance with paragraph (a)
above to the extent that the number of directors in office when these Amended and Restated Bylaws are
adopted exceeds such maximum number. In addition, promptly following the adoption of these Amended
and Restated Bylaws, the Board shall designate two Directors, in addition to the directors designated by
the Board pursuant to Section 3(b) of this article, who shall be deemed to occupy additional seats
reserved for designees of School Site Boards (even though their seats shall not actually be reserved for the
designees of the School Site Boards) so that a majority of the Directors immediately after the adoption of
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these Amended and Restated Bylaws shall be deemed to be made up of directors designated by the School
Site Boards, as required by Section 4(a) of this article. These two designations will automatically
terminate when the seats actually reserved for the designees of the School Site Boards pursuant to Section
3(b) constitute a majority of the number of authorized directors determined in accordance with Section
4(a) above.

(c) During periods when the Corporation does not have at least one School Site Board, the
authorized number of directors shall be at least three but not more than 11.

(d) The exact number of directors shall be fixed within the limits described in paragraphs (a)-
(c) above, by a resolution adopted by a majority of the members of the Board then in office, provided that
a quorum is present.

(e) The authorized number of directors may be changed at any time, by a resolution adopted
by a majority of the members of the Board then in office, provided that a quorum is present.

Section 5. RESTRICTION ON INTERESTED PERSONS AS DIRECTORS. None of the
persons serving on the Board may be ―interested persons‖. An interested person is: (a) any person
compensated by the Corporation for services rendered to it within the previous 12 months, whether as a
full-time or part-time employee, independent contractor, or otherwise, excluding any reasonable
compensation paid to a director as director; and (b) any brother, sister, ancestor, descendant, spouse,
brother-in-law, sister-in-law, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, mother-in-law, or father-in-law of such person.
The Board may adopt other policies circumscribing potential conflicts of interest, however, any violation
of this Section shall not affect the validity or enforceability of transactions entered into by the
Corporation.

Section 6. DIRECTORS’ TERMS. Subject to Section 13 of this article, each director shall
hold office for three years and until his successor has been duly elected.

Section 7. USE OF CORPORATE FUNDS TO SUPPORT NOMINEE. If more people have
been nominated for director than can be elected, no funds of the Corporation may be expended to support
a nominee without the Board’s authorization by way of resolution.

Section 8. EVENTS CAUSING VACANCIES ON BOARD. A vacancy or vacancies on the
Board shall occur in the event of: (a) the death, removal or resignation of a director; (b) the declaration by
resolution of the Board of a vacancy in a seat on the Board resulting from a director having been
convicted of a felony, declared of unsound mind by a court order, or found by final order or judgment of
any court to have breached a duty under the California Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law,
Chapter 2, Article 3; (c) the increase in the authorized number of directors; (d) the failure of the Board, at
any annual meeting of the Board at which any director or directors are to be elected, to elect the number
of directors required to be elected at such meeting; or (e) termination of the employment of a director who
is employed by the Corporation.

Section 9. RESIGNATION OF DIRECTORS. Except as provided below, any director may
resign at any time by giving written notice to the Executive Director or the Secretary of the Board. The
resignation shall be effective when the notice is given unless the notice specifies a later date for the
resignation to become effective. If a director’s resignation is effective at a later date, the Board may elect
a successor to take office as of the date when the resignation becomes effective.

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Section 10. DIRECTOR MAY NOT RESIGN IF NO DIRECTOR REMAINS. Except on
notice to the California Attorney General, no director may resign if the Corporation would be left with no
duly elected director or directors.

Section 11. REMOVAL OF DIRECTORS WITH CAUSE. The Board may remove a director
for cause, by an affirmative vote of the majority of the Board, when a director has been:

(a)      declared of unsound mind by a final order of court;

(b)      convicted of a felony;

(c)      found by a final order or judgment of any court to have breached any duty under Article 3
of the California Corporations Code; or

(d)      found to engage in conduct detrimental to the best interests of the Corporation.

In the case of a proposed removal of a director with cause under subsection (d) above, the
following procedures shall apply:

(1)       Board Resolution. The Board of Directors shall pass a resolution stating: (i) the
proposed removal action; (ii) the reasons therefor; (iii) the proposed date for the removal to take effect;
and (iv) the date, time, and place for a hearing before the Board by the director subject to the proposed
removal action. The date for the hearing shall be not less than five (5) days before the proposed effective
date.

(2)       Notice. The President or the Secretary shall send written notice of the hearing to
the director by first class mail to the last address of the director shown on this corporation’s records or by
any other means reasonably calculated to provide actual notice, containing the matters stated in the Board
resolution. Such notice shall be sent not less than ten (10) days before the hearing date.

(3)      Interim Action. The Board may take interim disciplinary actions pending the
hearing, if necessary to protect the vital interests of this corporation or to prevent any imminent harm to
this corporation.

(4)     Hearing Participation. The director subject to the proposed removal action may
choose to appear at the hearing (in person, by telephone conference call, and/or through a representative),
or make a written, videotaped, or audiotaped statement to the Board, at the director’s own cost. The Board
may place reasonable restrictions on the length of the director’s presentation. Any statement in writing or
other physical form must be received by the President or the Secretary not less than forty-eight (48) hours
before the hearing date.

(5)       Board Decision. After the hearing is ended and the director has been excused, the
Board shall discuss and vote on the proposed removal action. The deliberations shall be limited to
considering only the evidence presented during the hearing and the charges stated in the Board resolution.
To take disciplinary action, the Board must be persuaded that, more probably than not, one or more of the
allegations charged in the resolution are true. The decision of the Board of Directors shall be final.

(6)      Board Discretion. The Board has complete and sole discretion to decide questions
that may arise regarding this disciplinary procedure, to the extent they are not addressed by this policy or
the policy requires further interpretation, in order to ensure that the procedure is conducted in good faith
and in a fair and reasonable manner, considering the best interests of this corporation and the individual(s)
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affected. The Board is authorized to adopt and modify from time to time specific policies and procedures
for disciplinary proceedings, and the rights of the director subject to a proposed removal action are
limited to those stated in such policies and procedures and in this Section, and no other rights should be
presumed or inferred. The director charged does not have any absolute right to legal counsel, to identify
or confront witnesses against the director, or to more information about the charges or the evidence
beyond that provided in the notice of hearing. All types of evidence, including statements from persons
who are not present at the hearing, may be considered. All proceedings shall be conducted and materials
shall be presented to the Board in English. A decision by the Board to permit or not permit certain forms
of participation in one disciplinary situation shall not bind the Board to the same approach in another
situation.

Section 12. VACANCIES FILLED BY BOARD. Vacancies on the Board may be filled by
approval of the Board or, if the number of directors then in office is less than a quorum, by: (a) the
affirmative vote of a majority of the directors then in office at a meeting held according to notice or
waivers of notice complying with Corporations Code section 5211 as said chapter may be modified by
subsequent legislation or (c) a sole remaining director.

Section 13. DIRECTORS. Any reduction of the authorized number of directors shall not result
in any director being removed before his or her term of office expires.

Section 14. PLACE OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETINGS. Meetings shall be held at the
principal office of the Corporation. The Board may designate that a meeting be held at any place within
California that has been designated by resolution of the Board or in the notice of the meeting. All
meetings of the Board shall be called, held and conducted in accordance with the terms and provisions of
the Ralph M. Brown Act (California Government Code Sections 54950 et seq.) (―Brown Act‖) as said
chapter may be modified by subsequent legislation.

Section 15. TELECONFERENCE MEETINGS. Members of the Board of Directors may
participate in teleconference meetings so long as all of the following requirements in the Brown Act are
complied with:

(a)    At a minimum, a quorum of the members of the Board of Directors shall participate in
the teleconference meeting from locations within the boundaries of the school district in which the
Charter School operates;

(b)      All votes taken during a teleconference meeting shall be by roll call;

(c)     If the Board of Directors elects to use teleconferencing, it shall post agendas at all
teleconference locations with each teleconference location being identified in the notice and agenda of the
meeting;

(d)     All locations where a member of the Board of Directors participates in a meeting via
teleconference must be fully accessible to members of the public and shall be listed on the agenda;

(e)      Members of the public must be able to hear what is said during the meeting and shall be
provided with an opportunity to address the Board of Directors directly at each teleconference location;
and

(f)     The agenda shall indicate that members of the public attending a meeting conducted via
teleconference need not give their name when entering the conference call.

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Section 16. ANNUAL AND REGULAR MEETINGS. Regular meetings of the Board shall be
held at least monthly during the calendar year, provided that notice of each regular and special meeting is
provided in accordance with Article VII, Section 18. At least 72 hours before a regular meeting, the
Board of Directors, or its designee shall post an agenda containing a brief general description of each item
of business to be transacted or discussed at the meeting. In addition, the Board shall hold a meeting
annually during the fall term of the academic year at a time designated by the Board for the purpose of
electing directors and appointing officers of the Board. The Board may hold regular, special and
emergency meetings. All meetings of the Board shall be called, held and conducted in accordance with
the terms and provisions of the Brown Act.

Section 17. AUTHORITY TO CALL SPECIAL MEETINGS. Special meetings of the Board
may be called for any purpose at any time by the President or a majority of the directors then in office.

Section 18. NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETINGS. Notice of the time and place of special
meetings shall be given to each director by: (a) personal delivery of written notice; (b) first-class mail,
postage prepaid; (c) telephone, including a voice messaging system or other system or technology
designed to record and communicate messages, either directly to the director or to a person at the
director’s office who would reasonably be expected to communicate that notice promptly to the director;
(d) telegram; (e) facsimile; (f) electronic mail; or (g) other electronic means. All such notices shall be
given or sent to the director’s address or telephone number as shown on the Corporation’s records and
shall be sent with at least such notice as is required in accordance with the terms and provisions of the
Brown Act.

Notice of the time and place of special meetings shall be given to all media who have provided
written notice to the Corporation.

The notice shall state the time of the meeting and the place, if the place is other than the
Corporation’s principal office and the business to be transacted at the meeting.

All notice requirements will comply with the terms and provisions of the Brown Act.

Section 19. QUORUM. A majority of the number of Directors then in office shall constitute a
quorum for the transaction of any business except adjournment; provided; however, that a quorum shall
be at least one-fifth of the authorized Directors, or two, whichever is larger, unless the authorized number
of Directors is one, in which case one Director constitutes a quorum. Every action taken or decision made
by a majority of the Directors present at a duly held meeting at which a quorum is present shall be an act
of the Board, subject to the more stringent provisions of the California Nonprofit Public Benefit
Corporation Law, including, without limitation, those provisions relating to:

(a)      approval of contracts or transactions in which a director has a direct or indirect material
financial interest;

(b)      approval of certain transactions between corporations having common directorships;

(c)      creation of and appointments to committees of the Board; and

(d)      indemnification of directors and officers.

A meeting at which a quorum is initially present may continue to transact business, despite the
withdrawal of some directors, if any action taken or decision made is approved by at least a majority of
the required quorum for that meeting.
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Section 20. COMPENSATION AND REIMBURSEMENT. Directors and officers will receive
no compensation for their services as directors or officers. Directors and officers may receive such
reimbursement of expenses, as the Board may establish by resolution to be just and reasonable as to the
Corporation at the time that the resolution is adopted.

Section 21. COMMITTEES.

(a) Board Committees.          The Board, by resolution adopted by a majority of the directors
then in office, provided a quorum is present, may create one or more committees, consisting of two or
more directors, to serve at the pleasure of the Board. Board committees shall act in an advisory capacity
with respect to the Board and shall report to the Board at its regular meetings, as required by the Board.
Appointments to committees of the Board shall be by majority vote of the number of directors then in
office. The Board may appoint one or more directors as alternate members of any such committee, who
may replace any absent member at any meeting. Any such Board committee shall have all the authority of
the Board, to the extent provided in the Board resolution, except that no Board committee may:

(1)     take any final action on any matter that under the California Nonprofit Public

(2)     fill vacancies on the Board or any committee of the Board;

(3)     fix compensation of employees, or of the directors for serving on the Board or on
any committee;

(4)     amend or repeal Bylaws or adopt new bylaws;

(5)     amend or repeal any resolution of the Board that by its express terms is not so
amendable or repealable;

(6)     create any other committees of the Board or appoint the members of committees
of the Board;

(7)      expend corporate funds to support a nominee for director if more people have
been nominated for director than can be elected; or

(8)    approve any contract or transaction to which the Corporation is a party and in
which one or more of its directors has a material financial interest, except as special approval is provided
for in Corporations Code section 5233(d)(3).

(b)      School Site Boards.      The Board, by resolution adopted by a majority of the directors
then in office, provided that a quorum is present, will create a School Site Board for each school operated
by the Corporation and for each school that the Corporation has an approved charter petition for. School
Site Boards shall act in an advisory capacity with respect to the Board and shall report to the Board at its
regular meetings, as required by the Board. Each School Site Board shall have seven authorized
members. Appointments to the School Site Board for a particular school shall be made by the parents and
guardians of students enrolled at the school. School Site Board members shall be elected in September
each year for a three year term. A parent or guardian’s entitlement to vote for the members of a School
Site Board shall be contingent upon having a child enrolled in the Charter School the School Site Board
represents in the applicable academic year. Parents and guardians entitled to vote at each annual election
shall be determined based on the books of the Corporation as of September 1 of each academic year.
There shall be one vote per student enrolled in the Charter School in the applicable academic year,
allotted to the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of each enrolled student. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the
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Board of Directors shall appoint (i) three of the initial members of the School Site Board of any school
being operated by the Corporation when these Amended and Restated Bylaws are adopted and (ii) all of
the members of the School Site Board of any school that is in the process of being established and does
not have at least seven enrolled students. The meetings and actions of those entitled to elect members of
School Site Boards shall be governed by, and held and taken under the provisions of, these Bylaws
concerning Board meetings and actions and the Brown Act. Members of School Site Boards need not be
directors of the Corporation. The School Site Board will select one or more representatives to the Board
of the Corporation (in accordance with Section 3 of this article). Subject to the ultimate authority of the
Board of the Corporation to manage the activities and affairs of the Corporation and to direct the exercise
of corporate powers as set forth in Section 1 of this article, each such School Site Board will have
authority to manage the activities of the Corporation at its school site in the following areas:

(1)     oversight of approved financial budget;

(2)     health and safety;

(3)     admissions, enrollment and attendance;

(4)     outreach;

(5)     staff planning and utilization;

(6)     curriculum and instruction;

(7)     professional/staff development;

(8)     school site policies and procedures including Student/Family Handbook;

(9)     student testing;

(10)    local/site recognitions and awards

(11)    grievances (except those pertaining to Special Education);

(12)    expulsions;

(13)    extra-curricular activities such as sports and clubs; and

This authority is subject to guidelines, policies and procedures as established, from time to time, by the
Board of the Corporation.

School Site Boards will comply with the Brown Act.

(c)     Advisory Committees. The Board may, by resolution adopted by a majority of the
directors then in office, provided that a quorum is present, create one of more advisory committees to
serve at the pleasure of the Board. The advisory committees shall act in an advisory capacity with respect
to the Board and shall report to the Board at its regular meetings, as required by the Board. Members of
advisory committees need not be directors of the Corporation, and advisory committees shall have no
authority to act on behalf of the Board or the Corporation.

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Section 22. MEETINGS AND ACTION OF COMMITTEES. Meetings and actions of
committees of the Board shall be governed by, held, and taken under the provisions of these bylaws
concerning meetings, other Board actions, and the Brown Act, if applicable, except that the time for
general meetings of such committees and the calling of special meetings of such committees may be set
either by Board resolution or, if none, by resolution of the committee. Minutes of each meeting shall be
kept and shall be filed with the corporate records. The Board may adopt rules for the governance of any
committee as long as the rules are consistent with the Bylaws. If the Board has not adopted rules, the
committee may do so.

Section 23. NON-LIABILITY OF DIRECTORS. No director or officer shall be personally
liable for the debts, liabilities, or other obligations of the Corporation.

Section 24. COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS GOVERNING STUDENT RECORDS. The Charter
School and the Board shall comply with all applicable provisions of the Family Education Rights Privacy
Act (―FERPA‖) as set forth in Title 20 of the United States Code Section 1232g and attendant regulations,
as amended from time to time.

Section 25. AUDIT COMMITTEE. The corporation shall have an Audit Committee. The Audit
Committee may consist of one or more persons and include persons who are not members of the Board. The
member or members of the Audit Committee shall not include any members of the corporation’s staff,
including the President or Chief Executive Officer and the Treasurer or Chief Financial Officer (whether or
not such officers are uncompensated Board officers or paid staff members.) If the corporation has a Finance
Committee, it must be separate from the Audit Committee. The chairperson of the Audit Committee may not
be a member of the Finance Committee, and members of the Finance Committee shall not constitute more
than 50 percent of the Audit Committee. Members of the Audit Committee shall not receive any
compensation from the corporation in excess of the compensation, if any, received by members of the Board
of Directors for service on the Board and shall not have a material financial interest in any entity doing
business with the corporation.

Subject to the supervision of the Board of Directors, the Audit Committee shall be responsible for:

(a)      making recommendations to the Board of Directors on the hiring and firing of the
independent auditor;

(b)      conferring with the auditor to satisfy the committee members that the financial affairs of the
organization are in order;

(c)      reviewing and determining whether to accept the audit;

(d)      approving the performance of any non-audit services to be provided by the auditing firm;
and

(e)       negotiating the compensation of the auditor on behalf of the Board, provided the Board
delegates this task to the Audit Committee.

ARTICLE VIII
OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION

Section 1. OFFICERS. The officers of the Corporation shall be a Chairman of the Board who
shall be known as the President of the Board (or ―President‖), a Vice-Chairman who shall be know as the

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Vice-President., a Chief Financial Officer, who shall be known as the Treasurer, a Secretary, a Chief
Operating Officer and an Chief Academic Officer.

Section 2. DUPLICATION OF OFFICE HOLDERS. Any number of offices may be held by
the same person, except that neither the Secretary nor the Treasurer may serve concurrently as the
President.

Section 3. ELECTION OF OFFICERS. The officers of the Corporation shall be appointed by
the majority of the members of the Board then in office at the annual meeting of the Board, and shall
serve at the pleasure of the Board, subject to the rights of any officer under any employment contract, if
applicable.

Section 4. APPOINTMENT OF OTHER OFFICERS. The Board may appoint, by resolution of
a majority of the members of the Board then in office, such additional officers of the Board that may be
required, in the Board’s discretion. Each appointed officer shall have the title and authority, hold office
for the period, and perform the duties specified in the bylaws or established by the board.

Section 5. REMOVAL OF OFFICERS. Without prejudice to the rights of any officer under an
employment contract, if applicable, the Board may remove any officer with or without cause.

Section 6. RESIGNATION OF OFFICERS. Any officer may resign at any time by giving
written notice to the Board. The resignation shall take effect on the date the notice is received or at any
later date specified in the notice. Unless otherwise specified in the notice, the resignation need not be
accepted to be effective. Any resignation shall be without prejudice to any rights of the Corporation under
any contract to which the officer is a party.

Section 7. VACANCIES IN OFFICE. A vacancy in any office because of death, resignation,
removal, disqualification, or any other cause shall be filled in the manner prescribed in these bylaws for
normal appointment to that office provided, however, that vacancies need not be filled on an annual basis.

Section 8. PRESIDENT. The President shall preside at the Board of Directors’ meetings and
shall exercise and perform such other powers and duties as the Board of Directors may assign from time
to time in writing. In the absence of the President, the Vice-President shall preside at Board of Directors
meetings and shall exercise and perform such other powers and duties as the Board of Directors may
assign from time to time in writing.

Section 9. VICE PRESIDENT. If the President is absent or disabled, the Vice-President shall
perform all duties of the President. When so acting, a Vice-President shall have all powers of and be
subject to all restrictions on the President. The Vice-President shall have such other powers and perform
such other duties as the Board may assign from time to time.

Section 10. SECRETARY. The Secretary shall keep or cause to be kept, at the principal office
of the Corporation, a copy of the Articles and Bylaws, as amended to date.

The Secretary shall give, or cause to be given, notice of all meetings of members, of the Board,
and of committees of the Board that these bylaws require to be given. The Secretary shall have such other
powers and perform such other duties as the Board may assign from time to time.

Section 11. TREASURER. The Treasurer shall oversee the keeping and maintenance of
adequate and correct books and accounts of the Corporation’s properties and transactions. The Treasurer
shall send or cause to be given to the directors such financial statements and reports as are required to be
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given by law, by these bylaws or by the Board. The books of account shall be open to inspection by any
director at all reasonable times.

Section 12. CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER (COO). AND CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER
(CAO). The COO and CAO shall supervise, direct and control the Corporation’s day to day activities and
affairs consistent with these bylaws and as outlined in the COO and CAO job specification and/or
employment contract, if any, subject to the overall direction and supervision of the Board of Directors.
The COO has the responsibility of compiling the Board of Director’s agenda in consultation with the
President, who has veto power over the COO. These bylaws are not intended and in no way modify the
terms and conditions of any employment relationship.

ARTICLE IX
CONTRACTS WITH DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS

Section 1. CONTRACTS WITH DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS. No director of the Corporation
nor any other corporation, firm, association, or other entity in which one or more of the Corporation’s
directors are directors have a material financial interest, shall be interested, directly or indirectly, in any
contract or transaction with this Corporation, unless:

the material facts regarding that director’s financial interest in such contract or
(a)
transaction or regarding such common directorship, officership, or financial interest are fully disclosed in
good faith and noted in the minutes, or are known to all members of the Board prior to the Board’s
consideration of such contract or transaction;

(b)      such contract or transaction is authorized in good faith by a majority of the Board by a
vote sufficient for that purpose without counting the votes of the interested directors;

(c)      before authorizing or approving the transaction, the Board considers and in good faith
decides after reasonable investigation that the Corporation could not obtain a more advantageous
arrangement with reasonable effort under the circumstances; and

(d)      the Corporation for its own benefit enters into the transaction, which is fair and
reasonable to the Corporation at the time the transaction is entered into.

This Section does not apply to a transaction that is part of an educational or charitable program of
the Corporation if it

(a)    is approved or authorized by the Corporation in good faith and without unjustified
favoritism; and

(b)     results in a benefit to one or more directors or their families because they are in the class
of persons intended to be benefited by the educational or charitable program of the Corporation.

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ARTICLE X
LOANS TO DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS

Section 1. LOANS TO DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS. The Corporation shall not lend any
money or property to or guarantee the obligation of any director or officer without the approval of the
Attorney General of the State of California; provided, however, that the Corporation may advance money
to a director or officer of the Corporation for expenses reasonably anticipated to be incurred in the
performance of his or her duties if that director or officer would be entitled to reimbursement for such
expenses by the Corporation.

ARTICLE XI
INDEMNIFICATION

Section 1. DEFINITIONS. For the purposes of this Article, ―agent‖ means any person who is or
was a Director, Officer, employee, or other agent of the corporation, or is or was serving at the request of the
corporation as a Director, Officer, employee, or agent of another foreign or domestic corporation, partnership,
joint venture, trust, or other enterprise, or was a Director, Officer, employee, or agent of a foreign or domestic
corporation which was a predecessor corporation of the corporation or of another enterprise at the request of
such predecessor corporation; ―proceeding‖ means any threatened, pending, or completed action or
proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative, or investigative; and ―expenses‖ includes without
limitation attorneys’ fees and any expenses of establishing a right to indemnification under this Article.

Section 2 INDEMNIFICATION IN ACTIONS BY THIRD PARTIES. The corporation shall have
power to indemnify any person who was or is a party or is threatened to be made a party to any proceeding
(other than an action by or in the right of the corporation to procure a judgment in its favor, an action brought
under section 5233 of the California Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law, or an action brought by the
Attorney General or a person granted relator status by the Attorney General for any breach of duty relating to
assets held in charitable trust), by reason of the fact that such person is or was an agent of the corporation,
against expenses, judgments, fines, settlements, and other amounts actually and reasonably incurred in
connection with such proceeding if such person acted in good faith and in a manner such person reasonably
believed to be in the best interests of the corporation and, in the case of a criminal proceeding, had no
reasonable cause to believe the conduct of such person was unlawful. The termination of any proceeding by
judgment, order, settlement, conviction, or upon a plea of nolo contendere or its equivalent shall not, of itself,
create a presumption that the person did not act in good faith and in a manner which the person reasonably
believed to be in the best interests of the corporation or that the person had reasonable cause to believe that
the person’s conduct was unlawful.

Section 3. INDEMNIFICATION IN ACTIONS BY OR IN THE RIGHT OF THE
CORPORATION. The corporation shall have power to indemnify any person who was or is a party or is
threatened to be made a party to any threatened, pending, or completed action by or in the right of the
corporation, or brought under section 5233 of the California Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law, or
brought by the Attorney General or a person granted relator status by the Attorney General for breach of duty
relating to assets held in charitable trust, to procure a judgment in its favor by reason of the fact that such
person is or was an agent of the corporation, against expenses actually and reasonably incurred by such
person in connection with the defense or settlement of such action if such person acted in good faith, in a
manner such person believed to be in the best interest of the corporation, and with such care, including

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reasonable inquiry, as an ordinarily prudent person in a like position would use under similar circumstances.
No indemnification shall be made under this Section:

(a)      In respect of any claim, issue, or matter as to which such person shall have been adjudged to
be liable to the corporation in the performance of such person’s duty to the corporation, unless and only to the
extent that the court in which such proceeding is or was pending shall determine upon application that, in
view of all the circumstances of the case, such person is fairly and reasonably entitled to indemnity for the
expenses which such court shall determine;

(b)     In respect of amounts paid in settling or otherwise disposing of a threatened or pending
action, with or without court approval; or

(c)      In respect of expenses incurred in defending a threatened or pending action which is settled
or otherwise disposed of without court approval, unless it is settled with the approval of the Attorney General.

Section 4. INDEMNIFICATION AGAINST EXPENSES. To the extent that an agent of the
corporation has been successful on the merits in defense of any proceeding referred to in Sections 2 or 3 of
this Article, or in defense of any claim, issue, or matter therein, the agent shall be indemnified against
expenses actually and reasonably incurred by the agent in connection therewith.

Section 5. LIMITATIONS ON INDEMNIFICATION. Except as provided in Section 4 of this
Article, any indemnification under this Article shall be made by the corporation only if authorized in the
specific case, upon a determination that indemnification of the agent is proper in the circumstances
because the agent has met the applicable standard of conduct set forth in Sections 2 and 3 of this Article,
by:
(a)     A majority vote of a quorum consisting of Directors who are not parties to such
proceeding;
(b)     Approval of the members, if any, in accordance with section 5034 of the California
Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law, with the persons to be indemnified not being entitled to vote
thereon; or
(c)     The court in which such proceeding is or was pending upon application made by the
corporation or the agent or the attorney or other person rendering services in connection with the defense,
whether or not such application by the agent, attorney or other person is opposed by the corporation.

Section 6. ADVANCING OF EXPENSES. Expenses incurred in defending any proceeding may
be advanced by the corporation prior to the final disposition of such proceeding upon receipt of an
undertaking by or on behalf of the agent to repay such amount unless it shall be determined ultimately
that the agent is entitled to be indemnified as authorized in this Article. The provisions of subdivision (a)
of section 5236 of the California Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law do not apply to advances
made pursuant to this subdivision.

Section 7. CONSISTENCY WITH CALIFORNIA LAW. No provision made by the
corporation to indemnify its or its subsidiary’s Directors or Officers for the defense of any proceeding,
whether contained in the articles, bylaws, a resolution of members, if any, or Directors, an agreement or
otherwise, shall be valid unless consistent with section 5238 of the California Nonprofit Public Benefit
Corporation Law. Nothing contained in this Article or in section 5238 of the California Nonprofit Public
Benefit Corporation Law, shall affect any right to indemnification to which persons other than such
Directors and Officers may be entitled by contract or otherwise.

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Section 8. PROHIBITION OF INDEMNIFICATION. No indemnification or advance shall be
made under this Article, except as provided in Section 4 or Section 5(c) of this Article, in any
circumstance where it appears:
(a)     That it would be inconsistent with a provision of the articles, bylaws, a resolution of the
members, if any, or an agreement in effect at the time of the accrual of the alleged cause of action asserted
in the proceeding in which the expenses were incurred or other amounts were paid, which prohibits or
otherwise limits indemnification; or
(b)     That it would be inconsistent with any condition expressly imposed by a court in
approving a settlement.

Section 9. LIABILITY INSURANCE. The corporation shall have power to purchase and
maintain insurance on behalf of any agent of the corporation against any liability asserted against or
incurred by the agent in such capacity or arising out of the agent’s status as such whether or not the
corporation would have the power to indemnify the agent against such liability under the provisions of
this Article; provided, however, that the corporation shall have no power to purchase and maintain such
insurance to indemnify any agent of the corporation for a violation of section 5233 of the California
Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law.

Section 10. INAPPLICABILITY OF THIS ARTICLE. This Article does not apply to any
proceeding against any trustee, investment manager or other fiduciary of an employee benefit plan in such
person’s capacity as such, even though such person may also be an agent as defined in Section 1 of this
Article of the corporation. The corporation shall have power to indemnify such trustee, investment
manager or other fiduciary to the extent permitted by subdivision (f) of section 207 of the California
Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law.

ARTICLE XII
INSURANCE

Section 1. INSURANCE. The Corporation shall have the right to purchase and maintain
insurance to the full extent permitted by law on behalf of its officers, directors, employees, and other
agents, to cover any liability asserted against or incurred by any officer, director, employee, or agent in
such capacity or arising from the officer’s, director’s, employee’s or agent’s status as such.

ARTICLE XIII
MAINTENANCE OF CORPORATE RECORDS

Section 1. MAINTENANCE OF CORPORATE RECORDS. The Corporation shall keep:

(a)      Adequate and correct books and records of account;

(b)      Written minutes of the proceedings of the Board and committees of the Board; and

(c)      Such reports and records as required by law.

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ARTICLE XIV
INSPECTION RIGHTS

Section 1. RIGHT TO INSPECT. All persons shall have the right to inspect any and all
documents subject to inspection under the California Public Records Act.

Section 2. MAINTENANCE AND INSPECTION OF ARTICLES AND BYLAWS. The
Corporation shall keep at its principal office the original or a copy of the Articles and Bylaws as amended
to the current date, which shall be open to inspection at all reasonable times during office hours.

ARTICLE XV
REQUIRED REPORTS

Section 1. ANNUAL REPORTS. The Board shall cause an annual report to be sent to the
Board members within 120 days after the end of the Corporation’s fiscal year. That report shall contain
the following information, in appropriate detail:

(a)     the assets and liabilities, including the trust funds, of the Corporation as of the end of the
fiscal year;

(b)      the principal changes in assets and liabilities, including trust funds;

the Corporation’s revenue or receipts, both unrestricted and restricted to particular
(c)
purposes;

the Corporation’s expenses or disbursements for both general and restricted purposes;
(d)

(e)      any information required under these bylaws; and

an independent accountant’s report or if none, the certificate of an authorized officer of
(f)
the corporation that such statements were prepared without audit from the Corporation’s books and
records.

Section 2. ANNUAL STATEMENT OF CERTAIN TRANSACTIONS AND
INDEMNIFICATIONS. As part of the annual report provided to the Board, or as a separate document if
no annual report is issued, the Corporation shall, within 120 days after the end of the Corporation’s fiscal
year, annually prepare and furnish to each director a statement of any transaction or indemnification of
the following kind:

(a)      Any transaction:

(1)     in which the Corporation, or its parent or subsidiary, was a party

in which an ―interested person‖ had a direct or indirect material financial interest,
(2)
and

(3)     which involved more than $5,000 or was one of several transactions with the
same interested person involving, in the aggregate, more than $5,000.

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For this purpose, an “interested person” is either: (1) any director or officer of the Corporation, its
parent, or subsidiary (but mere common directorship shall not be considered such an interest, or (2) any
holder of more than 10 percent of the voting power of the Corporation, its parent, or its subsidiary. The
statement shall include a brief description of the transaction, the names of interested persons involved,
their relationship to the Corporation, the nature of their interest, provided that if the transaction was with a
partnership in which the interested person is a partner, only the interest of the partnership need be stated.

ARTICLE XV
BYLAWS CHANGES

Section 1. BYLAWS CHANGES. Power to repeal or amend these bylaws and to adopt
additional bylaws may be executed at any meeting of the Board provided that all such action and
discussion fully adhere with the posting requirements of the Ralph M. Brown Act. Such action shall
require a 2/3 vote of the Voting Directors then in office, provided that a quorum is present.

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APPENDIX N – DATA AND ASSESSMENT

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM DESIGN
Tassajara Preparatory High School (TPHS) will deliver curriculum to students in a variety of ways,
including but not limited to the following:
Project Based Learning. Project Based Learning (PBL) requires the bridging of inter-related
disciplines, such as reading, writing, and math, with content areas such as humanities, science and social
sciences through research, collaboration and presentation in order to answer a question, solve a problem,
or to create a work of art. PBL is driven by teacher initiative and organization, student creativity and
inquiry, group work, and production of learning products. The requirements of the product are defined by
the teacher. The learning product can take many forms including any combination of the following
examples: a video, single or multiple written documents, artwork, a musical composition, a play, a
demonstration, an exhibit, etc.
Service Learning. Service learning requires students to identify an issue in their community, research
the situation, propose a solution, take action to correct the problem, and then reflect upon their work as it
relates to their classroom learning. It can be in the form of project based learning or student internships.
Service Learning is aimed at teaching students their civic responsibilities and how their individual or
group actions can make a positive difference in society.
Technology Based Instruction. Technology will be woven seamlessly into the curriculum at Tassajara
Prep. Every student will be given a portable computing device. All teachers will guide students to use
current web tools including wikis, blogs, podcasts, mash-ups, and the use of collaborative web based
documents as part of their daily academic work. Use of these tools allows students to reach beyond their
classroom to interact and collaborate with other people and ideas around the world, generating enormous
shared knowledge.

Traditional and Innovative Teaching and Learning. To ensure college readiness as well as success in
meeting high school learning standards, students will experience traditional educational methodologies
including lecture and discussion, research papers, and essay exams. Students will also benefit from
instructor and peer led innovations such as Model United Nations, City of the Future simulations, self-
paced and group tutorials, and inter-disciplinary learning communities.
Co-Curricular and Extra-Curricular Learning. A variety of activities will be offered to develop the
whole person including art, drama, speech, music, athletics, wellness and fitness programs, school clubs
and activities. Career exploration will be facilitated through job shadowing, internships, college visits, in-
class speakers from the community, and college and career fairs and workshops held at the school.

HOW LEARNING BEST OCCURS
Tassajara Prep believes that learning best occurs when students are engaged in a comprehensive
curriculum through innovative instructional design in an environment that promotes learning in a
challenging and exciting manner. A comprehensive curriculum, we believe, is one that sets subjects in
context and demonstrates to students the interconnectedness of core knowledge. Members of Tassajara
Prep’s faculty will be encouraged to use innovative teaching methods and, to the greatest degree possible,
collaborate on curriculum and school governance, as a means of increasing their sense of ownership and
involvement with the school community. Tassajara Prep believes that a school should be a dynamic
learning community embodying the best practices of teaching and learning. To this end, Tassajara Prep
will provide a safe, connected, flexible learning community.

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Tassajara Prep also believes that learning best occurs in an environment that is structured to support
learning for each and every student. To achieve that objective, we will draw from the work of Linda
Darling-Hammond, The School Redesign Network at Stanford University, the Coalition for Essential
Schools, and other respected educational research to incorporate the following key features:

    Common Focus
    High Standards and Performance-based Assessment
    Personalization
    Continuous Relationships
    Authentic Curriculum
    Adaptive Pedagogy
    Knowledgeable and Skilled Teachers
    Devoted faculty time to collaborate and develop professionally
    Family and Community Connections
    Democratic Decision-making

Academically Low-Achieving Students. At Tassajara Prep, low-achieving students will be defined as
those who perform at basic level on the California State Standards Exams, and/or those who earn one or
more C- or below per grading period. They may also fall below the learning behavior, language
acquisition, and fine & gross motor skills in comparison with their peer group.

At-risk students are defined as those who perform at below basic or far below basic level on California
Standards Exams and/or do not pass the California High School Exit Exam on the first attempt and/or
who earn one or more failing grade per grading period. They may also be identified by informal teacher
assessments or prior progress reports.

Students from either of these groups may or may not qualify for special education or EL services (as
discussed below).

Tassajara Prep considers low-achieving and at-risk students as students who have not realized their full
achievement potentials.

Parents of at-risk or low-achieving students will be contacted and consulted in the development of
strategies to meet the specific needs of the student through the Student Success Team (SST) process. An
SST uses a systematic problem-solving approach to assist students with concerns that are interfering with
success. The SST clarifies problems and concerns, develops strategies and organizes resources, provides
a system for accountability, and serves to assist the parent, the teacher, and the student.

After the implementation and follow-up of an SST plan, a second meeting may be held to discuss further
recommendations. If the problem persists, revisions to the plan may be discussed, and a referral for
special education evaluation may be considered necessary by the SST.

Educational research and best practices in pedagogy indicate that low-achieving and at-risk students
benefit from learning experiences that are relevant to their lives, include multiple modes and measures,
and have clear and high expectations combined with a supportive learning environment. Additionally,
low-achieving and at-risk students benefit greatly from placement in a heterogeneous classroom. Low-
achieving and at-risk students will be thoroughly integrated into the entire student body at Tassajara Prep

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and participate fully in all aspects of the curriculum. Tassajara Prep teachers will use the well-researched
and documented pedagogical strategies of complex instruction and heterogeneous group work to support
these students in the content standards based courses. The student, his/her parent and school counselor
will determine what additional supports are needed and should be accessed through the SST. These
supports can consist of daily tutoring, weekly office hours held by each teacher, study skills classes, and
one-on-one and small group sessions with the teacher each week. Each student’s progress will be
regularly monitored by his/her Advisory teacher.

The following list provides examples of the methods by which Tassajara Prep will serve its low-achieving
and at-risk students. These services will be available to all Tassajara Prep students.

Faculty Office Hours. On Tuesdays and Thursdays each week, classroom teachers will hold office hours
between 3:15 pm and 4:30 pm. The teachers will also have office hours by appointment for mornings and
Wednesday afternoons. Low-achieving, at-risk, SPED and EL students will be provided an Academic
support class during the school day where they receive extra help and work on study skills. Tassajara Prep
will also provide an extra class during the school day for students with multiple D/F grades. Total access
time to teachers if a student is in one of these support classes and attends Tuesday/Thursday after-school
office hours is 20 hours per week. Additionally, tutoring will be available for all students from 3:00 pm
to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday in the Student Lounge. During the support sessions and after-school
hours, the teachers will re-teach material, provide additional support for completing assignments, and
provide additional individualized instruction. Moreover, since all Tassajara Prep classes are inclusive, the
teachers will differentiate instruction all day, every day.

Academic Support / Study Skills. During the regular semester, students will have one daily period in
which they complete their homework with the support of student study groups and an adult supervisor.
The additional support class for students at risk of failing will include building skills such as time-
management, organization, test-taking strategies, exam preparation strategies, study strategies, research
skills, reading skills, math skills, and more.

Faculty Discussions / Interventions / Individual Plans. During weekly faculty meetings and weekly
staff collaboration days, teachers from all grade levels will meet and discuss individual low-achieving and
at-risk students. The discussions will focus on tracking progress, identifying areas of need and effective
strategies for working with the individuals.

Teachers from all grade levels will meet with low-achieving and at-risk students and their parents when
necessary throughout the semester in ―intervention‖ meetings. The purpose of the meetings is to build
consensus on how to support the individual student, with specific responsibilities delegated to the
students, parents and teachers. Advisory teachers monitor the student’s performance progress.

See Appendix J – Student Remediation Plan for additional information.

Academically High-Achieving Students. Tassajara Prep’s curriculum and academic program are, among
other objectives, directly meant to support, encourage, and sustain high achievement. At Tassajara Prep,
academically high-achieving students will be those who perform at an Advanced level on California State
Standards Exams and/or who consistently earn ―A‖ grades in a majority of their courses. Four of the core
content areas will offer at least one, if not two, Advanced Placement (AP) Courses and/or College Level
Courses. The differentiated curriculum will regularly provide high achieving students with opportunities
to deepen their study of concepts and subject matter via specialized projects and assignments. Finally, the
Tassajara Prep structure will encourage high achieving students to concurrently enroll in college level
courses for more advanced study.
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While all qualified students at TPHS have access to our Advanced Placement courses, those who are
especially high-achieving can access, in addition:

 Advanced classes in each subject,
 Articulated enrollment with local community colleges, California State Universities, Universities of
California, and other post-secondary instruction,
 A full range of academically enriching clubs and activities including Model UN, Leadership,
Technology Club, etc.,
 The opportunity for independent work/research and/or graded Focus Projects with faculty members
in their areas of interest.

English Learners. Tassajara Prep will meet all applicable legal requirements for English Learners as it
pertains to annual notification to parents, student identification, placement, program options, EL and core
content instruction, teacher qualifications and training, re-classification to fluent English proficient status,
monitoring and evaluating program effectiveness, and standardized testing requirements. Tassajara Prep
will implement policies to assure proper placement, evaluation, and communication regarding EL’s and
the rights of students and parents. These policies are documented in Section II-H — English Language
Learners in the main body of the petition.

Home Language Survey. Tassajara Prep will administer the home language survey upon a student’s
initial enrollment into Tassajara Prep (on enrollment forms).

CELDT Testing. All students who indicate that their home language is other than English will be
CELDT tested within thirty days of initial enrollment and at least annually thereafter between July 1 and
October 31st until re-designated as fluent English proficient.

Tassajara Prep will notify all parents of its responsibility for CELDT testing and of CELDT results within
thirty days of receiving results from the publisher. The CELDT will be used to fulfill the requirements
under the No Child Left Behind Act for annual English proficiency testing.

Reclassification Procedures. Reclassification procedures utilize multiple criteria in determining whether
to classify a pupil as proficient in English including, but not limited to, all of the following:

    Assessment of language proficiency using an objective assessment instrument including, but
not limited to, the California English Language Development Test or CELDT.
    Participation of the pupil’s classroom teachers and any other certificated staff with direct
responsibility for teaching or placement decisions of the pupil to evaluate the pupil’s
curriculum mastery.
    Parental opinion and consultation, achieved through notice to parents or guardians of the
language reclassification and placement including a description of the reclassification process
and the parents’ opportunity to participate, and encouragement of the participation of parents
or guardians in the reclassification procedure including seeking their opinion and consultation
during the reclassification process.
    Performing at the basic level or higher on the California State Standards Exams.

Strategies for English Language Learner Instruction and Intervention. Tassajara Prep will serve EL
students at the school site through an inclusion model program. Under this program, the EL student is

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enrolled in a regular class and the teacher differentiates instruction to help with English language
acquisition.

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Tassajara Prep shall comply with all applicable State and Federal Laws in serving students with
disabilities. These laws include, but are not limited to, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (―Section
504‖), the Americans with Disabilities Act (―ADA‖), and the Individuals with Disabilities in Education
Improvement Act (―IDEA‖).

Tassajara Prep shall be categorized as an LEA in conformity with Education Code Section 47641(b).
Tassajara Prep will comply with a Memorandum of Understanding (―MOU‖) between the Charter
Schools and ECOE SELPA.

Tassajara Prep shall comply with all state and federal laws related to the provision of special education
instruction and related services and all SELPA policies and procedures. Tassajara Prep shall be solely
responsible for its compliance with Section 504 and the ADA.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Tassajara Prep recognizes its legal responsibility to ensure that no
qualified person with a disability shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation, be
denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program of the school. Any
student who has an objectively identified disability that substantially limits a major life activity, which
includes, but is not limited to, learning, is eligible for accommodation by the school.

Services for Students under the “IDEA”. Tassajara Prep will provide special education instruction and
related services in accordance with the IDEA, Education Code requirements, and applicable policies and
practices of the Special Education Local Plan Area (―SELPA‖). Tassajara Prep shall be categorized as an
LEA in conformity with Education Code Section 47641(b). Tassajara Prep will comply with a
Memorandum of Understanding (―MOU‖) between the Charter Schools and ECOE SELPA.

Tassajara Prep will follow SELPA policies and procedures, and will utilize SELPA forms in seeking out
and identifying and serving students who may qualify for special education programs and services, and
for responding to record requests and maintaining the confidentiality of pupil records.

ASSESSMENTS
Standardized Assessments. Annually, Tassajara Prep students will all take part in STAR/CST,
CAHSEE, CELDT (if necessary) and California Healthy Kids Survey. They may also take Advanced
Placement Tests, and a variety of college entrance exams, including the PSAT, SAT, SATII, and the
ACT. In the 2012-2013 school year, students will not participate in the CAHSEE as there will be no 10th
grade students enrolled.

Uses of Standardized Assessments. The STAR/CST will assist us to evaluate the knowledge our
students possess both as a whole and individually, the success rates of our teachers, and the strength of
our curriculum. We will also use the information to make appropriate class placements. While the
STAR/CST will not be the only basis for class placement as they will be used in conjunction with the
grade the student received previously in the same content area, they will play an important role in the
decision making process. The CAHSEE is similar to the STAR/CST because it helps us to assess where
the student is and in which areas they might need additional support. If a student does not pass the
CAHSEE successfully, they will receive extra support during their academic enrichment class in order to
supplement and further develop their skills. The CELDT plays an important role in the assessment and
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evaluation of English language learners. The students will receive the appropriate English language
support based on their CELDT scores. The California Healthy Kids Survey is an important factor in
determining what services, with regards to academic and personal/social counseling interventions, will be
provided to the student population. It is a vital resource in assessing students’ perception of school
climate.

Another assessment on campus will be Fast ForWord, a research-based literacy and reading program that
select students will participate in. The students will be selected based on their reading levels; the majority
of participants will be students in special education and/or English language learners.

The PSAT will be primarily used as baseline data to gauge student knowledge in addition to being a
predictor of how they might score on the SAT. The data is valuable to all stakeholders in that the areas in
which a student has room for improvement are identified. The SAT, in addition to playing an important
role in the college application process, is another tool that gathers data about student knowledge. Fast
ForWord is a similar tool in that it gathers data based on student knowledge; however, it gives more in-
depth detail about how the students are progressing and it monitors their skills because it is an ongoing
program instead of a one-off exam at certain times of the year.

Students at Tassajara Prep will be expected to pass all grade-level assessments. The assessments used by
Tassajara Prep will compare each student’s individual achievement to state, national, and collegiate
standards. Letter grades will be assigned for core course work and will be consistent with UC GPA
standards. Mastery of content and skills is a fluid process and all students learn at different rates.

In-Class Assessments. Tassajara Prep will deliver a portion of its curriculum through project-based
learning; therefore, the assessments in the classroom will reflect this student-centered approach. While
traditional assessment methods, such as multiple-choice exams and quizzes, will still be used to collect
data and assess student knowledge, other assessments that better gauge the students’ ability to critically
think about and respond to questions about their knowledge base will be used as well. These assessments
are graded and non-graded benchmarks, and they range from quick verbal check-ins, formal
student/teacher conferences, written reflections, and written assignments to the Presentation of Learning
(POL).

The Presentation of Learning (POL) is a method for students to exhibit their cumulative work and
knowledge in a certain content area. The students select a project that they are particularly proud of, and
present it to the teacher, their parents and their peers. The teacher has a rubric form that students receive
ahead of time and the entire panel is able to ask questions and further investigate the information the
student has presented. The POL has multiple components, but the most important piece is the reflective
piece in which they go over the process, what went right or wrong, their experience and the information
they learned, not only about the project topic, but also about themselves.

Uses of In-Class Assessments. Formative assessment will occur multiple times daily in the classroom.
The information gleaned from these assessments will be used to get an accurate read on student
understanding. Teachers will use this knowledge to adjust their lessons and the method in which they
teach so that they can ensure that all students are receiving and understanding the content. Summative
assessment will be used in the traditional sense at the end of Chapters, Units, and Projects to gauge
student retention of knowledge. Teachers will be free to allow students second and third opportunities on
summative assessments.

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Counseling Assessments. Tassajara Prep’s counseling department, in keeping with the American School
Counselor Association National Model, will ensure that students are empowered with the necessary
knowledge to make educated decisions about their personal/social, academic and career opportunities and
choices. In imparting this knowledge through classroom guidance, presentations and one-on-one
meetings, the students will participate in pre/post tests that focus on attitude, knowledge and skills. The
pre/post tests are more than surveys because they will be assessing the aforementioned components the
students have or possess on a certain topic, such as bullying.

Uses of Counseling Assessments. Counseling assessment data is used to assess the knowledge students
have about a certain topic. If the post-test does not differ greatly from the pre-test, it is indicative that the
students need more support and education about it. The data drives the counseling department because
instead of participating in ―random acts of guidance,‖ it participates in data driven prevention and
intervention. Additionally, counseling assessments drive topics for the Daily Advisory.

MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND OTHER USES OF DATA
“The measurable pupil outcomes identified for use by the charter school. „Pupil outcomes,‟ for purposes
of this part, means the extent to which all pupils of the school demonstrate that they have attained the
skills, knowledge, and attitudes specified as goals in the school‟s educational program.”
— California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(B)
Governing Law: The method by which pupil progress in meeting those pupil outcomes is measured.
California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(C)

Measurable Student Outcomes. Tassajara Prep’s outcomes are designed to align with the particular
school’s mission, curriculum and assessments and the California State Standards for courses offered at the
high school. Upon graduation from the school, students will be able to meet each specific school’s
Expected School-Wide Learning Results (ESLRs).

Graduates will achieve a C- or better in the courses required for graduation from Tassajara Prep as an
indication of their ability to meet the ESLRs of the school. See II. Overview of the Educational
Program at Tassajara Prep in Appendix O – Family-Student Handbook for a table comparing
Tassajara Prep’s graduation requirements to state graduation requirements and California university
entrance requirements.

Academic Performance Index / Adequate Yearly Progress. Tassajara Prep aims to perform in the top
20% of the state on the Academic Performance Index (API) and meet 7 out of 7 Adequate Yearly
Progress (AYP) criteria. Tassajara Prep will pursue continuous growth on the API and, if applicable, its
API growth target. Tassajara Prep will also continuously pursue AYP.

Methods of Measurement. The following assessment tools will be used annually to assess student
progress in meeting the desired student outcomes:

    POLs
    California State Standards Exams
    California High School Exit Exam
    California English Language Development Test
    9th Grade Test of Physical Fitness
    Cumulative Final Exams
    Advanced Placement Exams
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    PSAT
    SAT
    SAT Subject Tests
    ACT

At the end of each semester, student performance in the following areas will be evaluated:

    Progress in coursework
    Progress toward achieving UC (A-G) Entrance Requirements
    Progress toward achieving Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals

Annual student performance-based rubrics for individual courses include:

    Completion of all graduation requirements
    Applications to colleges
    Acceptance letters to colleges

USE AND REPORTING OF DATA
The primary tool to be used for capturing student data is PowerSchool or another Student Information
System (SIS), a database designed specifically for school use. In addition, the school will utilize the
NavianceTM data base system to capture all college data. The two systems combined have the capability
to record results for all of the tools described in the previous section.

Collection

    Standardized assessment results will all be available electronically and will be uploaded by
the COO or his/her designee.
    All results from assessments given at the school will be input by faculty members.
    All information pertaining to student goals will be input into SIS by students or SPED
teachers.
    Seniors, Advisory Teachers, and parents will enter all college data into the NavianceTM
system.

Analysis

    Individual students, their parents and the counselor will analyze each student’s individual
performance, and their progress towards meeting Tassajara Prep’s graduation requirements.
    The school faculty will analyze student grading data to identify students who might need
additional support. They will do this every five weeks for individual students, as well as
school-wide at least two times per year.
    Tassajara Prep’s Site Board will review the data at least two times per year.

Reporting

    Results from all of the tools listed above will be available for each student and his parents to
view at all times via a secure web-based SIS platform that can be accessed from any internet
connection or on specifically designated computers at the school during regular operating

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hours.
   Annually, the school will publish a School Accountability Report Card (SARC) that will be
posted on the school’s website and made available in the school lobby.
   On an as-needed basis, the school will publish bulletins reporting general student or school
performance data.

Continuous Improvement

   Tassajara Prep is committed to using student performance data to refine and improve the
educational program. Specifically, the faculty will devote substantial amounts of time during
the Collaboration periods to determine which research-based changes to the educational
program the faculty will adopt. Additionally, the school will complete an extensive self-study
in an effort to become an accredited school through the Western Association of Schools and
Colleges (―WASC‖).

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APPENDIX O – FAMILY-STUDENT HANDBOOK

Tassajara Prep
Family-Student Handbook

2012-2013

Mission

Tassajara Prep will provide a comprehensive college-prep
environment that represents the highest academic and
civic standards for all students, establishing a solid
foundation for success in premier universities and beyond
through rigorous curricula, innovative teaching practices,
and integration of the latest technology in the classroom.

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I. Welcome to Tassajara Preparatory High School
Tassajara Preparatory High School (Tassajara Prep) WELCOMES your family to our community of
learners. Tassajara Prep is a school based on the principle that families are their children’s first and most
important teacher, and we look forward to working, learning, and teaching with you. We deeply value the
commitment you have made to send your child to a school of choice and to be a part of Tassajara Prep.

Family–Student Handbook Use and Purpose
This handbook is designed to help Tassajara Prep families get acquainted with the school and to serve as a
guide to the policies and procedures that govern Tassajara Prep operations. It explains some of our
philosophies, beliefs, structures, procedures, and policies. This Family-Student Handbook is intended to
be an official procedure guide for your daily interaction with Tassajara Prep. Kindly keep in mind that
Tassajara Prep is a growing and changing organization. As such, the school reserves full discretion to add,
modify or delete at any time parts of this Family-Student Handbook, or the policies and procedures on
which they may be based. Tassajara Prep will keep you informed when substantive changes occur.

Charter Schools in California
Charter schools are nonsectarian public schools of choice that operate with freedom from many of the
regulations that apply to traditional public schools. The “charter” establishing each such school is a
performance contract detailing the school’s mission, vision, educational program, goals, students served,
methods of assessment, and ways to measure success. A charter school is responsible for meeting state
standards, but it is free to develop the curriculum, methods, and mechanisms to best meet and exceed the
standards. Charter schools are accountable to their chartering entity—in our case, the State of California
Board of Education—to produce positive academic results and adhere to the terms of the charter contract.
Charter schools in California are initially granted a charter for three years. At the end of the charter term,
schools seek renewal of their charter based on successful academic results and fiscal practices.

Tassajara Prep Governance and Oversight
Tassajara Prep is operated by the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (TVLC), which also operates the
kindergarten-through-eighth grade Livermore Valley Charter School and the 9th -12th grade Livermore
Valley Charter Preparatory High School. The TLVC Board of Directors is the governing body of the
organization. It is responsible to the chartering entity (the State Board of Education) for ensuring that the
requirements of its charters are met and that its schools are legally, financially, and educationally sound.
A majority of the TVLC Board must come from the site boards of the schools it operates. The agenda,
minutes and meeting dates of the TVLC are published on its Website: www.tvlcboard.org.

The

Tassajara Prep Site Board consists of members elected by the families of Tassajara Prep students who
serve terms specified in the TVLC By-Laws. (NOTE: The initial members of the Tassajara Prep Site
Board were appointed prior to the opening of the school. Elections to fill vacant seats on the board will be
held in the early fall of 2012 and in the fall annually thereafter.) The Tassajara Prep Site Board is
responsible for oversight of school operations including staffing, educational program development,
student activities, budgeting, and policy and procedures. The agenda, minutes and meeting dates of the
Tassajara Prep Site Board are published on its Website: www.TassajaraPrep.org.

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II. Overview of the Educational Program at Tassajara Prep
Vision
Tassajara Preparatory High School aims to instill our students with a passion for learning and creativity
through a partnership of ardent educators, staff, and families. Our graduates will be accomplished
communicators and critical thinkers, with a commitment to values of self-discipline, integrity,
independence, collaboration, social responsibility, and community service.

Philosophy
Tassajara Preparatory High School will educate students from Dublin and the greater Tri-Valley area
whose families are seeking a college preparatory education in a small school environment. All course
work at the school will be designed to help students prepare for the rigors and challenges of a four-year
college or university. Tassajara Prep will offer a challenging curriculum based upon the California State
Standards and admission to the University of California system. Successful completion of the academic
program at Tassajara Prep will expose students to the particular academic challenges they will face in
college: extensive reading, large-scale research papers and projects, lecture-format classes, and high-
stakes testing. In addition, Tassajara Prep students will be practiced public speakers. The culture of the
school is built around the ideal of college success for all.

Educational Program Design
The Tassajara Prep educational program design is structured around the concept of ―pathways.‖ A
pathway is neither an academically focused major nor a fixed course track; instead it combines a personal
goal and a flexible route to its achievement. The choice of a pathway is intended to encourage students to
consider the range of opportunities before them and to help them understand the choices they must make
and the skills they will have to master to take advantage of these opportunities. Completing a pathway
will not shrink a student’s breadth, but allow greater focus in an area of interest and the opportunity to
achieve a meaningful goal in a focus of interest.

Pathways at Tassajara Prep are oriented around four core options:

   Arts & Humanities
   Applied Sciences and Technology
   Business and Entrepreneurship
   Sustainability and Environmental Studies

While some course selections are implicit in a given pathway, most of the time students from all pathways
will be intermingled in the sections, with a student’s individual pathway reflected in the projects assigned
and the student’s own research and reading focus. In the upper grades, opportunities for internships with
local organizations and businesses will be oriented around the various pathways and a senior project or
thesis centered on the student’s pathway goal is a graduation requirement.
Students will establish their pathway entering 10th grade. Their choice will be based upon their interests,
their 9th grade experiences, and guidance from parents and school counselors. The selection of a pathway
is not something intended to be taken lightly, but it will certainly be possible to change pathways during a
student’s years at Tassajara Prep. Indeed, as students mature, thoughtfully modified goals are to be
welcomed and will be accommodated by the school.

Academic Courses
All curricula at Tassajara Prep will be based upon the Common Core State Standards and designed to
develop a foundation of basic skills as well as cultivate higher-order thinking and problem solving-skills.

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The curriculum will be intellectually challenging and linked to students’ lives and interests. Students
achieving substantially above grade level expectations will have access to more advanced studies. All
students will be required to meet the basic curriculum requirements set by the State of California Board of
Education to graduate. In addition, each student attending Tassajara Prep will be required to meet the ―a-
g‖ requirements needed for admission to a California State University, a University of California or other
institution of higher learning. The following table compares Tassajara Prep’s graduation requirements to
state graduation requirements and California state university entrance requirements.

Tassajara Prep Graduation Requirements

California High                                                       Tassajara Prep
School Graduation           CSU Entrance          UC Entrance           Graduation
Academic Subjects                  Requirements              Requirements          Requirements         Requirements

31                                                                   31
A : History/Social Science                                                     2                     2
B : English                                          3                         4                     4                     4

C : Mathematics2                                     2                         3                     3                     4

D : Laboratory Science3                              2                         2                     2                     3

E : Foreign Language4                                1                         2                     2                     3

F : Visual/Performing Arts4,5                        1                         1                     1                     1

G : Electives (College Prep)6                        0                         1                     1                     4
Health                                              0.5                                                                   0.5
1
History/Social Science = 1 year of US History/Geography, 1 year of World History/Culture/Geography, & ½ year (semester) of Civics/US
Government, & ½ year (semester) of Economics
2
Mathematics = CA HS diploma includes 1 year of Algebra I ; CSU/UC and TPHS include Algebra I, Intermediate Algebra & Geometry
3
Laboratory Science = 1 year each of Biology and Physical Science for CA HS diploma. Includes Biology, Chemistry and Physics with labs
for TPHS
4
CA High School Requirements of 1 year of either Foreign Language or Visual & Performing Arts
5
Visual/Perfroming Arts = one year of visual and performing arts chosen from the following: dance, drama/theater, music or visual art.
6
Electives = CSU/UC requires 1 year from approved courses in history, English, advanced Mathematics, lab science, foreign language, social
science, or fine arts

Students may satisfy the math and foreign language elements of the ―a-g‖ requirements in 8th and 9th
grades.
All students in grade nine, whether or not they are enrolled in a physical education class or participate
in a block schedule, will take The State Board of Education (SBE) designated FITNESSGRAM® as the
Physical Fitness Test (PFT) for students in California public schools.

For more information, see the description on Physical Education in APPENDIX D – DRAFT COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS.

Additionally, graduates will pursue the following outcomes:

     Complete with a C- or better the UC/CSU entrance requirements (A-G) for college

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admission.
   Apply to and be accepted for admission to at least one college.
   Complete California State Standards Exams with Proficiency or above.

Grading Scheme
In calculating a grade point average, the following values apply:

A    4.0     C       2.0
A-   3.7     C-      1.7
B+   3.3     D+      1.3
B    3.0     D       1.0
B-   2.7     D-      0.7
C+   2.3     F       0

Note that there is neither an A+ nor an F-. Meeting every requirement results in a grade of A.

GPA will be based on a 4.0 scale (A=4). One extra point will be added for each A, B, or C grade from
approved Honors, Advanced Placement, or transferable college courses, such that an A will equal five
points.

The Honor Roll will be awarded by semester in special Honor Roll assemblies. Students maintaining a
GPA of 3.33 – 3.74 will be recognized as Honor Roll recipients. Students maintaining a GPA of 3.75 or
better will be recognized as Principal’s Honor Roll recipients.

Honors Credit
Students ready for and motivated to complete class work that is more in-depth or advanced than
prescribed by the California State Standards may, if successful, qualify for honors credit. While some
subjects require that honors work be performed in dedicated sections, in most cases all students will be
integrated into comprehensive sections, with those enrolled as honors students expected to complete more
advanced, complex, or in depth work.

Entering 9th grade students will be evaluated at the beginning of the year regarding class placement.
Students will meet with their teacher and a counselor during the first weeks of school, and within one
month of the start of school those who are qualified by testing and classroom performance will be offered
the opportunity to seek honors credit. This is a decision that must not be taken lightly, and so students
and their parents will be counseled on both the benefits and challenges of honors level work. Those who
accept will be assigned to an honors section if the subject is one in which such a section is constituted.
For other subjects the honors students will be given assignments worthy of honors credit, but they will
remain in an integrated section and will not be distinguished from their peers either in group work or
classroom participation. Honors credit will be appropriately recognized on a student’s transcript.

Modified Block Schedule
Tassajara Prep will operate on a modified block schedule. With this schedule, a class meets for every
subject on Monday and Friday for approximately one hour. On other days the class periods are
approximately two hours long and half the classes meet each day. Classes that meet on Tuesday and
Thursday one week will meet on Wednesday the next; the first week’s Wednesday classes will meet on
Tuesday and Thursday the following week. This schedule allows for more in depth treatment of subject
material during the longer periods during the middle of the week and has been demonstrated to be the

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most effective schedule for covering college preparatory material. A sample table of the bell schedule is
included below.

Sample
Regular School Hours are 7:00 am – 4:15 pm Monday through Friday

Class       Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday         Thursday         Friday          Saturday

(bi-weekly)

0          7:10 – 7:45*      7:10 – 7:45*      7:10 – 7:45*      7:10 – 7:45*     Faculty-Tut*    *By invitation

1          7:45 – 8:40       7:45 – 9:45       7:45 – 9:45       7:45 – 9:45      7:45 – 8:40

2          8:45 – 9:40       10:00 -12:00      10:00 -12:00      10:00 -12:00     8:45 – 9:40     9:00 – 11:00
(S,E)

3          9:45 – 10:40      L 12:00-12:45     L 12:00-12:45     L 12:00-12:45    9:45 – 10:40    Lunch

4          10:45 – 11:40     12:45 – 2:45      12:45 – 2:45      12:45 – 2:45     10:45 – 11:40   11:30 – 1:30
(E,S)

5          Lunch             Advance           Advance           Advance          Lunch
Studies           Studies           Studies
11:40 – 12:20                                                          11:40 – 12:20
2:50 – 3:10       2:50 – 3:10       2:50 – 3:10

6          12:20 – 1:15      Tutoring*         Tutoring*         Tutoring*        12:20 – 1:15

3:15–4:10         3:15–4:10         3:15–4:10

7          1:20 – 2:20       A (1,2,3)         B (4,5,6)         A (1,2,3)        1:20 – 2:20

8          2:25 –2:50                                                             2:25 -2:50

Tutoring*                                                              Tutoring*

3:15–4:10                                                              2:55 -4:00

Saturday Academy: 9:00 am – 1:30 pm (60 hours additional instruction available per year)

Student Advisory
As an integral part of our student support plan at Tassajara Prep, we are implementing a dedicated student
advisory class of 20-25 minutes (depending on the day of the week). During this class, which is held at
the end of the school day but prior to tutoring, students will meet with a teacher to discuss assignments,
challenges and issues in a non-competitive, non-graded class to facilitate their academic and social-

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emotional growth. Additionally, as part of the administration’s commitment to not interrupt instructional
time, the counselor and administrators are free to address small group and school-wide presentations, such
as targeted assemblies, counseling topic sessions, or event planning. This time was created above the
required instructional minutes. Each teacher will develop a soft curriculum along with school-wide
expectations. Another component of this advisory time is a commitment to hold student court and address
concerns from the student body and provide bi-weekly resolutions to problems that do not proceed to the
administrative level. This advisory period will be reviewed by the faculty and administration on a
semester basis and changes may be made to increase efficacy.

Before and After School Tutoring
School will be open to students from 7:10 in the morning until 4:00 in the afternoon. There will be
supervised study space and tutoring available to assist students with homework and classroom projects. It
is the intent that those students who demonstrate the motivation and dedication to participate in this
supervised study and tutoring should find themselves with minimal homework during the rest of the day
to interfere with sports and family activities. In addition, there will be a Saturday Academy from 9:00-
1:30 (with a lunch break) twice per month for students who seek enrichment activities, extra help with
projects, or remedial tutoring. It is the philosophy of Tassajara Prep that time available will not be a
constraining factor in enabling student success.

Students with Physical or Educational Disabilities
Tassajara Prep is a member of the El Dorado County SELPA. For complete details on these policies and
procedures please refer to Tassajara Prep Policy & Procedure #300-007 Rehabilitation Act of 1973:
Section 504 Compliance and Tassajara Prep Policy & Procedure #300-008 Individuals with Disabilities
Education Act (IDEA) Compliance.

Student Success Team
Students demonstrating a need for intervention in order to attain the essential standards will be referred to
a Student Success Team for evaluation after classroom methods have been exhausted. Students are
referred to a Success Study Teams if the staff sees the need to develop an intervention plan for specific
identified needs related to a student’s academics or behavior. The team will be comprised of the
classroom teacher, the counselor, the Principal or designee, other necessary support staff, and the parent
or guardian of the child. At Tassajara Prep, we aim to have an inclusive model for our children with
special needs. We believe the regular classroom is often the best environment for our special needs
children to learn. Students with identified physical, emotional, learning, or developmental disabilities
have the right to placement in the least restrictive environment and may receive special education services
according to a written Individual Education Plan (IEP).

Student Educational Records
Student records are confidential records. In accordance with state and federal statutes, Tassajara Prep will
maintain a system of keeping student records that ensures student and parental rights to confidentiality
and privacy. The Principal, or designee, is responsible for implementing federal, state, and local policies
and procedures pertaining to student records. No records of students will be released without the express
permission of custodial parent(s) and the Principal. Recording of information in student records shall be
factual, verifiable, and shall be signed and dated.

The educators shall determine student grades and student evaluation reports. Once recorded, information
may not be deleted or destroyed except in accordance with the law. Amending or removal of information
shall be done in accordance with the law. A custodial parent or a legal guardian may challenge the content
of any part of that student’s records by submitting a written request to the Principal. If the request to
amend or remove information is refused, the parent or guardian may appeal through the TVLC Grievance
Procedure available on its website. Federal law, specifically the Family Educational Rights and Privacy

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Act, governs access to educational records. Special education policies and procedures along with other
detailed procedural safeguards are available upon request at the Tassajara Prep office. See Policy #300-
004 Student Records Maintenance, Access and Confidentiality.

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III. Communication at Tassajara Prep
Tassajara Prep strongly believes that effective communication between the family and the school
enhances the education of each child. In the Family/School Compact, parents or guardians along with the
Principal pledge to openly communicate and dialogue about the issues, challenges, and successes of their
child and the school. The school is committed to an effective communication plan that ensures Tassajara
Prep families are well versed in the mission, vision, education program and daily procedures of the
school. Communication methods include, but are not limited to, the Tassajara Prep Charter, this Family-
Student Handbook, monthly newsletters, an active website, all-school and individual emails, personal
phone calls and any other forms of communication that will keep parents and guardians informed of their
and their children’s rights and responsibilities as members of the Tassajara Prep community.

Communication with the Tassajara Prep faculty and Principal
Parents and guardians are strongly encouraged contact appropriate Tassajara Prep staff whenever a
question or problem arises, or to make constructive input on the educational program and extracurricular
activities of the school. It is most important that communication begin with the staff member having the
most direct contact with the student on the issue at hand:

   Begin by, calling or emailing the teacher concerned. Our staff is committed to
acknowledging your call or email within 24 hours. Our teachers have regular office hours,
and they can be available at other times if necessary, so if a personal meeting would be
appropriate it will be arranged.
   If you believe your issue has not been fully resolved, contact the principal by telephone or
email. Again, if a personal meeting is appropriate it will be arranged.

In the event these steps do not result in a satisfactory outcome, please refer to TVLC Grievance Procedure
available on its website for information and the steps to undertake a formal conflict resolution process.

Conferences & Grade Reports
One excellent way to communicate with your child’s teacher is during the Parent Teacher Conferences.
Conferences will be scheduled twice yearly. Remember, these meetings are by no means the only times a
parent or guardian may visit with a student’s teacher. To schedule a meeting outside regular conference
times, parents or guardians should contact the individual teacher as noted above.
To ensure that you and your child get the most out of your meetings, please be on time and follow the
following tips:

   Come with prepared questions for your child’s teacher
   Take notes during the conference
   Share any important, relevant information (e.g., changes in the child’s life)
   Don’t compare one child to any other child

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IV. Family and Community Involvement at Tassajara Prep
There are many ways that families are expected to be involved and participate at Tassajara Prep. These
are detailed in the Family/School Compact. Tassajara Prep asks that all families sign the Family/School
Compact before the first day of school. A copy is available at the end of the handbook for you to
complete.

Through the Family/School Compact Tassajara Prep parents or guardians are asked to:

   Provide Home Academic Support by:
 Ensuring your student comes to school on time, ready to learn and with a nutritious lunch
 Assisting and monitoring homework assignments
 Providing a quiet place to work
 Support school recommended actions
 Regularly reviewing this agreement with your student
   Provide School Support by:
 Supporting and adhering to the Tassajara Prep Family Student Handbook, and all
Tassajara Prep Policies and Procedures
 Actively collaborating and communicating with teachers to meet your child’s learning
needs
 Attending the two mandatory Parent Teacher Conferences each school year
   Participate in the Tassajara Prep community by:
 Attending Open Houses
 Attending school exhibitions of student work
 Attending any all-school meetings
 Being an active member of the school community, working to continuously improve the
Tassajara Prep community for all students
 Volunteering your time, talent and resources to assist in school activities, serve on
boards, committees and in school organizations, and raise funds to support school
programs

Tassajara Prep Support Organizations
To support programs and student events the Tassajara Prep several support organizations will be formed.
As members of the Tassajara Prep community you are not required to fundraise, make donations, or
volunteer time for student activities in order for your child to attend Tassajara Prep. However, all
Tassajara Prep support organizations ask that you to do whatever you can not only through donations but
through helping with fundraising and other school support activities.

Tassajara Prep Education Foundation
This foundation is being established as the principal fundraising organization for Tassajara Prep. As an
incorporated nonprofit organization it can accept tax deductible contributions from individuals,
corporations, and other donors. This organization will seek grants, pursue corporate sponsorship, and
manage such large-scale fund raising activities as are appropriate for Tassajara Prep. Those with skills or
interests relevant to these activities are encouraged to volunteer as members on the organizations board of
directors.

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Parent Teacher (Booster) Organization
A Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) at Tassajara Prep will be established as a nonprofit parent-teacher
entity whose membership includes all parents or legal guardians and staff at Tassajara Prep. The PTO will
be actively involved in providing extracurricular activities, family events, and volunteer opportunities to
create and promote a strong community environment at the school. Its mission is to establish a close
relationship between home and school by advancing opportunity for all parents to become involved in the
Tassajara Prep community. The PTO provides financial assistance to the Tassajara Prep classroom
teachers by raising funds for supplemental educational materials. The PTO also provides a forum for
sharing information on issues that impact the students in the belief that the team effort of a parent-teacher
organization helps to foster the best learning environment.

School Climate Committee (SCC)
Tassajara Prep will form a School Climate Committee to address ongoing issues regarding
communication, events, and procedures. It will meet on the first Monday of each month at 4:15-5:30 PM
in the Library. The committee will have students, parents, teachers, administrator or counselor, as well as
a board member representative. Each meeting will be open to all who wish to attend and will address
concerns and issues that arise from parents, the student body, and teachers in a supportive, solution-
oriented committee structure. It is important that students have an active and equal role in this committee.
Recommendations, if applicable, will move directly to the Tassajara Prep Site Board for review and
action.

Volunteering
Volunteering at the school is an excellent way to be involved in the education of your child. Please
partner with Tassajara Prep to make this the best school that it can be for your child. Volunteers can do a
range of work from helping in the classroom, tutoring small groups, teaching a specialty class, or joining
a volunteer committee. Tassajara Prep would not exist without the work of parent volunteers. In order for
Tassajara Prep to succeed we need this strong partnership to continue. Ideally, each family will invest 60
hours per year (or approx. 2 hours per week) to help the school achieve its mission and vision. We
recognize that each family will contribute in different ways. We welcome the participation of all parents.
We have many jobs that can be undertaken during non-school hours. At Tassajara Prep we do not want
our families to view involvement as a burden, but rather as an opportunity and privilege. Your support is
important to Tassajara Prep and we truly depend on family participation to accomplish our goals. Our
detailed volunteer form is attached at the end of the handbook and additional copies are in the office and
on the website.

Volunteer Requirements
Tassajara Prep wants to create as safe and secure an environment for our students as we possibly can.
Parents who wish to volunteer on campus or serve as drivers and chaperones on school field trips must
abide by all applicable laws, agree to abide by the policies of TVLC, and must fulfill all of the
requirements necessary to become a ―Registered Volunteer‖ prior to performing volunteer work on
campus while classes are in session. Always remember that when working with students and/or student
records, confidentiality must be maintained. Volunteers will be asked to sign a confidentiality agreement
to this effect at the Volunteer Training Session. The cost of fulfilling all volunteer requirements will be
borne by the volunteer applicant. In the event of financial hardship please contact the Tassajara Prep
administration for special consideration.

Registered Volunteers need to complete the following requirements:

Background Check:           Volunteer applicants are required to complete a registration form
giving TVLC permission to have fingerprint criminal
background checks. Background check packets containing

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instructions and all the required forms are available at the school
office. Once fingerprinting is completed it is good for the term
of your volunteer service with TVLC. The TVLC Custodian of
Records will handle the information returned from the DOJ in a
strictly confidential manner. TVLC will receive periodic ―arrest
notification‖ updates on all registered volunteers. If you
experience an incident that will trigger and ―arrest notification‖
you are advised to inform the Tassajara Prep Administration.
Failure to do so may result in the termination of your volunteer
service. Upon permanent retirement from volunteer service with
TVLC, the Registered Volunteer must notify the Tassajara Prep
Office Manager so that TVLC can file a ―No Longer Interested
Notification‖ as required by the DOJ. Please refer to Tassajara
Prep Policy #400-001 Criminal Background Checks; Tassajara
Prep Policy # 400-009 Criminal Offender Record Information;
Tassajara Prep Policy #400-010 Disqualifying Criminal
Offenses.

Tuberculosis (TB) Testing:          Registered Volunteers of Tassajara Prep must submit written
proof from a physician of an examination for tuberculosis
(TB) every two years showing that they are free of active
TB. Food handlers will be required to have annual TB
exams. The examination for tuberculosis consists of an
approved intra-dermal TB test, which, if positive, will be
followed by an x-ray of the lungs, or in the absence of skin
testing, an x-ray of the lungs. Documentation of volunteer
compliance with TB exams will be kept on file in the office.
For detailed information, please refer to Tassajara Prep
Policy #400-005 Tuberculosis (TB) Testing.

Training:        Registered Volunteers must attend a volunteer training session.

Procedures
Registered Volunteers must sign in and sign out at the office and wear their identification badges at all
times while on campus. Volunteers in the classroom are not allowed to have other children accompany
them during their volunteer service, without exception. This policy ensures safety, minimizes classroom
interruption, and promotes full concentration in each learning activity. Please refer to TVLC Policy #400-
006 which outlines volunteering on campus.

At-Home Volunteers
Parents who wish to perform volunteer work for Tassajara Prep from their home are not required to have
finger print criminal background checks performed or provide proof of current TB testing. The same
applies to those whose volunteer work, such as participation on a committee, does not bring them in
contact with students.

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V. Health and Safety at Tassajara Prep
Student Health
The school office and administrators must be notified if a student with a medical or health condition
requires accommodations at school in order to participate in the educational program. The Principal, or
designee, will arrange a meeting with the parent or guardian of the child to develop an accommodation
plan for the student’s medical or health condition. Students with diabetes, severe asthma, or severe
allergies should have an accommodation plan at the school.

Illness
We wish to provide a healthy environment for students. For the sake of others, as well as your own child,
parents are asked to keep home any child who has a fever of 100.1 degrees or higher or who shows other
symptoms of illness such as a runny nose when the mucus is thick and green or yellow; cough or
congestion that interferes with breathing and/or if wheezing; a rash of unknown origin; diarrhea,
vomiting, or severe headache. A rash of unknown origin or contagious rash requires a certificate from
your physician stating the student may return to school.

A student suspected of having a communicable disease may be excluded from school until guidelines for
readmission are met. A student should be free from fever or contagious disease for 24 hours before
returning to school. Should a student become ill at school they will be referred to the office where an
evaluation of the illness

Communicable Diseases
Communicable diseases can spread quickly through a school and dramatically affect the attendance and
learning of children. If your child has a contagious disease, he/she should be kept at home and his/her
condition reported to the school. Once a contagious disease has been reported to the school, an exposure
notice containing information about the disease will be sent home to the parents of every student in the
class of the affected student. Contagious diseases include illnesses such as:

   Amebiasis, Measles (Rubella)
   Campylobacteriosis, Meningitis, Bacterial
   Chickenpox, Mumps
   Common Cold with fever Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)
   Diphtheria, Ringworm
   Fever Rubella (German measles)
   Fifth disease (erythema infectiosum)
   Salmonellosis
   Gastroenteritis, Viral Scabies
   Giardiasis, Shigellosis
   Head Lice, Streptococcal disease (Strep Throat)
   Hepatitis, Viral, Type A Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
   Impetigo, Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
   Influenza

Students with AIDS/HIV infection shall be excluded only when the child’s physician determines that a
severe or chronic skin eruption or lesion that cannot be covered poses a threat to others. The child’s

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parents and physician will be advised in the case of measles, mumps, rubella, or chickenpox outbreaks in
the school that may pose a health threat to the immune-suppressed child.

If a student’s medical status changes, parents should provide the health office with a physician’s written
verification of the student’s medical issue, especially if it impacts in any way on his/her ability to perform
schoolwork. If necessary the Principal, or designee, will arrange a meeting with the parent or guardian of
the child to develop an accommodation plan for the student’s medical or health condition. The school
office will notify the student’s teacher(s) of any medical status changes. Please refer to TVLC Policy
#400-016 Communicable Disease Control.

Returning to School after an Illness or Prolonged Absence
A student returning to school following a serious or prolonged illness, injury, surgery, or other
hospitalization, must have written permission by their health care provider to attend school, including any
recommendations regarding physical activity limitations. A student returning to school with sutures,
casts, crutches, a wheelchair, or orthopedic brace(s) must have a physician’s written permission to attend
school and must comply with any safety procedures required by school administration.

Medications at School
Medications will be given at school only if they must be administered during school hours. Medications
should be delivered to the school by the parent/guardian. PLEASE DO NOT PUT MEDICATION IN
LUNCH BOXES OR BACKPACKS OR POCKETS. The medication must be in the original container,
with the student’s name, dosage, and frequency clearly labeled. (Pharmacies will provide a duplicate
container for school use upon request.) The appropriate release/consent form for giving medication at
school must be completed and signed by the parent and physician and will be kept on file in the health
office. All medication will be locked in a secure appropriate storage location and dispensed and logged by
designated school staff. Designated school staff will return all surplus medication to the parent/guardian
upon completion of the treatment regimen or prior to summer break. On a case-by-case basis, after
consulting with the child’s physician and parent/guardian, the Principal, or designee, may approve a
student to carry with him/her any required medication for an identified medical condition that may require
self-administration of the medication, such as but not limited to, severe asthma and/or allergies, diabetes,
or seizures. Please refer to TVLC Policy # 400-017 Medication Administration.

Restricted Physical Education Activities
If, for any reason, you feel your child should have restricted physical activity, please provide a note for
the health office. For releases from PE activity for a period of longer than 3 days, please provide the
office with note from your child’s health care professional stating the reason and the length of the
restriction. During this time, alternative assignments will be given for equal credit. This information will
be forwarded to both the classroom and the PE teacher.

Emergency Medical Care and Basic First Aid
Tassajara Prep staff will be trained in First Aid and CPR. In the event of a life-threatening situation
Tassajara Prep will call 911. For other injuries and illnesses that may occur, Tassajara Prep will provide
basic first aid and notify the people listed on the Blue Emergency Card in the priority indicated. Parents
should keep student health information and emergency contact information up to date; having current
information is of critical importance should an accident, illness, or injury occur that requires medical
attention.

Ready to Learn Policy
Parents are responsible for ensuring their child comes to school each day ready to learn. Students are
―Ready to Learn‖ if they:

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   Have received a good night’s sleep
   Have eaten a complete and nutritious breakfast
   Come to school dressed in clean, appropriate clothing
   Practice good hygiene (i.e., hair is washed and combed, teeth are brushed, etc.)
   Come prepared with homework completed

Food and Nutrition
In order for your child to learn as best as possible each day, he or she requires a nutritious, well-balanced
diet. Please make every effort to feed your child a nutritious breakfast each day before school. Our school
cannot provide snacks each day, we will have no vending machines available, and our school day is
longer than others. Your child will get hungry. Send your child to school each day with a healthy,
adequate snack, lunch and non-perishable drink.

Hygiene
As a part of coming to school ―Ready to Learn,‖ your child needs to come to school clean. Good hygiene
for children includes bathing on regular basis along with brushing their teeth and brushing or grooming
their hair each day. With older students, body odor can become an issue. Children will be active each day.
Please do not hesitate to send antiperspirant or deodorant to school with your students especially on their
designated PE days. Children can become the target of teasing and avoidance by other students if they
constantly come to school untidy. Please help your child develop good hygiene habits.

Sleep
It is very important for your child to get the appropriate amount of sleep. As active, growing individuals,
children require anywhere from 8 to 10 hours of sleep nightly. A routine is often helpful in making sure
your child gets enough sleep. Please set a regular bedtime for your child and enforce it. Help your child
get the proper amount of sleep they need each night.

Teen Suicide Prevention
Suicide is a significant cause of death among American teenagers, and Tassajara Prep is committed to
doing everything possible to prevent this tragedy. As stated by the National Association for School
Psychologists:

It has been well documented that children exposed to violence, life-threatening events or
traumatic losses are at greater risk for depression, alcohol and substance abuse, and
suicide. In the aftermath of tragedies such as the September 11 terrorist attacks, a school
shooting, natural disaster, or even a personal crisis, students may display warning signs of
suicidal behavior. Parents and school personnel should be particularly observant of
children and youth who may be more vulnerable because of individual circumstances.
This includes youngsters who have experienced a personal loss, abuse, or previous
traumatic event or who suffer from depression or other mental illness. Youngsters who
have these risk factors and who have been directly impacted by or witnessed another
crisis are most vulnerable.

Although many suicidal children and adolescents do not self-refer, they do show warning signs to their
peers, parents or trusted school personnel. Never ignore these signs. Suicide can be prevented with proper
intervention. Warning signs may not appear during the immediate aftermath of a tragedy. Parents and
school personnel must be good listeners and observers over the weeks to follow. Below are some
guidelines for intervening with an at-risk student.

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Warning Signs of Youth Suicide
Suicide notes: These are a very real sign of danger and should be taken seriously.

Threats may be direct (―I want to die.‖ ―I am going to kill myself‖) or, unfortunately,
Threats:
indirect (―The world would be better without me,‖ ―Nobody will miss me anyway‖). In
adolescence, indirect clues could be offered through joking or through references in
school assignments, particularly creative writing or art pieces. Young children and those
who view the world in more concrete terms may not be able to express their feelings in
words, but may provide indirect clues in the form of acting-out, violent behavior, often
accompanied by suicidal/homicidal threats.

Previous attempts:       Often the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior, which can indicate a
coping style.

Depression:      When symptoms of depression include pervasive thoughts of helplessness and
hopelessness, a child or adolescent is conceivably at greater risk for suicide.

Masked depression:       Risk-taking behaviors can include acts of aggression, gunplay, and
alcohol/substance abuse.

Final arrangements:      This behavior may take many forms. In adolescents, it might be giving away
prized possessions such as jewelry, clothing, journals or pictures.

Efforts to hurt oneself: Self-mutilating behaviors occur among children as young as elementary school
age. Common self-destructive behaviors include running into traffic, jumping
from heights, and scratching/cutting/marking the body.

Such problems may be reflected in a student’s classroom
Inability to concentrate or think rationally:
behavior, homework habits, academic performance,
household chores, even conversation.

Changes in physical habits and appearance:         Changes include inability to sleep or sleeping all the
time, sudden weight gain or loss, disinterest in
appearance, hygiene, etc.

Sudden changes in personality, friends, and behaviors:     Parents, teachers and peers are often the best
observers of sudden changes in suicidal students.
Changes can include withdrawing from normal
relationships, increased absenteeism in school,
loss of involvement in regular interests or
activities, and social withdrawal and isolation.

Death and suicidal themes:          These might appear in classroom drawings, work samples, journals or
homework.

Plan/method/access:      A suicidal child or adolescent may show an increased focus on guns and other
weapons, increased access to guns, pills, etc., and/or may talk about or allude to a
suicide plan. The more planning that takes place, the greater the potential is for
an actual attempt.

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Tips for Parents and Families
Do not be afraid to talk to your child:     Talking to your children about suicide will not put thoughts into
their head. In fact, all available evidence indicates that talking to
your child lowers the risk of suicide. The message is, ―Suicide is
not an option, help is available.”

Listen to your child’s friends:     They may give hints that they are worried about their friend but be
uncomfortable telling you directly. Be open. Ask questions.

Suicide-proof your home:            Make the knives, pills and, above all, the firearms inaccessible.

Utilize school and community resources:             This can include your school psychologist, crisis
intervention personnel, suicide prevention groups or
hotlines, or private mental health professionals.

Take immediate action: If your child indicates he/she is contemplating suicide, or if your gut instinct tells
you they might hurt themselves, get help. Do not leave your child alone. Even if
he or she denies ―meaning it,‖ stay with the child. Reassure them. Seek
professional help. If necessary, drive your child to the hospital’s emergency room
to ensure that they are in a safe environment until a psychiatric evaluation can be
completed.

Tassajara Prep intends to be proactive rather than reactive in dealing with the problem of teenage suicide.
For further information families may consult the website:

http://www.nasponline.org/resources/crisis_safety/savefriend_general.aspx.

Please

feel encouraged to contact a school counselor or any other staff member if you have any concerns
whatever.

Student Safety
Tassajara Prep takes student safety seriously. A safe learning environment allows children to grow and
attain success. If students, families, and staff are worried about their environment the opportunities for
learning will be missed. If at any time you or your child has a safety concern, please bring it to the
attention of an Tassajara Prep staff member immediately. We will deal with the issue.

Non-Motorized Transportation
Bikes, scooters, skateboards, and skates may not be ridden on campus. Students are to store skateboards
and skates in the area designated by their classroom teacher. Bicycles and scooters should be locked in the
school’s bike racks. After locking their bike or scooter, students are to leave the area immediately. If these
items are used inappropriately, the staff will confiscate them and parents will be called to pick them up at
the office. Tassajara Prep is not responsible for lost, stolen, damaged or misplaced property regardless of
whether or not it was confiscated by staff.

Emergency Drills
Emergency drills are a precautionary measure for the safety of all individuals on campus. Regular
emergency drills for students will be conducted to ensure orderly movement and placement of students in
the safest available locations. Tassajara Prep will conduct monthly drills that will reinforce proper exit
routes and safe student conduct while exiting the school buildings in a quick, quiet, and orderly manner to
a designated meeting location a safe distance from school buildings. Tassajara Prep will partner with
Dublin Fire Services to instruct students and staff in fire prevention and safety. Tassajara Prep staff and

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students will receive instructions in accordance with the school’s emergency plan. The exit plan for each
room on campus will be posted inside the room beside the exit door(s). Tassajara Prep will conduct other
emergency drills such as Duck, Cover, and Hold; Lockdown; and Shelter in Place on a regular schedule to
ensure that students and staff are familiar with all emergency procedures.

Disaster Plans
In the event of a natural or manmade disaster (including earthquake, fire, chemical or biological release,
intruder on campus, lockdown, broken gas main, flooding, etc.), Tassajara Prep will work with local
authorities to maintain a safe and controlled environment for all students and staff. The best way to
achieve this goal is to be prepared ahead of time for all possible events.

Parents will fill out the Disaster Contact Form with the names and telephone numbers of designated
persons authorized to remove their child from school.
In the event of a disaster, anyone removing a child from campus will be required to show a photo ID and
sign the child out of school before removing them.

Parents must inform the designated persons that they will be required to show a photo ID when they come
to sign the child out of school.

To prepare the staff for various disasters or emergencies the Tassajara Prep Health and Safety Committee
will provide training sessions for staff that will include CPR and First Aid and Disaster Preparedness
training based on the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) model. The staff will be
familiarized with the plan for long-term evacuation in case buildings are rendered uninhabitable. They
will also be trained on how to evacuate the school population to a safer location if advised to do so by
local authorities.

Campus Security
Student safety and security is a priority at Tassajara Prep. All school staff and Registered Volunteers have
completed thorough background checks have been issued photo identification badges for ease of
recognition. All campus visitors (non-volunteer parents, grandparents, guest speakers, contractual
workers, vendors, etc.) are required to first go to the school office and produce photo identification. Once
office staff obtains clearance, the individual is issued a temporary photo ID badge that must be worn and
visible at all times.

Safe Facilities
Tassajara Prep will adhere to all applicable local and state building codes and life-safety codes. In
addition, written notification will be posted on the school premises 72 hours prior to the application of
any pesticide. The least toxic pest management practices will be the preferred method of managing pests
at the school site. Please refer to TVLC Policy #400-011 Safe Facilities.

Child Abuse
According to state law, school employees must report reasonable suspected cases of neglect, non-
accidental injury, or sexual offenses against children to Child Protective Services or local law
enforcement agencies. Tassajara Prep is not required to inform parents or guardians if Child Protective
Services is notified of suspected abuse. State law protects Tassajara Prep and its staff who are required by
law to report reasonable suspected abuse from civil or criminal liability. Please refer to Tassajara Prep
Policy #400-002(A) Reporting Suspected Child Abuse/Neglect.

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VI. Family, School, and Student Policies
The goals of the Family, School, and Student Policies at Tassajara Prep are to ensure the safety of the
school environment and to optimize each child’s learning. Therefore, Tassajara Prep has attempted to
develop policies that have very clear consequences for children and families. They lay out the
expectations of students who attend Tassajara Prep and the consequences that follow when these policies
are violated.

The Three School Rules: Be Safe, Be Respectful, and Be Responsible
These rules will be evident, and taught on campus and in the classroom. They will be reinforced
frequently as the need arises and the school matures. Students are expected to take responsibility for their
actions. Our discipline policy is referred to as ―progressive discipline.‖ This means that should an
infraction be repeated, the next resulting consequence may be more significant than the preceding
consequence. A STEP process of corrective behavior is initiated when a student violates a classroom
and/or school rule. For each subsequent infraction another STEP is issued. If two (2) STEPS—
infractions—are accumulated, a parent conference will be initiated to develop a behavior intervention
program through the counselor. If a student reaches three (3) STEPS, the student will face a suspension. If
a student chooses to break the rules, a consequence will follow. Parents will be informed when STEPS are
issued via the Disciplinary Incident/Action Notice.

Student Code of Conduct
In order to ensure that Tassajara Prep is a place where learning is a priority, the school must be safe at all
times. Any student action or intention that can be deemed as violating the safety of oneself or others can
result in serious consequences. Tassajara Prep asks that community members (students, staff, parents,
volunteers) follow the Guiding Principles to ensure that we are always making positive contributions to
the daily life at Tassajara Prep. The following is a non-exhaustive list of Code of Conduct and Guiding
Principle violations:

   Verbal abuse of others (using profanity, etc.)
   Intentionally hurting another person
   Willful acts of disobedience or defiance
   Threatening others physical or emotional safety
   Classroom disruption

Expected Conduct
Tassajara Prep is dedicated to providing a safe and nurturing learning environment for all our students.
Limits are clearly set and our school conduct rules are listed below:

   Be safe, respectful, and responsible
   Follow directions
   Abide by all school, classroom and campus rules
   Show regard for people and property

Unacceptable Conduct
The following types of conduct are considered unacceptable and will be subject to discipline:

   Disorderly conduct such as fighting, rock throwing, kicking, disobeying school personnel,
and disruptive behavior in the classroom

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   Verbal abuse such as swearing, talking back, or making fun of another individual
   Stealing, such as taking any school property or an individual’s property
   Destruction of property, such as writing on walls or books, ripping or tearing pages of books,
breaking equipment, or in any other way damaging school or another person’s property
   Any other misconduct that needs attention

Extra-Curricular Eligibility
Participation in extracurricular activities such as sports, clubs, and school dances is a privilege accorded
to students demonstrating satisfactory behavior and academic achievement. Students who have been
suspended within the past 30 days will require the permission of the principal to participate in
extracurricular activities. Students with any grade below a C- or a GPA below 2.25 must have a
remediation plan agreed to by the student’s counselor and relevant teachers in order to participate in
extracurricular activities. The California Interscholastic Federation, which is the governing organization
for Tassajara Prep’s interscholastic sports activities, requires that a student maintain a 2.0 GPA with no
F’s, to participate in extracurricular sports.

Items Prohibited at School
State law expressly prohibits explosives, knives, firearms, or imitation firearms, weapons or other
dangerous objects, tobacco, alcohol, and other controlled substances from school grounds. Possession of
any of these items will lead to disciplinary action. Bringing weapons of any kind onto campus are
grounds for immediate suspension and processing for expulsion.

Personal items such as toys and games shall not be brought to school without prior teacher approval for
planned school activities. Items that are disruptive and/or can cause a safety hazard do not belong at
school. Our main responsibility is to provide an environment that is safe and conducive to learning. The
school does not accept liability for the loss of students’ personal property and therefore, discourages it
from being brought to school. School personnel may confiscate any item that is not used appropriately.
Tassajara Prep is not responsible for lost, stolen, damaged or misplaced property regardless of whether or
not it was confiscated by staff.

Specifically, Tassajara Prep prohibits the following items on school campus:

   All weapons or devices that may be used to harm others. This includes chains that may be
attached to wallets
   Imitation guns, water pistols, water balloons, squirt tubes
   Matches, lighters, firecrackers, caps, fireworks
   Pepper spray, tear gas, etc
   All controlled substances such as tobacco, drugs or alcohol
   Permanent markers
   Large amounts of money, card collections, etc.
   Laser pointers

Harassment
Harassment of students, staff, and parents is prohibited. Depending on the circumstances, harassment can
include such conduct as verbal or physical threats or abuse; physical acts of aggression or intimidation;
“fighting words;” and plainly offensive language, such as racial or ethnic slurs or vulgar, lewd, or obscene
language. Please remind your child that if he/she believes, or you believe based on conversations with
your child, that he/she has been subjected to harassment, to report the inappropriate behavior to a teacher,

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Principal, or designee immediately. Students who engage in harassment shall be subject to disciplinary
action.

Bullying
Bullying is a repeated action, which makes a child feel uncomfortable, insecure, intimidated or
threatened. It is defined as repeated unwelcomed physical contact with intent to harm, embarrass or
demean another student; verbal abuse, including teasing, name calling, and harmful gossip; and emotional
abuse, including humiliation, shunning, and exclusion.

TVLC believes that every child has the right to a safe and secure environment in which to learn and
achieve success. The School disapproves of bullying in all its form and considers it a most serious
offense. Students caught bullying, or students participating in the action as an active spectator—by
encouraging the behavior to continue—can face suspension. The Principal and staff will take the lead in
creating a climate in which pupils will report immediately any bullying incident in the expectation that it
will be dealt with promptly and firmly.

Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment by staff, students, or parents is prohibited on campus and during school related
activities. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other unwelcome written, verbal
or physical conduct of a sexual nature may, in certain circumstances, constitute sexual harassment.
If a person believes he/she is a victim of sexual harassment, he/she should tell the harasser to stop and
immediately report the harassment to the Principal, or designee, teacher, counselor, or other adult in
authority. In addition, he/she should consider either filing a formal complaint against the harasser or
informing his/her parents so they can contact school officials. A substantiated charge of sexual
harassment will lead to disciplinary action. Detailed procedures for reporting and resolving sexual
harassment complaints are contained in the TVLC Sexual Harassment Policy. Please refer to TVLC
Policy #400-003(A) Sexual Harassment (Employees) and TVLC Policy #400-004(A) Sexual Harassment
(Students).

Drug, Alcohol, and Smoke-Free Environment
Tassajara Prep is committed to providing an environment free of drugs, alcohol, or tobacco products in
order to promote a safe environment that is conducive to maintaining good health and high standards of
learning. Bringing onto school premises, possessing, using, or being under the influence of intoxicating
beverages or drugs while on school premises or at any school-sanctioned activity is prohibited and will
result in disciplinary action. Please refer to the Tassajara Prep Disciplinary Policies for further
information. Smoking is prohibited on school premises, and on all Field Trips. Please refer to TVLC
Policy #300-003 Student Suspension and Expulsion; TVLC Policy #400-008(A) No Smoking.

Respect of Property and Student Liability
Building upon the need to have a safe and nurturing school, students must respect the property of the
school and others at all times. Any student action or intention that can be deemed as damaging the
property of the school or others can result in serious consequences. Examples of property violations
include:

   Stealing
   Defacing school property or property of others
   Unauthorized use of equipment

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Students who cut, deface, or otherwise damage any school property may be suspended or expelled from
school. Under California law, parents or guardians are liable for damages done to school property by their
children.

Good Neighbor Policy
Tassajara Prep shares boundaries with several private residences. We expect our community members to
respect the privacy and property of our neighbors. All of us play a role in building positive relations with
the community at large. Please be considerate of school neighbors and do not block driveways or park
illegally.

Attendance
At Tassajara Prep, we view every day as an essential learning opportunity. The school year is comprised
of 180 days of instruction and we would like to see all of our students for all 180 days. While we know
that children do occasionally get sick and that it is not in their best interest or those of their classmates for
students to be at school when they are too ill to learn, we expect excellent attendance of all of our
students. Regular attendance and being on time is critical to the learning process and helps students
develop a good attitude toward school, as well as important time management skills for their future.
Tassajara Prep, like all public schools in California, does not receive Average Daily Attendance (ADA)
funding, the main funding mechanism of our school, for any student absence, whether it is excused or
unexcused.

Parents/guardians are encouraged to schedule doctor, dentist, and other appointments for students at times
outside the school day. If an appointment must be made during school hours, please schedule it at the end
of the school day, as Tassajara Prep is only funded if a student is present when attendance is taken.
Additionally, Tassajara Prep requests that family vacations be scheduled during summer and school
recess periods whenever possible. If a child is sick and cannot function at school, please keep them home
to rest and recover. The school office should be informed promptly if your child has a communicable
disease so that we can notify other parents, if necessary.

Students are required to make up any and all work missed during any absence period. Students and
parents are responsible for contacting teachers to receive make-up work missed during any absence. In
order to participate in any extra-curricular after school or evening activity, students must be present at
school the entire day, and may not leave school before the regular dismissal time without prior approval.
Please refer to TVLC Policy # 300-001 Student Attendance for detailed information regarding the
information discussed below.

Excused Absences
Excused absences are absences where a student is too ill to report to school or has a medical, legal, or
personal appointment, or a family emergency. All absences require appropriate documentation (i.e. note
from home, a note from a doctor or medical facility, court documents, etc.). If appropriate documentation
is not provided, the absence will be considered unexcused.

A parent or guardian must notify the school the same day of the absence by telephone (456-9000) or in
person. A parent/guardian must phone in their student’s absence to the attendance by 8:30 a.m. If the
school is not notified and the student does not report to school the next day with a note, the absence will
be considered unexcused (see below). If a child exceeds ten excused absences, the school will require a
conference between parent, student, and the Principal, or designee, to devise an action plan for ensuring
the child does not fall behind in school.

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Independent Study Contracts
Tassajara Prep can receive ADA funding if a student enters into an Independent Study Contract.
Independent Study Contracts are an excellent way for students to stay up to date with assignments and
connected with their school life. Candidates for Independent Study Contracts include students who will
miss school for an extended illness, injury or bereavement. Parents are respectfully asked to notify the
Principal with as much advance notice as possible. The Principal may grant requests for Independent
Study for reasons other than extended illness, injury or bereavement.

Tassajara Prep and its staff understand that family trips can occur during the school year, and although
Tassajara Prep and its staff highly discourage such absences from school, it is feasible for a family trip to
be an excused absence if and only if the student completes and independent study contract as per Section
E of the TVLC Policy #300-001 Student Attendance. If any portion of Section E is not strictly adhered to,
then the independent study contract will be considered null and void and the absences that are the result of
a family trip will be recorded as unexcused. Students shall be given the opportunity to complete a written
independent study contract during a planned absence or to make up work missed as a result of excused
absences.

The following guidelines shall apply:

   The parent and student shall be responsible for initiating the request for an independent study
contract and for obtaining the requirements of or the completion of makeup assignments
   No student is entitled to independent study without approval by the principal
   Requests for independent study contracts must be given to the principal in advance of the
planned consecutive absences. The number of days in advance that the request for an
independent study contract must be given to the principal is equal to the number of days that
the student will be absent from school. As an example, if the student will be absent for five
(5) consecutive days, then the request for an independent study contract must be given to the
principal five (5) days in advance of the planned consecutive absences. If the consecutive
absences are unplanned due to an illness or injury the request for independent study must be
given to the principal within 24-hours of the illness or injury occurring.

Properly completed independent study contracts and makeup work shall be graded equivalent to the same
work done by the non-absent students. Teachers are not obligated to provide makeup assignments nor
accept makeup work after three school days have elapsed since the excused absence ended.

Unexcused Absences
An unexcused absence occurs when a student is absent from school or class without a valid excuse. Such
an absence could occur if a student simply skips school or fails to attend a class or classes after arriving at
school. An unexcused absence could also result from participation in a school activity where the student
did not followed established procedures for approval; absence for reasons, such as family trips or
emergencies that are not covered by an independent study contract within TVLC policies; or absence
from school or class where the student and/or parent guardian failed to follow established procedures for
either checking out of school. It is the responsibility of the parent and student to establish the excused
nature of the absence to the satisfaction of the principal or designee. All absences, which are not cleared
within two (2) days after a student’s return to school, will be recorded as unexcused.

A student with one or more unexcused absences will participate, along with his or her parents/guardians,
in a meeting with the Principal in order to address the truancy issue and to establish a plan to eliminate the
truancy problem. If the problem persists, the Principal has the authority to take disciplinary action against
the student. Three or more unexcused absences can result in the student being classified as a habitual

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truant. Students who are habitually truant may be referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency.
TVLC Policy #300-001 (Student Attendance) details procedures for the school’s approach to dealing with
unexcused absences.

Tardiness
School begins at 7:45 A.M. Teachers will begin teaching promptly. All students are expected to arrive at
school on time. If a student is repeatedly tardy, his/her parents or guardian will be contacted to discuss
options to improve timeliness.

   Three (3) Tardies—Official notices from the school
   Five (5) Tardies—Intervention Conference with student, parent/guardian and counselor or
designee; attendance plan will be developed
   Eight (8) Tardies—Second Intervention Conference with student, parent/guardian and
Principal or designee; attendance plan will be reviewed and re-drafted (if necessary) with
counseling support as appropriate
   Twelve (12) Tardies—Student may be suspended or expelled from school as per TVLC
Suspension and Expulsion Policy # 300-003

Dress Code Guidelines
The purpose of the dress code is:

   Encourage the attitude that school is a place to learn
   Ensure a focus on learning in the classroom
   Enhance safety during work and play
   Encourage greater respect and appreciation towards one another
   Promote neatness and modesty

Students should wear clothing and shoes appropriate for the weather and for fully participating in school
activities. It is an observable fact that students do better academic work when neatly dressed. There is also
a tendency to treat one another with greater appreciation and respect. With this in mind, Tassajara Prep
requests that students comply with the following dress code:

No logo wear is permitted that represents hate images; hate speech, discrimination, gangs, contraband, or
sexually explicit messages or references (e.g., sexually explicit language or graphics, alcohol, tobacco,
illegal drugs, or weapons.) Clothing, school supplies, lunch boxes, backpacks, jewelry, and headwear that
fall into the categories above are likewise not permitted.

The following articles of clothing are not permitted:

   See-through or revealing shirts
   Backless tops, strapless tops, or tank tops
   Halter tops or dresses
   Low-cut tops or dresses
   Bare-midriff tops
   Clothing that fails to conceal undergarments

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     Shorts or skirts shorter than their middle finger when arms are held down by their sides and
also not more than 5 inches above the kneecap when kneeling
     Pajamas or slippers*
     Extremely tight or excessively oversized clothes
     Pants and shorts must be worn above the hip bones. Pants and shorts may not “sag”

Headwear and dark glasses may be worn outside only. The principal or his designee may make exceptions
for special days, special events, other school activities, or medical necessity.

Shoes should be solidly on the student’s feet to help ensure safe participation in school activities (e.g.
physical education, recess, etc.). No ―flip-flops,‖ backless sandals, high heels, or shoes with wheels
(hidden or exposed) are permitted. Tight, open-toed sandals are permitted.

Any clothing, jewelry, or accessories that create safety or health concerns or cause or threaten to cause a
disruption to the educational process is prohibited (e.g. long earrings, chain belts, etc.)

     No earrings longer than 1/2 inch may be worn
     No key chains or metal fasteners longer than 8 inches may be worn with clothing
     No body piercing of any type other than the ear may be displayed
     Tattoos may not be displayed

The dress code is not negotiable and Tassajara Prep staff reserves the right to determine if a student is in
violation of the dress code. Repeated violations of the dress code shall be considered grounds for
disciplinary action. Please refer to TVLC Policy #300-002 Student Dress Code. No dress code restriction
shall be enforced in a manner that restricts a student’s observance of his or her religious faith.

Cheating/Plagiarism Policy
Students are responsible for being honest on assignments and test and not copying the work of others.
Cheating and plagiarism are not acceptable as such behavior undermines the learning process. Cheating
and plagiarism include:

     Copying or using the work of another and presenting it as one’s own
     Using ―cheat sheets,‖ looking at another student’s test, or any other assistance unauthorized
by the teacher
     Assisting or providing another student with the opportunity to cheat
     In PE, taking unauthorized short cuts on the run and fitness activities
     Talking during or after a test, before all tests have been collected

Students involved in cheating and plagiarism will be dealt with in a consistent manner regardless of the
weight of the assignment or the importance to a student’s grade for the class. If it is determined by the
teacher that cheating has occurred, the following consequences are possible:

     The student will be issued a zero for the assignment and make-up work will not be allowed
     The teacher will document the incident by contacting the parents and notifying the all
teachers on campus

* The principal or his designee may make exceptions for special days, special events, other school activities, or medical necessity.

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   Repeated offenses of cheating will result in additional disciplinary action, including
suspension

Internet Use Policy
The Internet is a place for the exchange of ideas and information. Accordingly, the Internet is an excellent
educational tool that allows students to access a wide variety of information to supplement academic
study and research. Anyone accessing the Internet via Tassajara Prep is required to sign a Tassajara Prep
Appropriate Internet Use Agreement. Tassajara Prep provides students with Internet access to further their
education and research. However, the access the Internet provides to computers and people across the
world also provides access to materials that do not have educational value in a school setting. As such,
students may encounter information and ideas they may consider obscene, controversial, abusive, or
otherwise offensive. Every reasonable effort is made to protect our students from such cyber intrusions.
Despite the risks, TVLC believes that the value of the educational information available on the Internet
far outweighs the risk that students may access information that is not consistent with educational goals
and purposes. The TVLC Appropriate Internet Use Procedures ensure that student and volunteer access to
and use of the Internet is consistent with the educational goals and purposes of Tassajara Prep. The TVLC
Appropriate Use Procedures set forth student responsibilities and duties when accessing and using the
Internet through TVLC equipment and resource network. TVLC has deemed certain uses of the Internet
inappropriate for an educational setting and therefore, not appropriate for use with TVLC equipment and
resource networks. TVLC stresses that an inappropriate use does not always mean that the use is in itself
―bad‖ or illegal, but only that the use does not further the educational goals and purposes of the School.
Students are reminded that their use of TVLC equipment and resource networks reflect upon the School,
and students should guide their activities accordingly. All students, with supportive signatures of parents
or guardians, will sign the TVLC Appropriate Use Agreement prior to any Internet Access at the School.

Cell Phones and Other Electronic Communications
Tassajara Prep understands that families have come to depend upon cell phones, pagers, and other means
of wireless electronic communication to arrange transportation and after school activities as well as for
other routine family communications. With this in mind, students are permitted to bring cell phones and
other electronic communications devices to school with them. The use of these devices during classroom
and other instructional activities, however, is disruptive to the educational process and can enable
cheating and other improper activities. Therefore, all electronic communication devices must be turned
off, not just silenced, throughout the school day, with the exception of the lunch period. Students caught
with an electronic communications device turned on will have it confiscated for the remainder of the
school day. Multiple violations will result in further disciplinary action.

In the event of an emergency, parents or guardians should contact the school office, upon which the
student will be immediately remove from class and placed in direct communication with his or her family.

Search and Seizure
It is the responsibility of the school to protect the health, safety, and welfare of all students and staff.
School officials may search students, their property, and /or the property of the school under their control
and may seize illegal, unsafe, or prohibited items. The TVLC Board of Governance requires that
discretion, good judgment, and common sense be exercised in all cases of search and seizure.

Search of Lockers and Desks
The school controls student lockers, desks, and cubbies. Staff will regularly conduct a desk and locker
inspections for cleanliness. School officials can also order an inspection of a desk or locker at any time
without notice and without consent if reasonable suspicion exists that a law or school rule has been
violated or that the health, safety, or welfare of students or staff may be in danger.

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Search of Student’s Person
Search of a student’s person, bag, or purse shall be undertaken only if there are reasonable grounds to
suspect that the student possesses a dangerous, prohibited, or illegal substance or items that may interfere
with school purposes and/or present a threat to other people or property. Employees shall not conduct
strip searches or search body cavities of any student. (Education Code 49050)

Law Enforcement Interviews
The authority of law enforcement officers extends to schools as it does to other parts of the community.
Law enforcement officers may be summoned to the campus or may come of their own initiative. School
staff will work with law enforcement as needed to maintain a safe and orderly environment. If in the
completion of their duties it is necessary for law enforcement agents to interview students, staff will work
within the constraints of the law, legal requirements, and parental notice to protect the interests of
students while recognizing the authority of law enforcement agents in the performance of their duties.
School personnel shall exercise care in ascertaining the identity and official capacity of anyone who
represents himself as an officer or law enforcement agent before allowing interviews with students at
school.

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VII. Daily Procedures and Information
Arrival and Dismissal Procedures
At Tassajara Prep, parents may drop off students from 7:00-7:40 AM in the turnaround in front of the
school. Parents are to drive slowly (below 25 MPH) as they approach the school and have students
dropped off on the right side. There is ample parking on campus. Before 7:00 AM there is no staff
supervision, and students should not arrive on campus before 7 AM.

In the afternoon, parents may pick up students from 2:50-4:15 PM using the same procedures, depending
on students’ schedules. After 4:15 PM, there is no supervision, nor expectation of supervision, unless a
student is participating in a school-sanctioned activity, club or sport. Students may call home from the
office or cell to arrange transportation. If students are on campus after school without an activity, they
will be housed in tutorial rooms. They are not allowed to loiter on campus. Parents must obey all traffic
laws and be cognizant of safety at all times.

Student Sign-In and Sign-Out Procedures
In order to promote student safety and maximize learning opportunities on campus, Tassajara Prep will be
a closed campus. This means students are not allowed to leave campus during any break or class time.
We have a quality food service and will allow students to bring meals, including retailers’ offerings, to
school to consume. The administration may, on occasion, permit supervised (with a 10-1 ratio) walking
field trips to local businesses during lunch time on “block days.” Parents would be notified prior and
have an option to allow students to do this. There would be ample supervision on campus for those who
remain behind.

In the event a student must leave school during class hours, a parent/guardian or authorized adult (as
listed on the student’s Blue Emergency Card) must sign him/her out. This also allows the School to
comply with state guidelines regarding our responsibility for student safety. Sign-In and Sign-Out forms
are located in the school office. Please come directly to the office to pick up students. Going to the
classroom can be disruptive. We will only call the student to the office when you arrive. Please refer to
TVLC Policy #300-005 Release of Students to Persons during School Hours.

Release During School Hours – Students who are released during school hours will only be released to
persons listed on the student’s Blue Emergency Card. The person signing the student out is required to
provide the following information:

    Date and Time of release
    Student’s name
    Student’s room number
    Reason for release
    If student will be returning to school
    Signature of person removing student

Returning to School – Please make every attempt to schedule appointments for your child outside of
regular school hours. If your child must leave school for an appointment but will be returning, you must
sign your child back in at the school office upon his/her return.

Visitors
TVLC policy requires that all guests and visitors sign-in at the Office. At that time visitors will be asked
to present photo identification, state the reason for their visit, and their intended destination on campus.

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At the conclusion of the visitor’s business on campus they are required to return to the office, turn in their
badge, and sign-out. Even if you are unable to volunteer at school, parents are encouraged to make regular
visits to the school. We ask that when you visit the school, you abide by the procedures outlined above
and respect the instructional time of teachers and students. If you have a matter to attend to with a teacher,
please find a mutually agreeable time to discuss the matter. Please refer to TVLC Policy #400-006
Visitors on Campus.

Emergency Release from School
There are very few occasions when the school should be closed. There are occasions, however, when
students must be dismissed early due to emergencies. An emergency closing is any unscheduled closing,
late opening, or early release of school because of inclement weather, an epidemic, breakdown in school
equipment, a threat to the safety or welfare of the students, or a locally, statewide, or nationally declared
emergency that affects the ability to operate school safety. The Principal, or designee, will determine
school closures and when late opening or early dismissal is warranted to ensure the safety of students. In
the event of a school closure or delayed opening, every effort will be made to notify Tassajara Prep
parents in a timely manner. Please refer to TVLC Policy #400-015 Emergency School Closure and
Dismissal.

Emergency Release Sign-Out Procedure – In the event of an emergency situation at the school or in the
surrounding community that requires the evacuation of the school, persons picking up students will be
directed to the Student Pick-Up Area. All individuals picking up students are required to show photo ID
and will be verified as eligible to pick up the student. The individual will then sign the student out, noting
the time, and listing the location where the student will be taken, and a phone number where the student
can be contacted.

Child Custody Issues
In cases where custody issues affect the student while at school, Tassajara Prep shall follow the most
recent court order on file with the school. It is the responsibility of the custodial parent or of parents
having joint custody to provide the school with the most recent court order. If a custody court order is not
on file, the school will rely on the information provided on the child’s enrollment form and/or Blue
Emergency Card. Please notify the office the first day of school if there is anyone who may NEVER take
a student home from school.

Lunch Program
A student lunch program is provided by Lunch Masters, a food service company. Under the food service
plan, lunches cost approximately $4.00 each. Parents can choose the lunches on-line, by phone or using
pre-order forms. With this system, a child’s name is assigned to each lunch, so there is very little chance
we will run out of lunch items the student orders. Three choices are always provided, and for a dollar
more, parents will be able to order a large portion meal for older students or big eaters. Parents will be
able to go on-line and pay in advance on a credit card and order up to a month in advance or cancel the
night before for full refund in the event that their child is ill or away from school. If your child is not a
regular student of the lunch program, but would like to buy lunch periodically, an order can be placed
within three days of the desired lunch day. During lunch, students are to be in quad, MPR or classrooms
under supervision.

Lost and Found
Found items that belong to someone else should not be taken by the person who found the item. Any
items found at the school site should be taken to the lost and found in the main office. Check for lost
items in the main office. The lost and found will be cleaned out every 3 months. Items not claimed will be
donated. All items brought to school by students should be clearly labeled so that they can be easily
returned if found on campus. Tassajara Prep is not responsible for lost or stolen items.

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Field Trips
At Tassajara Prep, we believe that teaching and learning extends beyond the four walls of the school.
Dublin, the Tri-Valley, the Bay Area and beyond have a great deal of resources to offer our children in
respect to their learning. A field trip is any planned journey for one or more students away from Tassajara
Prep. Field trips, when used for teaching and learning, provide educationally sound and important
enhancements to the instructional program. Parents are encouraged to suggest people and places worthy
of attention. The Principal or designee approves all field trips.

A Parent/Guardian Permission Form must be completed and signed before any student leaves the school
campus on a trip. Parental permission shall include written consent from parents/guardians authorizing he
supervisors to arrange for necessary medical treatment. Permission received by telephone is not
permitted. If a student does not have written permission, he/she will remain in a supervised
area/classroom at Tassajara Prep until the class returns from the trip.

The teacher/sponsor(s) shall provide parents and guardians with information concerning the purpose and
destination of the trip, transportation, eating arrangements, date and time of departure, estimated time of
return, arrangements for supervision, cost to the student, safety precautions (if high risk activity is
involved), and a detailed itinerary when the field trip will extend beyond the school day. Please refer to
TVLC Policy #500-002 Field Trips and Excursions.

The Walking Field Trip Authorization will suffice for scheduled and unscheduled walking field trips in
the neighborhood.

Chaperones/Drivers
Families are often asked to serve as drivers, chaperones, or supervisors for various field trips. Family
volunteers who desire to act as drivers, chaperones, or supervisors on field trips must be Registered
Volunteers. Only the classroom teacher(s), his/her students, and Registered Volunteer(s) will be allowed
to attend field trips. The role of the Chaperone is to actively supervise students. Children not currently
enrolled at Tassajara Prep are prohibited from participating in Tassajara Prep field trips. No guests or
siblings. NO EXCEPTIONS. Smoking is prohibited on field trips.

Chaperones that will be transporting students to and from field trips and school-sponsored events in their
private vehicle must have on file in the office:

   a completed and approved Driver Application Form
   a complete and current Use of Private Vehicle in Transporting Students Form
   a copy of their valid driver’s license,
   current auto registration
   current proof of insurance (see box for details)

The minimum insurance requirement for field trip driving should include:

   Public Liability/Bodily Injury $100,000/$300,000 per occurrence
   Property Damage $50,000 per occurrence
   Medical Payments $5,000 per occurrence

Safety on Field Trips
Student safety shall be a primary consideration. School staff is responsible for being familiar with and
conducting a safety assessment of the proposed site of the field trip and each trip will be properly

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monitored and supervised. All teachers have been trained in CPR and first aid and are equipped to use
those skills if an emergency arises.

Prior to participating in the field trip, teachers will review with students the conduct standards and
emergency procedures that provide for their safety. Student behavior while on all field trips must comply
with the Student Code of Conduct and all other rules, policies, and procedures of Tassajara Prep. Parents
will be informed of rules and regulations and any consequences of infraction of rules. The signed
permission form will contain a statement of understanding and acceptance of rules by a parent and the
student. Permission notes for any trip will include authorization to obtain emergency medical care and
any pertinent insurance information, such as name of carrier and insurance number.

Students must be in seats, must wear seatbelts, and may not be transported in the back of a pickup or
camper or on the floor of any vehicle. The maximum number of passengers shall not exceed the number
of passengers the vehicle is designed to carry. Children under 13 years of age are not permitted to ride in
the front seat of a vehicle. The vehicle must be mechanically sound and operated in a safe manner.
Students are expected to travel to and from the field trip with the staff responsible for the trip. Student
travel by any other means is discouraged. Students will not be permitted to leave the field trip group
during the trip. The School assumes no liability for students who are for any reason transported by parents
or in private cars. Upon return to school Tassajara Prep requests that you personally check in with the
Main Office and inform them of your safe return to school.

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VIII. Disciplinary Action, Suspensions, and Expulsions
Tassajara Prep follows a ―progressive discipline‖ model that STEPS up with successive policy
infractions. At Tassajara Prep we want to encourage students to model good behavior and understand that
good citizenship is required by all in the Tassajara Prep community. The teacher is the authority figure in
the classroom. All students and parents are expected to respect all Tassajara Prep staff. Depending upon
the specific circumstances surrounding the student’s behavior, a student may remain in the office or other
designated area for a ―time-out‖ period, and an appropriate consequence will be devised. Depending on
the violation, a write-up of the offense may be sent home with the student or a student’s parent or
guardian might be called to immediately pick up the student. Friday PM tutoring may be assigned. Lunch
detentions are another consequence.

Student Court
Students at Tassajara Prep through their leadership and charter petition have the privilege and
responsibility of handling minor infractions through a student court. This court is comprised of justices
elected by the student body to hear cases through the advisory period regarding student conflicts,
disruptions, littering and other minor infractions as deemed by the administration. They meet twice a
month to hear the concerns and make recommendations to the school administration regarding
punishments, including campus beautification, Friday PM tutoring with administration or lunch
detentions. Students have the choice of a student court hearing or proceeding directly to administration
action.

Suspension and Expulsion
In the event that a student’s behavior poses a clear and immediate danger to self and/or others or a student
exhibits severely inappropriate behavior, the Principal or designee, may suspend the student. Depending
upon the circumstances, the suspension may be brought before the TVLC Board of Directors for possible
expulsion. State law prescribes the reasons and procedures for expulsion.

By law, students causing serious physical injury; possessing weapons, dangerous objects or explosives;
selling drugs; committing robbery/extortion; or committing or attempting to commit sexual assault/sexual
battery must be recommended for expulsion unless the principal feels there are extenuating
circumstances, which must be reported the Tassajara Prep Governing Board.
In preparing the lists of enumerated suspension and expulsion offenses and procedures listed below,
TPHS has reviewed the lists of offenses and procedures that apply to students attending non-charter
public schools. TPHS believes their proposed lists of enumerated offenses and procedures provide
adequate safety for students, staff, and visitors to the school and serve the best interests the school’s pupils
and their parents (guardians).

Suspension Events
The following behaviors may result in immediate suspension:

    Causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause physical harm to another person.
    Fighting.
    Forgery.
    Disrupting school activities.
    Defying the valid authority of a teacher, the Principal, or other adult at the school.
    Stealing or attempting to steal school or private property.
    Committing an obscene act or engaging in habitual profanity or vulgarity.

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   Sexual harassment, advances, request for sexual favors, or other verbal, visual, or physical
conduct of a sexual nature.
   Using hate language.
   Violating the Walking Policy or any Field Trip policy.
   Drugs – being in possession of or under the influence.
   Alcohol – being in possession of or under the influence.
   Smoking or being in possession of tobacco products.

Depending on the violation and situation, suspensions will be at home. If a child is suspended, the
parent/guardian will be called and a letter will be sent home with the student stating the violation and
where the suspension is to take place. Regardless of where the suspension is to take place, a student who
receives a suspension notice, will be required to return home for the remainder of the day on which the
violation is made. For an at-home suspension, the student is not to report to school the next day but will
be expected to complete class assignments through an Independent Study Contract designed by the
student’s teacher and/or the Principal, or designee. During a suspension, the student may earn 50% credit.
If a student is suspended from school, they may not participate in any extra-curricular activities for the
suspended school days.

Upon a student’s second suspension in one year, the student will be referred for a Student Success Team
(SST) to devise an intervention plan for the student. The Student Success Team, as described earlier in
this Handbook, reserves the right to refer the student to the TVLC Board of Directors for an expulsion
hearing. Upon a student’s third suspension, the student will be referred to the TVLC Board of Directors
for an expulsion hearing.

Expulsion Events
Students may be suspended or expelled for any of the following acts when it is determined the student:

   Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened to cause physical injury to another person or
willfully used force or violence upon the person of another, except in self-defense.
   Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any firearm, knife, explosive, or other dangerous
object.
   Unlawfully possessed, used, sold or otherwise furnished, or was under the influence of, any
controlled substance as defined in Health and Safety Code 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage,
or intoxicant of any kind.
   Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any controlled substance as defined in
Health and Safety Code 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant of any kind, and then
sold, delivered or otherwise furnished to any person another liquid substance or material and
represented same as controlled substance, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant.
   Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion.
   Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or private property.
   Stole or attempted to steal school property or private property.
   Possessed or used tobacco or any products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including
but not limited to cigars, cigarettes, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco,
snuff, chew packets and betel.
   Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity or vulgarity.
   Unlawfully possessed or unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any drug
paraphernalia, as defined in Health and Safety Code 11014.5

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   Disrupted school activities or otherwise willfully defied the valid authority of supervisors,
teachers, the Principal, or designee, other school officials, or other school personnel engaged
in the performance of their duties.
   Knowingly received stolen school property or private property.
   Possessed an imitation firearm, i.e., a replica of a firearm that is as substantially similar in
physical properties to an existing firearm as to lead a reasonable person to conclude that the
replica is a firearm.
   Committed or attempted to commit a sexual assault as defined in Penal Code 261, 266c, 286,
   288, 288a or 289, or committed a sexual battery as defined in Penal Code 243.4.
   Harassed, threatened, or intimidated a student who is a complaining witness or witness in a
school disciplinary proceeding for the purpose of preventing that student from being a
witness and/or retaliating against that student for being a witness.
   Made terrorist threats against school officials and/or school property.
   Committed sexual harassment.
   Caused, attempted to cause, threatened to cause, or participated in an act of hate violence.
   Intentionally harassed, threatened or intimidated a student or group of students to the extent
of having the actual and reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting class work,
creating substantial disorder, and invading student rights by creating an intimidating or
hostile educational environment.

The above list is not exhaustive and depending upon the offense, a student may be suspended or expelled
for misconduct not specified above. Please refer to TVLC Policy and Procedure #300-003 Student
Suspension and Expulsion.

See Appendix I – Draft Suspension and Expulsion Policies for more information.

Expelled Students/Alternative Education
Students who are expelled shall be responsible for seeking alternative education programs including, but
not limited to, programs within the county or their school district of residence.

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APPENDIX P – JOB DESCRIPTIONS

The following are job descriptions for several key positions supporting Tassajara Preparatory High
School (“TPHS”). Note that, except for the positions of Office Manager and Principal, the jobs are
corporate level positions that support all of the schools run by the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation.

Accounting Manager
The Accounting Manager of the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (TVLC) maintains the financial records
of the corporation. The Accounting Manager will ensure that the corporation’s finances are operated in
fulfillment with the mission as spelled out in the charter(s) and in compliance with California charter
school law, education law, tax law, and labor law. Accounting functions must follow Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles (GAAP), Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), and Not-For-Profit
standards and regulations. The Accounting Manager will provide financial reports to various groups and
individuals, including the TVLC Board, the Chief Operating Officer, the Chartering Entities, and
appropriate school administrators and staff. The Accounting Manager is responsible for the
implementation of procedures and practices that will ensure the ongoing financial viability and long-term
sustainability of the corporation. This position reports to the TVLC Chief Operating Officer and Board of
Directors.

Responsibilities
 Effective asset management and full compliance with reporting and audit requirements under FASB
and the California State Audit Regulations for K-12 and Charter Schools
 Assist with the preparation and implementation of the annual budget
 Assist in developing financial policies and procedures to ensure strong internal controls are in place
 Prepare for submittal all required documents (i.e., 1st and 2nd Interim Budget Reports) to the
regulatory and oversight agencies
 Carry out all functions related to employee benefits, including healthcare, dental, vision, flex
spending accounts, and retirement plans
 Maintain all AR/AP, purchase orders, check issuance, payroll
 Work with auditor/CPA in the preparation of the annual audit and tax return
 Work with principals, employees, consultants, and vendors to manage the day-to-day fiscal
operations
 Maintain data required in the Memoranda of Understanding between TVLC and the Chartering
Entities
 Manage and maintain current contracts with vendors
 Provide brief revenue and expense reports for the monthly newsletters to families
 Provide a monthly budget report to the TVLC Board and the school principals

Qualifications
 Bachelor’s Degree, with an emphasis in accounting, finance, business administration or closely
related field; a CPA or candidate is desirable
 3-5 years financial management experience, knowledge of school finances a plus
 Familiarity with GAAP and FASB
 Excellent computer skills, especially Excel and Word
 Ability to implement and maintain sound financial practices
 Ability to prepare and present financial reports to various stakeholder groups
 Ability to process bills, payroll, revenue, and other fiscal items in an accurate and timely manner

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Chief Operating Officer
The Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (TVLC) oversees the
business operations of the corporation and plays a leading role in executing the corporation’s strategic and
operational plans. The COO will report directly to the TVLC Board and, when appropriate, will be
expected to communicate independently with the chartering entities and the school Principals. The COO
is fully responsible for the implementation of policies, procedures and practices that will ensure the
ongoing financial viability and long-term sustainability of the corporation.
The COO will manage TVLC business operations in fulfillment of the schools’ missions spelled out in
their charters. The COO will ensure that the corporation’s business operations are conducted efficiently
and effectively in compliance with charter school regulations and applicable education law. The COO
will work with the TVLC Board and its committees to ensure that the corporation makes sound strategic
decisions. The COO will serve as a key spokesperson for TVLC with the community, local and state
government agencies, and the charter school movement.
Responsibilities
Financial Oversight:
 Work with and supervise the work of the Accounting Manager to manage the day-to-day fiscal
operations;
 Work with the Principals to manage budgetary compliance and to provide advice on best business
practices;
 Oversee the preparation and implementation of the annual budget;
 Work with the Choice for Children Education Foundation to establish financial goals and
appropriately allocate donated revenue;
 Obtain appropriate lines of credit;
 Oversee preparation and submission of all required financial reports;
 Oversee grant applications and implementation reporting;
 Obtain required financial audits and prepare the response to any audit finding.
Schools Management and Growth:
 Implement the business-relevant aspects of the Memoranda of Understanding between TVLC and
the Chartering Entities;
 Manage the acquisition and maintenance of required educational infrastructure including
computer networks, school furnishings, and office equipment;
 Coordinate with the Principals to monitor attendance and other data and ensure that proper
documentation is submitted;
 Provide input into the strategic planning process of the TVLC Board in support of the vision and
mission of the schools;
 When directed by the Board, coordinate the preparation of charter renewal petitions and the
development of charter petitions for additional schools;
 Create and appoint committees (―COO-appointed committees‖) to assist in the execution of
certain planning and administrative functions;
 Facilitate communication between faculty and business operations staff, between the Principals
and vendors to TVLC, and between TVLC staff and family and community volunteers.
Facilities Management:
 Supervise the management of facilities, including the hiring and supervision of custodial
personnel, the acquisition of repair or other maintenance services, and the provision of utilities;
 Ensure that all safety equipment and procedures are in compliance with applicable regulations;
 Prepare all Proposition 39 requests and correspondence; oversee negotiations with applicable
parties in relation to Proposition 39;
 Serve as the interlocutor with the landlord of any site used by the corporation for its operations
regarding rental payments, site condition, repairs, or other matters that bear on the status and use
of the site;

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   Oversee any efforts to obtain permanent facilities, manage the process of permanent facility
construction or preparation, and oversee operations associated with the initial occupancy of any
such facility.
Human Resources:
 Provide support to the Principals for personnel administration including establishing procedures
for payroll and the provision of benefits;
 Hire, train and manage administrative and operations personnel;
 Participate in the dispute resolution procedure and the grievance procedure when appropriate;
 With the Board and the Principals, prepare and recommend new or revised personnel policies and
procedures.
TVLC Governing Board Support:
 Develop all TVLC Board meeting agendas in compliance with the Brown Act; provide for the
preparation of board meeting minutes;
 Attend all Board meetings;
 Provide comments and recommendations regarding policies presented by others to the TVLC
Board;
 Serve as liaison for legal issues, including coordination with TVLC legal counsel;
 Serve as contact for legislative issues regarding charter school/education issues;
 Attend meetings with the Chartering Entity or designee as required and represent TVLC as
necessary at local public school district board meetings and the board meetings of any chartering
entities;
 Serve as liaison with community groups and government agencies, such as the Livermore Area
Recreation and Parks District, on issues that involve TVLC.
The COO will be given an annual performance review by the TVLC Board.

Qualifications
 Bachelor’s Degree, advanced degree preferred;
 Managerial and Finance Experience (Educational or Non-Profit experience preferred);
 Familiarity with the Charter School Concept and supporting philosophy;
 Familiarity with the Education Code and relevant public law;
 Excellent business operations skills, including financial management, personnel administration,
vendor relations, and regulatory compliance;
 Community-building skills relevant to varied interest groups in a public school environment;
 A record of success in project management, preferably in a school environment;
 A willingness to commit time and energy to sustain an evolving school community;
 An ability to act as corporate spokesperson.

Development Director
Reporting to and in partnership with the Chief Operating Office (COO), the Development Director
(Director) will spearhead development efforts as Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (TVLC) continues to
grow. A new position in the organization, the Director will have the opportunity to build the development
function.

Responsibilities
 Researching and writing grants for TVLC and its schools
 Developing/executing TVLC’s fundraising plan
 Helping to secure financial support from government, individuals, foundations and corporations
 Managing the data entry and gift processing for TVLC
 Developing and maintaining ongoing relationships with major donors and constituents
 Overseeing the organization of special events

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   Developing and tracking proposals and reports for all foundation, government and corporate
fundraising
   Coordinating fundraising efforts between multiple in-house organizations

Qualifications
 BA (required), MA (a plus)
 Demonstrated excellence in organizational, managerial, and communication skills

General Counsel
Under direction of the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (TVLC) Board of Directors and Chief Operations
Officer, provides professional legal counsel to the TVLC Board and charter school administration.

Responsibilities
 Prepares and renders legal opinions to the TVLC Board and administrative staff as requested
 Prepares and represents the TVLC Board at administrative law hearings and judicial proceedings
 Attends and provides legal advice at meetings of the TVLC Board, and such other meetings as the
Board President directs
 Provides legal assistance in the drafting of legal documents, Board policy, rules and regulations,
resolutions, applications of diverse kinds and other legal or related papers upon request
 Drafts contracts deeds, leases, ordinances, resolutions, rules, regulations, and other legal documents
 Keeps abreast of legislation, provides legal assistance in the drafting of state legislation, serves as
liaison with legislative advocates, and represents the TVLC Board as an advocate before the
legislature in such matters as directed by the Board
 Represents the TVLC Board at state and county workshops and seminars relating to school legal
services and participates in in-service education programs with school staff to limit exposure to
liability
 Advises staff concerning student suspension and expulsion, special attendance permits, and other
students’ rights
 Conducts legal research and prepares reports of various topics as requested by the TVLC Board
 Attends various negotiating sessions, grievance hearings, administrative hearings, arbitration or
appeals and provides legal advice and counsel
 Reviews TVLC contracts as requested
 Coordinates legal matters with outside counsel
 Monitors legal services provided to TVLC by outside counsel, prepares pleadings, and handles
depositions, interrogatories, pretrial motions, pretrial and settlement conferences, studies and
interprets laws, court decisions, ordinances and other legal authorities
 Develops and conducts staff training sessions and workshops.

Qualifications
 Any combination of experience and training that would provide the required knowledge and
abilities
 A Juris Doctorate from an accredited law school
 License to practice law in the State of California with preferred experience in educational
administration and/or school and labor laws, industrial relations, public administration and business
administration and increasingly responsible experience in educational administration.
 Knowledge of legal principles and practices, including civil, criminal, constitutional, contract,
employment, administrative and business law and procedures
 Knowledge of methods, procedures and practices used in the conduct of civil litigation
 Knowledge of judicial procedures and rules of evidence
 Knowledge of California Education Code, Administrative Codes, and Government Codes

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     Knowledge of pertinent Federal, State, and local laws, codes, regulations and court decisions
relating to education
     Knowledge of methods of legal research
     Knowledge of evaluation of practical consequences of legal strategies.
     Skill in interpreting applicable federal and state laws and TVLC policies and procedures
     Skill in conducting information and organizing material into manageable form
     Skill in applying data collected to resolve problems
     Skill in formulating recommendations, proposals and counter proposals
     Skill in preparing and presenting effective written and oral reports, recommendations, district
policies and procedures
     Ability to develop, maintain and coordinate effective relationships with members of the Board of
Education, Personnel Commission, management and employee organizations
     Skill in analyzing relationships among complex data and/or employee groups
     Ability to select, supervise, train and evaluate staff.
     Possession of a valid California driver’s license and/or be able to provide own transportation in
conduct of work assignments
     Willingness to travel as needed.

IT Director
The IT Director will be responsible for configuring, troubleshooting, and managing our network and
security infrastructure. This requires an individual with a wide range of skills including but not limited to:
systems administration for Windows, network administration, firewall management, email infrastructure,
hardware specification, hardware installation, software installation\upgrade, and troubleshooting.

Responsibilities
 Support 150 staff members, 1200 students and 700-1000 desktop/laptop computers
 Oversee all technology infrastructure for multiple schools (phones, servers, laptops, software, etc.)
 Research, recommend, and obtain quotes for new technology purchases
 Install and perform upgrades as necessary
 Assist COO and Development Director in technology grant proposal writing.

Qualifications
 Experience in Information Technologies and Computer & Network support both onsite / in person
and remotely via phone
 Broad knowledge of Windows desktop operating systems, MS Office Suites 2003 — 2010, Active
Directory, security permissions, Exchange 2007, IPsec VPN services
 Practical hands-on experience with networking devices (switches, firewalls, routers, wireless) and
mobile devices
 Experience with backup hardware & software and firewall configurations
 Thorough understanding of DHCP, DNS, TCP/IP, MS IIS, VPN, VLANs, Outlook Web Access, and
Google Email
 Experience with the creation and updating of documentation and technical writing, for instructional
purposes
 Outstanding interpersonal skills, including the ability to communicate effectively with employees at
all levels
 A proven ability to perform quality work against deadlines
 Willingness to work after hours and/or on weekends as required
 A team player who is willing to take direction as well as work on issues and projects on their own

Extra points for:

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   Experience with VMware and Microsoft Hyper-V Server
   Experience with Fortinet Firewall
   Experience with PowerSchool student information system
   Experience with School Loop communication portal
   Experience with HP switching and HP wireless controller\AP
   Computer imaging and deployment technology experience
   Symantec or other antivirus software, malware/spyware removal experience
   End user classroom style software and hardware training
   Asset management and software licensing experience

Office Manager
The Office Manager is responsible for overall operations of the school site. Reports to Principal and
COO. Works closely with all levels within the school and the central office as well as with children,
parents and outside consultants/vendors. Upholds the mission and values established by the Tri-Valley
Learning Corporation.

Responsibilities:
 Manage all aspects of attendance (set up and maintain student database and attendance records, etc.)
 Act as central point of contact for the school by answering phones, greeting and directing visitors,
addressing questions from parents and nurturing students
 Provide administrative support for the Principal and COO, to include managing correspondence,
scheduling meetings, ordering supplies, and developing necessary communications internally and
externally
 Maintain school/student records and organize files
 Manage confidential information appropriately
 Attend to students’ medical needs
 Organize free/reduced lunch program; receive lunch payments from students
 Handle travel schedules and juggle multiple tasks and priorities
 Supervise part-time office assistant: train, develop and appraise effectively (set expectations and
provide direction as needed, follow up and provide feedback in a timely manner); take corrective
action as necessary on a timely basis and in accordance with company policy; consult with Human
Resources as appropriate
 Demonstrate knowledge of, and support, the school mission, vision, value statements, standards,
policies and procedures, operating instructions, confidentiality standards, and code of ethical behavior
 Obtain and maintain Statewide Student Identifiers (SSIDs) for all enrolling and exiting students, meet
CALPADS reporting and certification requirements, maintain and report student, teacher, and course
data directly to CALPADS, report aggregate data to the CBEDS-OPUS internet application
 Perform other related duties as required and assigned.

Qualifications:
 Strong organizational, time management and multi-tasking skills
 Strong interpersonal and communication skills
 Expedience in office management capacity
 Ability to work independently as well as with a team
 Professional appearance and manner
 Fluency in Spanish a huge plus!!!
 Minimum educational level: A.A. Degree
 Minimum 3 plus years experience in fast-paced, ever-changing administrative support position;
experience in school front office preferable
 Proficiency with Microsoft Office

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   Some supervisory experience preferred

Principal
The Principal of Tassajara Preparatory High School (TPHS) supervises the campus teachers and non-
instructional staff. The Principal shall act as the instructional leader at TPHS and shall be responsible for
helping TPHS students achieve outcomes as outlined in the Educational Program. The Principal will
communicate directly with the TVLC Board of Directors and its staff, and to the Chartering Entity Board
of Education through its Superintendent or designee. The Principal is fully responsible for all the
administrative aspects of TPHS.

General Responsibilities:
 Establish a Communication Model to facilitate communication among all the groups within TPHS,
between TPHS and the Chartering Entity, and between TPHS and the community at large.
 Coordinate the activities and operating bodies at TPHS.
 Supervise all employees and volunteers at TPHS.
 Administer the working budget in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
 Implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the School and the Chartering
Entity, along with other MOUs as required.
 Establish and execute enrollment procedures.
 Oversee all parent/student/teacher relations.
 Stay abreast of School laws and legislation.
 Pursue/oversee/submit available grant offerings applicable to TPHS.
 Create and appoint committees to assist in the execution of certain planning and administrative
functions (known as “Director appointed committees”).
 Implement Site Safety Procedures in compliance with all applicable laws.

TVLC Board & Chartering Entity Responsibilities:
 Attend all TVLC Board of Directors meetings & TPHS Site Board Meetings.
 Attend meetings with the Charting Entity or designee as determined by a Memorandum of
Understanding and attend as necessary Board of Directors meetings of the Charting Entity as a
charter representative.
 Provide a monthly report to the TVLC Board & TPHS Site Board.
 Propose policies for adoption by the TPHS Site Board.
 Provide comments and recommendations regarding policies presented by others to the TPHS Site
Board & TVLC Board.
 Establish procedures designed to carry out TPHS Site Board & TVLC Board policies.

HR Responsibilities:
 Appoint, with TVLC Board approval, a Hiring Committee for faculty hiring that includes TPHS
Site Board, Faculty, and parent representation.
 Participate on Hiring Committee and present written recommendations to the TVLC Board for final
approval.
 Draft interview questions to be used by the Hiring Committees in conjunction with Hiring
Committee members.
 Provide timely performance evaluations of all TPHS employees at least bi-annually.
 Participate in the dispute resolution procedure and the complaint procedure when necessary.

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                              August 1, 2011
   Terminate TPHS employees in accordance with established policies and procedures.

Student & Education Program Responsibilities:
• Oversee development and implementation of curriculum in alignment with State of California
Standards.
• Develop the TPHS annual performance target goals.
• Coordinate the administration of Standardized Testing.
• Oversee the implementation of “Backward Design” methods to ensure academic success across the
school phase.
• Oversee the recommendation and implementation of Individualized Education Plans (IEP) and
attend said IEP meetings upon the request of any involved party.
• Handle TPHS student disciplinary matters in accordance with TPHS policies and procedures.
• Plan and coordinate student orientation.
• Facilitate open house events.

The above duties may be delegated or contracted as approved by the TVLC Board to a business
administrator of the School or other employee, a parent volunteer (only in accordance with student and
teacher confidentiality rights) or to the County Office or a third-party provider.

Qualifications
 Experience teaching in Middle or High school levels
 Excellent communication and community-building skills
 Strong record of innovative leadership through collaboration and team work
 Administrative experience
 Extensive knowledge of curriculum development
 A record of success in developing teachers
 Experience in performance assessment
 Valid California Administrative Credential
 Valid California Teaching Credential
 Possession of a Master’s Degree or higher

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                                          August 1, 2011
APPENDIX Q – TRI-VALLEY LEARNING CORPORATION
ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

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Tassajara Preparatory High School              August 1, 2011
APPENDIX R – FISCAL PLAN

Revenue Projections & Assumptions

Five Year Budget Projections

Cash Flow Projections – 3 Year

Staffing Cost Detail

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Tassajara Preparatory High School                                    August 1, 2011
Tri-Valley Learning Corporation – TPHS Multi-Year Revenue Forecast

2009-10          2010-11        2011-12        2012-13      2013-14      2014-15      2015-16       2016-17
COLA – SSC Dartboard                                    4.25%            -0.39%          2.24%          3.10%       2.80%        3.20%        3.00%         3.00%
COLA (net of deficit) – utilized here                   0.00%            -0.39%          2.24%          3.10%       2.80%        3.20%        3.00%         3.00%

Enrollment Projection
9-12                                                      0                  0           0            216          432          648          864           864

ADA
9-12                                                    0.00             0.00          0.00         204.12       408.24       612.36       816.48        816.48

Ratio of ADA/Enrollment
9-12                                                 94.50%         94.50%         94.50%          94.50%       94.50%       94.50%       94.50%        94.50%

BRL per ADA
9-12                                             $5,845.00         $5,822.20      $6,148.00      $6,338.59    $6,516.07    $6,724.58    $6,926.32     $7,134.11

Total Entitlement
9-12                                                                     $0             $0     $1,293,833   $2,660,120   $4,117,865    $5,655,202   $5,824,858

Categorical Block Grant                                $410.00          $410.00        $410.00        $410.00      $410.00      $410.00      $410.00      $410.00
9-12                      $410.00                             $        –    $         –    $    83,689.20 $ 167,378.40 $ 251,067.60 $ 334,756.80 $ 334,756.80
Supplemental CBG              $159.00                                                                 $32,455      $64,910      $97,365     $129,820     $129,820

Lottery     TPHS
Unrestricted                      $111.50                                   $0            $0        $22,759      $45,519      $68,278       $91,038      $91,038
Restricted                        $17.00                                    $0            $0         $3,470       $6,940      $10,410       $13,880      $13,880

El Dorado Selpa                                                                                      $83,938     $222,792     $334,187     $474,981      $474,981
Implementation Grant                                                                 $175,000       $100,000     $100,000
Interest                                                                                   $0         $4,500      $14,000      $21,000       $36,000      $41,000

Total TPHS                                                                           $175,000      $1,624,644   $3,281,659   $4,900,174   $6,735,678    $6,910,334

ASSUMPTIONS
Enrollment Used projection/assumption for enrollment based on petition information and community feedback

ADA            Includes listed assumption for ADA rate projection in each year

BRL            Includes current ssc assumption for BRL

Projections Utilizied SSC projections for all inputs. (Updated 7/14/2011)
Primary Sort Element
TVLC – TPHS Multi-Year Budget Summary
Fund: 01 – General Fund

Account Code                                                                 Description                                                    2012-2013            2013-2014               2014-2015            2015-2016            2016-2017

1100-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Teachers Salaries-Instruction                                                                                        $      522,500.00    $     1,092,025.00      $     1,680,000.00   $     2,319,900.00   $     2,423,500.00
1103-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Teachers Salaries-Substitute Pay-Instruction                                                                         $         7,000.00   $        20,000.00      $        28,000.00   $        39,000.00   $        40,000.00
1300-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   Certificated Supervisors and Administrators Salaries-School Administration                                           $      115,000.00    $       190,000.00      $       195,175.00   $       203,957.88   $       213,135.98
2300-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000   Classified Supervisors and Administrators Salaries-School Administration                                             $       50,500.00    $        52,772.50      $        55,147.26   $        57,628.89   $        60,222.19
2300-01-7300-001-0000-0-0000   Classified -Fiscal Services                                                                                          $       20,000.00    $        20,900.00      $        21,840.50   $        22,823.32   $        23,850.37
1900-01-7100-001-0000-0-0000   Other Certificated Salaries-Counselor                                                                                $       55,000.00    $       120,000.00      $       186,000.00   $       256,000.00   $       260,000.00
2200-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   Classified Support Salaries-Plant Maintenance and Operations Custodial & Yard Supervision/PE Aide                    $       55,000.00    $        82,163.00      $       140,000.00   $       170,000.00   $       177,650.00
2200-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   Classified Support Salaries-Plant Maintenance and Operations Custodial & Yard Supervision Subs                       $         1,500.00   $         5,400.00      $        10,000.00   $        12,000.00   $        14,000.00
2400-01-2420-001-0000-0-1110   Librarians                                                                                                           $       30,000.00    $        31,350.00      $        32,760.75   $        34,234.98   $        35,775.56
2400-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   Clerical, Technical, and Office Staff Salaries-School Administration                                                 $       27,500.00    $        57,887.00      $        60,491.92   $        63,214.05   $        66,058.68
3101-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   State Teachers Retirement System, certificated positions-Instruction                                                 $       43,106.00    $        90,092.00      $       138,600.00   $       191,392.00   $       199,938.00
3101-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   State Teachers Retirement System, certificated positions-Instruction Subs                                            $          783.00    $         1,650.00      $         2,310.00   $         3,217.00   $         3,382.00
3101-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   State Teachers Retirement System, certificated positions-School Administration                                       $         9,487.00   $        15,854.00      $        16,102.00   $        16,826.59   $        17,583.79
3301-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, certificated positions-Instruction                                                       $         7,526.00   $        15,834.00      $        24,360.00   $        33,638.00   $        35,140.00
3301-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, certificated positions-Instruction Subs                                                  $          137.75    $           290.00      $           406.00   $          565.00    $          594.00
3301-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, certificated positions-School Administration                                             $         1,667.00   $         2,786.00      $         2,830.00   $         2,903.00   $         2,929.00
3302-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, classified positions-School Administration                                               $         1,705.00   $         1,953.00      $         3,224.00   $         3,352.00   $         3,588.00
3302-01-7100-001-0000-0-0000   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, Other Certificated Salaries-Counselor                                                    $          377.00    $           754.00      $           823.00   $          860.00    $          899.00
3302-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Custodial & Yard Supervision       $         3,441.00   $         4,224.00      $         4,664.00   $         5,094.00   $         5,323.00
3302-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Subs                               $          101.00    $           155.00      $           823.00   $          860.00    $          899.00
3302-01-2420-001-0000-0-0000   OASDI/Medicare/Alternative, classified positions-Librarians                                                          $         2,295.00   $         2,398.28      $         2,506.20   $         2,618.98   $         2,736.83
3401-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Health & Welfare Benefits, certificated positions-Instruction                                                        $       31,504.00    $        66,509.00      $        98,014.00   $       129,519.00   $       138,750.00
3402-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000   Health & Welafre Benefits – classified positions-School Administration                                               $         3,500.00   $         7,002.00      $         9,304.00   $        10,048.32   $        10,852.19
3402-01-7300-001-0000-0-0000   Health & Welfare Benefits, classified positions-Fiscal Services                                                      $         1,800.00   $         2,093.00      $         4,185.00   $         4,519.80   $         4,881.38
3401-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   Health & Welfare Benefits, certificated positions-School Administration                                              $         1,200.00   $         1,254.00      $         1,310.43   $         1,369.40   $         1,431.02
3402-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   Health & Welfare Benefits, classified positions-School Administration                                                $         1,200.00   $         1,254.00      $         1,310.43   $         1,369.40   $         1,431.02
3402-01-7100-001-0000-0-0000   Health & Welfare Benefits, Other Certificated Salaries-Counselor                                                     $         3,500.00   $         7,702.00      $        11,938.00   $        16,597.00   $        18,007.00
3402-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   Health & Welfare Benefits, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Custodial & Yard Supervision        $         3,501.00   $        12,531.00      $        16,767.00   $        21,426.00   $        26,551.00
3501-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   State Unemployment Insurance, certificated positions-Instruction                                                     $         4,340.00   $         8,246.00      $        12,152.00   $        16,058.00   $        16,058.00
3501-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   State Unemployment Insurance, certificated positions-Instruction Subs                                                $          434.00    $           434.00      $           434.00   $          434.00    $          434.00
3501-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   State Unemployment Insurance, certificated positions-School Administration                                           $          434.00    $           868.00      $           868.00   $          868.00    $          868.00
3502-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   State Unemployment Insurance, classified positions-School Administration                                             $          434.00    $           434.00      $           434.00   $          434.00    $          434.00
3502-01-7100-001-0000-0-0000   State Unemployment Insurance, Other Certificated Salaries-Counselor                                                  $          434.00    $           868.00      $         1,302.00   $         1,736.00   $         1,736.00
3502-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   State Unemployment Insurance, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Custodial & Yard Supervision     $          434.00    $         1,302.00      $         1,736.00   $         2,170.00   $         2,604.00
3502-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   State Unemployment Insurance, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Subs                             $          434.00    $           434.00      $           434.00   $          434.00    $          434.00
3502-01-2420-001-0000-0-0000   State Unemployment Insurance, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Subs                             $          434.00    $           434.00      $           434.00   $          434.00    $          434.00
3601-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Workers Compensation Insurance, certificated positions-Instruction                                                   $       15,675.00    $        32,760.00      $        50,400.00   $        69,597.00   $        72,705.00
3601-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Workers Compensation Insurance, certificated positions-Instruction Subs                                              $          210.00    $           420.00      $         1,703.00   $         1,780.00   $         1,860.00
3601-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   Workers Compensation Insurance, certificated positions-School Administration                                         $         3,450.00   $         5,765.00      $         5,855.00   $         5,910.00   $         6,060.00
3602-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   Workers Compensation Insurance, classified positions-School Administration                                           $          825.00    $           945.00      $         1,703.00   $         1,780.00   $         1,860.00
3602-01-7100-001-0000-0-0000   Workers Compensation Insurance, Other Certificated Salaries-Counselor                                                $         1,560.00   $         3,600.00      $         5,580.00   $         7,680.00   $         7,800.00
3602-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   Workers Compensation Insurance, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Custodial & Yard Supervision   $         1,650.00   $         3,810.00      $         6,168.00   $         8,632.00   $        11,206.00
3602-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   Workers Compensation Insurance, classified positions-Plant Maintenance and Operations Subs                           $           45.00    $               75.00   $         1,703.00   $         1,780.00   $         1,860.00
3602-01-2420-001-0000-0-0000   Workers Compensation Insurance, classified positions-Librarians                                                      $          900.00    $           940.50      $           982.82   $         1,027.05   $         1,073.27
4100-01-1000-001-6300-0-1110   Approved Textbooks and Core Curricula Materials-Instruction                                                          $         3,470.00   $         6,940.00      $        10,410.00   $        13,880.00   $        13,880.00
4110-01-1000-001-1100-0-1110   Approved Textbooks and Core Curricula Materials-Instruction                                                          $       22,759.00    $        45,519.00      $        68,278.00   $        91,038.00   $        91,038.00
4110-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Materials -Instruction                                                                                               $      100,000.00    $       120,000.00      $       190,000.00   $       180,000.00   $       160,000.00
4300-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Materials and Supplies-Instruction                                                                                   $      105,000.00    $       125,000.00      $       195,000.00   $       210,000.00   $       125,000.00
4300-01-2700-001-0000-0-1110   Materials and Supplies-School Administration                                                                         $         3,000.00   $         6,000.00      $         7,500.00   $         7,500.00   $         8,200.00
4300-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000   Materials and Supplies-Plant Maintenance and Operations                                                              $       13,500.00    $        15,500.00      $        18,500.00   $        19,500.00   $        20,000.00
5200-01-1000-001-0000-0-1110   Travel and Conferences-Instruction                                                                                   $         7,000.00   $        10,000.00      $        12,000.00   $        16,000.00   $        20,000.00
5400-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000   Insurance-Other General Administration                                                                               $       34,500.00    $        46,000.00      $        65,000.00   $        77,301.00   $        83,485.00
Account Code                                                                           Description                                                      2012-2013            2013-2014               2014-2015               2015-2016            2016-2017
5500-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000              Operations and Housekeeping Services-Plant Maintenance and Operations (Athletic & Academic EC Included)                $       31,000.00    $        46,789.00      $        63,000.00      $        75,000.00   $        85,000.00
5600-01-8100-001-0000-0-0000              Rentals, Leases, Repairs, and Noncapitalized Improvements-Plant Maintenance and Operations                             $      145,000.00    $       165,000.00      $       450,000.00      $     1,050,000.00   $     1,200,000.00
5800-01-7191-001-0000-0-0000              Professional/Consulting Services and Operating Expenditures-                                                           $       35,000.00    $        42,000.00      $       100,000.00      $       110,000.00   $       110,000.00
5800-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000              Professional/Consulting Services and Operating Expenditures-Other General Administration                               $       18,000.00    $        20,000.00      $        22,000.00      $        24,000.00   $        26,000.00
5854-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000              Other Consultants/Service Providers-Other General Administration                                                       $       16,000.00    $        20,000.00      $        26,000.00      $        28,000.00   $        30,000.00
5857-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000              Payroll Fees-Other General Administration                                                                              $         2,500.00   $         3,000.00      $         4,000.00      $         5,000.00   $         5,000.00
5910-01-7700-001-0000-0-0000              Internet Connectivity, Website Fees-                                                                                   $         1,800.00   $         6,000.00      $         8,000.00      $         9,000.00   $        15,000.00
5911-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000              -Other General Administration                                                                                          $         7,200.00   $        10,800.00      $        14,400.00      $        14,976.00   $        14,976.00
5915-01-7200-001-0000-0-0000              Postage and Delivery-Other General Administration                                                                      $         2,000.00   $         2,500.00      $         3,000.00      $         4,000.00   $         5,000.00
1100-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              Teachers – Spl Ed                                                                                                      $       55,000.00    $       114,950.00      $       171,950.00      $       228,950.00   $       239,252.00
1101-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              Teachers Sub – Spl ED                                                                                                  $         1,000.00   $         2,000.00      $         3,000.00      $         4,000.00   $         4,500.00
2100-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              Instructional Aide Spl ED                                                                                              $       50,000.00    $        52,250.00      $        76,450.00      $       109,210.00   $       114,124.00
2103-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              Instructional Aide Subs Spl ED                                                                                         $         2,000.00   $         2,000.00      $         3,000.00      $         4,000.00   $         4,500.00
3101-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              STRS – certificated Spl Ed                                                                                             $         4,537.00   $         9,483.00      $        14,186.00      $        18,888.00   $        19,738.00
3901-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              Other Benefits Pension Spl ED                                                                                          $         2,500.00   $         2,612.00      $         4,400.00      $         4,500.00   $         4,600.00
3301-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              OASDI/Medicare – Teachers Spl Ed                                                                                       $          870.00    $           909.00      $           950.00      $          992.00    $         1,037.00
3301-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              OASDI/Medicare – Teachers Subs                                                                                         $           62.00    $               64.00   $               67.00   $            70.00   $            73.00
3302-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              OASDI/Medicare – Instructional Aide                                                                                    $         3,100.00   $         3,239.00      $         3,385.00      $         3,538.00   $         3,697.00
3302-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              OASDI/Medicare – Instructional Aide Subs                                                                               $           62.00    $               64.00   $               67.00   $            70.00   $            73.00
3401-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              Health & Welfare Benefits – Teachers Spl ED                                                                            $         3,500.00   $         7,002.00      $        10,503.00      $        14,004.00   $        14,634.00
3402-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              Health & Welfare Benefits- Instructional Aide Spl ED                                                                   $         7,001.00   $         7,702.00      $        10,503.00      $        14,004.00   $        14,634.00
3501-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              SUI- Teachers Spl ED                                                                                                   $          434.00    $           868.00      $         1,302.00      $         1,736.00   $         1,736.00
3501-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              SUI- Teachers Subs Spl Ed                                                                                              $           34.00    $               34.00   $               34.00   $            34.00   $            34.00
3502-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              SUI- Instructional Aide Spl Ed                                                                                         $          434.00    $           868.00      $         1,302.00      $         1,736.00   $         1,736.00
3502-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              SUI- Instructional Aide Subs Spl Ed                                                                                    $           34.00    $               34.00   $               34.00   $            34.00   $            34.00
3601-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              WC- Teachers                                                                                                           $         1,650.00   $         3,340.00      $         4,950.00      $         6,620.00   $         6,917.00
3601-01-1100-001-6500-0-5001              WC- Teachers Subs                                                                                                      $           30.00    $               31.00   $               33.00   $            35.00   $            37.00
3602-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              WC- Instructional Aide                                                                                                 $         1,500.00   $         1,567.00      $         2,215.00      $         3,275.00   $         3,422.00
3602-01-1130-001-6500-0-5001              WC- Instructional Aide Subs                                                                                            $           30.00    $               31.00   $               33.00   $            35.00   $            37.00
4300-01-1120-001-6500-0-5001              Supplies                                                                                                               $         4,100.00   $         6,200.00      $         8,400.00      $         8,400.00   $         8,400.00
4325-01-1120-001-6500-0-5001              Spl Ed set up costs-emergency only                                                                                     $         2,500.00   $                 –     $                 –     $               –    $               –
5800-01-1120-001-6500-0-5001              Consultants and Services-as enrollment increases funds in case needed                                                  $               –    $        25,000.00      $        50,000.00      $        50,000.00   $        50,000.00
7281-01-9200-001-0000-0-0000              -Transfers Between Agencies-1% Oversight Fee                                                                           $       18,000.00    $        31,000.00      $        47,000.00      $        65,000.00   $        67,000.00

Subtotal – Expenses                                                                                                                                              $     1,738,630.75   $     2,930,464.28      $     4,511,633.31      $     6,220,014.66   $     6,489,329.28

8015-01-0000-001-0000-0-0000              Charter Schools General Purpose Entitlement – State Aid                                                                $     1,293,833.00   $     2,660,120.00      $     4,117,865.00      $     5,655,202.00   $     5,824,858.00
8434-01-0000-001-1300-0-0000              Class Size Reduction, Grade 9                                                                                          $               –    $                 –     $                 –     $               –    $               –
8480-01-0000-001-0000-0-0000              Charter Schools Categorical Block Grant                                                                                $      116,144.00    $       232,288.00      $       348,432.00      $       464,577.00   $       464,577.00
8560-01-0000-001-1100-0-0000              State Lottery Revenue                                                                                                  $       22,759.00    $        45,519.00      $        68,278.00      $        91,038.00   $        91,038.00
8560-01-0000-001-6300-0-0000              State Lottery Revenue                                                                                                  $         3,470.00   $         6,940.00      $        10,410.00      $        13,880.00   $        13,880.00
4610 -01-0000-001-0000-0-0000             Implementation Grant                                                                                                   $      275,000.00    $       100,000.00      $                 –     $               –    $               –
8980-01-0000-001-0000-0-0000              Contribution from Unrestricted to Special Education                                                                    $       63,019.00    $        64,594.48      $        66,209.34      $        67,864.57   $        69,561.18
8980-01-0000-001-6500-0-5001              Contribution to Special Education from Unrestricted                                                                    $       (63,019.00) $        (64,594.48) $           (66,209.34) $           (67,864.57) $        (69,561.18)
8660-01-0000-001-0000-0-0000              Interest                                                                                                               $         4,500.00   $        14,000.00      $        21,000.00      $        36,000.00   $        41,000.00
8792-01-0000-001-6500-0-5001              Transfers from county offices-El Dorado SELPA                                                                          $       83,938.00    $       222,792.00      $       334,188.00      $       474,981.00   $       474,981.00
Subtotal – Revenue                                                                                                                                               $     1,799,644.00   $     3,281,659.00      $     4,900,173.00      $     6,735,678.00   $     6,910,334.00

Total                                                                                                                                                            $       61,013.25    $       351,194.72      $       388,539.69      $       515,663.34   $       421,004.72

Assumptions-
Where appropriate, CPI increases were used.
Salaries increase by 4.5% annually, as well as for any increases in staffing due to enrollment projections.
$458 in funding per student for Special Education Costs.

4% Reserve   $       56,399.08    $       115,696.32      $       178,651.88      $       244,791.16   $       251,577.40

Total Ending Fund Balance $       61,013.25    $       412,207.97      $       800,747.66      $     1,316,411.00   $     1,737,415.72
TPHS Staff Budget Year 1

Yearly actual     Yearly Fica    OASDI+MC      SUI          WC              ETT        Yearly Tax    Yearly actual Yearly actual Total Benefits     STRS              Pension      Total
SALARY            0.062          0.0145        0.062        0.03            0.001                    Dental        VSP                              0.0825            0.05         Compensation
Employer      Employer

Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,537.50                           65,926.52
Teacher                               27,500.00                      398.75        434.00        825.00         7.00      1,664.75           –             –                  –          2,268.75                           31,433.50

Total                               522,500.00             –        7,576.25     4,340.00     15,675.00        70.00     27,661.25       6,875.28     1,123.20          31,504.68       43,106.25            –             624,772.18

Counseling                            55,000.00                      797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      2,888.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        4,290.00                           65,679.02

Principal                           115,000.00                      1,667.50       238.00      3,450.00         7.00      5,362.50        763.92        124.80           3,500.52        9,487.50                          133,350.52
Other – Flex                                  0                                                                                                                                                                                      0

Teachers Subs                          9,500.00                      137.75        434.00          285.00       7.00        863.75            –            –                  –              783.75                         11,147.50

Office – Clerical                     27,500.00       1,705.00       398.75        434.00          825.00       7.00      3,369.75       1,394.04       193.20           1,587.24               –       1,375.00            33,831.99
Librarian                             30,000.00       1,860.00       435.00        434.00          900.00       7.00      3,636.00       1,394.04       193.20           1,587.24               –       1,500.00            36,723.24

Custodial/Yard Duty & PE Aide         55,000.00       3,410.00       797.50        434.00      1,650.00         7.00      6,298.50        763.92        124.80           1,854.52               –       2,750.00            65,903.02
Subs                                   1,500.00          93.00        21.75         51.00         45.00         1.50        212.25           –             –                  –                 –          75.00             1,787.25
TPHS Staff Budget Y2

Yearly actual    Yearly Fica    OASDI+MC      SUI          WC            ETT        Yearly Tax    Total Benefits     STRS           Pension      Total
SALARY           0.062          0.0145        0.062        0.03          0.001                                       0.0825         0.05         Compensation

Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85
Teacher                              57,475.00                      833.39       434.00       1,724.25       7.00      2,998.64           3,500.52       4,741.69                         68,715.85

Total                             1,092,025.00            –       15,834.36     8,246.00     32,760.75     133.00     56,974.11          66,509.88      90,092.06          –           1,305,601.06

Counseling                           60,000.00                      870.00       434.00       1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52       4,950.00                         71,561.52
Counseling                           60,000.00                      870.00       434.00       1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52       4,950.00                         71,561.52

Principal                           118,000.00                     1,711.00      434.00       3,540.00       7.00      5,692.00           3,500.52       9,735.00                        136,927.52
Vice Principal                       72,000.00                     1,044.00      434.00       2,160.00       7.00      3,645.00           3,500.52       5,940.00                         85,085.52
Other – Flex

Teachers Subs                        20,000.00                      290.00       434.00         600.00       7.00      1,331.00                –         1,650.00                         22,981.00
Librarian                            31,350.00       1,943.70       454.58       434.00         940.50       7.00      3,779.78           1,587.24            –       1,567.50            38,284.52
Office – Clerical                    57,887.00       3,588.99       839.36       434.00       1,736.61       7.00      6,605.97           1,587.24            –       2,894.35            68,974.56

Custodial/Yard Duty & PE Aide        82,163.00       5,094.11      1,191.36      434.00       2,464.89       7.00      9,191.36           1,854.52            –       4,108.15            97,317.03
Subs                                  5,400.00         334.80         78.30      183.60         162.00       5.40        764.10                –              –         270.00             6,434.10
TPHS Staff Budget Y3

Yearly actual     Yearly Fica     OASDI+MC      SUI              WC                ETT        Yearly Tax    Total Benefits     STRS            Pension      Total
SALARY            0.062           0.0145        0.034            0.03              0.001                                       0.0825          0.05         Compensation

Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52
Teacher                               60,000.00                       870.00            434.00          1,800.00       7.00      3,111.00           3,500.52        4,950.00                          71,561.52

Counseling                            62,000.00                       899.00            434.00          1,860.00       7.00      3,200.00           3,500.52        5,115.00                          73,815.52
Counseling                            62,000.00                       899.00            434.00          1,860.00       7.00      3,200.00           3,500.52        5,115.00                          73,815.52
Counseling                            62,000.00                       899.00            434.00          1,860.00       7.00      3,200.00           3,500.52        5,115.00                          73,815.52

Total                              1,680,000.00             –       24,360.00     12,152.00        50,400.00         196.00     87,108.00          98,014.56      138,600.00          –            2,003,722.56

Principal                            120,175.00                      1,742.54           434.00          3,605.25       7.00      5,788.79           3,500.52        9,914.44                         139,378.75
Vice Principal                        75,000.00                      1,087.50           434.00          2,250.00       7.00      3,778.50           3,500.52        6,187.50                          88,466.52
Other – Flex

Teachers Subs                         28,000.00                       406.00            434.00            840.00       7.00      1,687.00                –          2,310.00                          31,997.00
Librarian                             32,760.00        2,031.12       475.02            434.00            982.80       7.00      3,929.94           1,587.24             –       1,638.00             39,915.18
Office – Clerical                     60,491.00        3,750.44       877.12            434.00          1,814.73       7.00      6,883.29           1,587.24             –       3,024.55             71,986.08

Custodial/Yard Duty & PE Aide        140,000.00        6,324.00      2,030.00           434.00          4,200.00       7.00     12,995.00           1,854.52             –       7,000.00            161,849.52
Subs                                  10,000.00          620.00        145.00           238.00            300.00       7.00      1,310.00                –               –         500.00             11,810.00
TPHS Staff Budget Y4

Yearly actual     Yearly Fica   OASDI+MC      SUI              WC            ETT        Yearly Tax     Total Benefits     STRS            Pension   Total
SALARY            0.062         0.0145        0.062            0.03          0.001                                        0.0825          0.05      Compensation

Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42
Teacher                      62,700.00                     909.15            434.00      1,881.00       7.00       3,231.15           3,500.52        5,172.75                      74,604.42

Total                     2,319,900.00            –      33,638.55     16,058.00        69,597.00     259.00     119,552.55         129,519.24      191,391.75         –          2,760,363.54
Counseling                       64,000.00               928.00    434.00   1,920.00   7.00    3,289.00   3,500.52    5,280.00               76,069.52
Counseling                       64,000.00               928.00    434.00   1,920.00   7.00    3,289.00   3,500.52    5,280.00               76,069.52
Counseling                       64,000.00               928.00    434.00   1,920.00   7.00    3,289.00   3,500.52    5,280.00               76,069.52
Counseling                       64,000.00               928.00    434.00   1,920.00   7.00    3,289.00   3,500.52    5,280.00               76,069.52

Principal                       125,583.00              1,820.95   434.00   3,767.49   7.00    6,029.44   3,500.52   10,360.60              145,473.56
Vice Principal                   78,375.00              1,136.44   434.00   2,351.25   7.00    3,928.69   3,500.52    6,465.94               92,270.15
Other – Flex

Teachers Subs                    39,000.00               565.50    434.00   1,170.00   7.00    2,176.50        –      3,217.50               44,394.00
Librarian                        34,235.00   2,122.57    496.41    434.00   1,027.05   7.00    4,087.03   1,587.24         –     1,711.75    41,621.02
Office – Clerical                54,080.00   3,352.96    784.16    434.00   1,622.40   7.00    6,200.52   1,587.24         –     2,704.00    64,571.76

Custodial/Yard Duty & PE Aide   170,000.00   6,324.00   2,465.00   434.00   5,100.00   7.00   14,330.00   1,854.52         –     8,500.00   194,684.52
Subs                             12,000.00     744.00     174.00   238.00     360.00   7.00    1,523.00        –           –       600.00    14,123.00
TPHS Staff Budget Y5

Yearly actual    Yearly Fica OASDI+MC    SUI          WC                 ETT            Yearly Tax      Total Benefits STRS           Pension   Total
SALARY           0.062       0.0145      0.062        0.03               0.001                                         0.0825         0.05      Compensation

Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02
Teacher                     65,500.00                  949.75       434.00           1,965.00           7.00        3,355.75        3,500.52      5,403.75                 77,760.02

Total                    2,423,500.00         –     35,140.75    16,058.00          72,705.00      259.00         124,162.75     129,519.24     199,938.75         –    2,877,120.74

Counseling                  65,000.00                  942.50       434.00           1,950.00           7.00        3,333.50        3,500.52      5,362.50                 77,196.52
Counseling                       65,000.00               942.50    434.00   1,950.00   7.00    3,333.50   3,500.52    5,362.50               77,196.52
Counseling                       65,000.00               942.50    434.00   1,950.00   7.00    3,333.50   3,500.52    5,362.50               77,196.52
Counseling                       65,000.00               942.50    434.00   1,950.00   7.00    3,333.50   3,500.52    5,362.50               77,196.52

Principal                       131,235.00              1,902.91   434.00   3,937.05   7.00    6,280.96   3,500.52   10,826.89              151,843.37
Vice Principal                   81,901.00              1,187.56   434.00   2,457.03   7.00    4,085.59   3,500.52    6,756.83               96,243.95
Other – Flex

Teachers Subs                    41,000.00               594.50    434.00   1,230.00   7.00    2,265.50        –      3,382.50               46,648.00
Librarian                        35,774.00   2,217.99    518.72    434.00   1,073.22   7.00    4,250.93   1,587.24         –     1,788.70    43,400.87
Office – Clerical                54,080.00   3,352.96    784.16    434.00   1,622.40   7.00    6,200.52   1,587.24         –     2,704.00    64,571.76

Custodial/Yard Duty & PE Aide   177,650.00   6,324.00   2,575.93   434.00   5,329.50   7.00   14,670.43   1,854.52         –     8,882.50   203,057.45
Subs                             12,000.00     744.00     174.00   238.00     360.00   7.00    1,523.00        –           –       600.00    14,123.00
TPHS 12-13 Cash Flow

Tri-Valley Learning Corporation – TPHS
Cash Forecast
Nov                                        Feb
Jul            Aug          Sep         Oct                      Dec              Jan                      Mar         Apr        May          Jun
Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual         Actual         Actual       Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual
Actual                                                                                                                                                    Accrual
BEGINNING CASH*                                    $   175,000    $   101,893 $   152,982 $   172,583 $   187,855 $      178,146 $      164,484 $    154,045 $   140,383 $   134,510 $   135,812 $   139,939
INCOME
8015 State Aid                                                          42,696      85,394      56,929      56,929         56,929            56,929    56,929      74,718      74,718      74,718                 74,718      711,608
8019 Revenue Limit State Aid – Prior Year Revenue                                                                                                                                                                                 –
8220 Child Nutrition Programs – Federal                                                                                                                                                                                           –
8298 Title V – Implementation                               –          100,000         –                                                                                                                                      100,000
8480 Charter Schools Categorical Block Grant                                                    38,624       9,690          9,690             9,690     9,690       9,690       9,690       9,690       9,690                 116,144
8560 State Lottery Revenue                                                                                   3,953                            3,223                             5,175                             12,350       26,229
8590 All Other State Revenue                                                                                                                                                                                                      –
8660 Interest                                               375            375         375         375         375            375            375          375         375         375         375         375                   4,500
8780 In Lieu of Property Tax                             48,518         48,518      48,518      48,518      48,518         48,518         48,518       48,518      48,518      48,518      48,518      48,527                 582,225
8792 Transfers from county offices – Spl Ed                                          21,433       6,945       6,945          6,945          6,945        6,945       6,945       6,945       6,945       6,945                  83,938
TOTAL INCOME                                              48,893        191,589     155,720     151,391     126,410        122,457        125,680      122,457     140,246     145,421     140,246      67,066     87,068    1,624,644


EXPENSES                                                                                                                                                                                                                           –

1000-3000 Salaries and Benefits                                          97,319      97,319      97,319      97,319         97,319            97,319    97,319      97,319      97,319      97,319      97,319     96,942    1,167,451
4000 Books and Supplies                                  102,000         22,800      12,800      12,800      12,800         12,800            12,800    12,800      12,800      12,800      12,800      12,798                 252,798
5000 Services and Other Operating Expenses                20,000         20,381      26,000      26,000      26,000         26,000            26,000    26,000      26,000      26,000      26,000      26,000                 300,381
6000 Capital Outlay                                                                                                                                                                                                                –
7000 Other Outgo                                                                                                                                                                                                                   –
CDE – Oversight                                                                                                                                                    10,000       8,000                                          18,000

Total Expenses                                           122,000        140,500     136,119     136,119     136,119        136,119        136,119      136,119     146,119     144,119     136,119     136,117     96,942    1,738,630


Net Operating Income                                     (73,107)        51,089      19,601      15,272      (9,709)        (13,662)      (10,439)     (13,662)     (5,873)      1,302       4,127      (69,051)              (104,112)

A/R
A/P
A/P current year
Ending Cash                                              101,893        152,982     172,583     187,855     178,146        164,484        154,045      140,383     134,510     135,812     139,939      70,888     (9,874)   1,723,646

Ending Fund Balance    $61,013
TPHS 13-14 Cash Flow

Tri-Valley Learning Corporation – TPHS
Cash Forecast
Nov                                       Feb
Jul           Aug          Sep         Oct                     Dec              Jan                      Mar         Apr        May          Jun
Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual        Actual         Actual       Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual
Actual                                                                                                                                                   Accrual
BEGINNING CASH*                                    $    61,013   $   141,997 $   124,483 $   216,750 $   293,650 $     321,143 $      337,670 $    360,619 $   377,146 $   410,251 $   462,733 $   515,838
INCOME
8015 State Aid                                                         87,846     174,754     117,045     117,045       117,045        117,045      117,045     153,622     153,622     153,622                 153,625    1,462,316
8019 Revenue Limit State Aid – Prior Year Revenue                                                                                                                                                                                –
8220 Child Nutrition Programs – Federal                                                                                                                                                                                          –
8298 Title V – Implementation                               –         100,000         –                                                                                                                                      100,000
8480 Charter Schools Categorical Block Grant                                                   79,474      19,102        19,101            19,102    19,101      19,102      19,102      19,102      19,102                  232,288
8560 State Lottery Revenue                                                                                 10,965                           6,421                            10,377                              24,692       52,455
8590 All Other State Revenue                                                                                                                                                                                                     –
8660 Interest                                             1,167         1,167       1,167       1,167       1,167         1,167          1,167        1,167       1,167       1,167       1,167       1,167                   14,004
8780 In Lieu of Property Tax                             99,817        99,817      99,817      99,817      99,817        99,817         99,817       99,817      99,817      99,817      99,817      99,817                1,197,804
8792 Transfers from county offices – Spl Ed                                         55,698      18,566      18,566        18,566         18,566       18,566      18,566      18,566      18,566      18,566                  222,792
TOTAL INCOME                                             100,984       288,830     331,436     316,069     266,662       255,696        262,118      255,696     292,274     302,651     292,274     138,652     178,317    3,281,659


EXPENSES                                                                                                                                                                                                                          –

1000-3000 Salaries and Benefits                                        181,435     181,435     181,435     181,435       181,435        181,435      181,435     181,435     181,435     181,435     181,435     181,430    2,177,215
4000 Books and Supplies                                      –         104,909      22,025      22,025      22,025        22,025         22,025       22,025      22,025      22,025      22,025      22,025                  325,159
5000 Services and Other Operating Expenses                20,000        20,000      35,709      35,709      35,709        35,709         35,709       35,709      35,709      35,709      35,709      35,709                  397,090
6000 Capital Outlay                                                                                                                                                                                                               –
7000 Other Outgo                                                                                                                                                                                                                  –
CDE – Oversight                                                                                                                                                  20,000      11,000                                           31,000

Total Expenses                                            20,000       306,344     239,169     239,169     239,169       239,169        239,169      239,169     259,169     250,169     239,169     239,169     181,430    2,930,460


Net Operating Income                                      80,984       (17,514)     92,267      76,900      27,493        16,527            22,949    16,527      33,105      52,482      53,105     (100,517)                354,308

A/R                                                                                                                                                                                                                               –
A/P                                                                                                                                                                                                                               –
A/P current year                                                                                                                                                                                                                  –
Ending Cash                                              141,997       124,483     216,750     293,650     321,143       337,670        360,619      377,146     410,251     462,733     515,838     415,321      (3,113)   3,974,488

Ending Fund Balance    $412,208
TPHS14-15 Cash Flow

Tri-Valley Learning Corporation – TPHS
Cash Forecast
Nov                                        Feb
Jul         Aug          Sep         Oct                     Dec              Jan                         Mar           Apr          May            Jun
Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual        Actual         Actual        Actual        Actual        Actual        Actual        Actual
Actual                                                                                                                                                         Accrual
BEGINNING CASH*                                    $412,208 $   403,377 $   379,852 $   522,418 $   744,742 $     892,330 $    1,027,249 $   1,172,410 $   1,307,329 $   1,214,076 $   1,150,253 $   1,087,000
INCOME
8015 State Aid                                                   135,903     271,779     294,427     294,427       294,427       294,427       294,427        96,255        96,255        96,255                    96,255      2,264,837
8019 Revenue Limit State Aid – Prior Year Revenue                                                                                                                                                                                     –
8220 Child Nutrition Programs – Federal                                                                                                                                                                                               –
8298 Title V – Implementation                                                    –                                                                                                                                                    –
8480 Charter Schools Categorical Block Grant                                             116,408      29,003        29,003           29,003     29,003        29,003        29,003        29,003        29,003                    348,432
8560 State Lottery Revenue                                                                            12,669                         10,242                                 16,430                                  39,347         78,688
8590 All Other State Revenue                                                                                                                                                                                                          –
8660 Interest                                         1,750        1,750       1,750       1,750       1,750         1,750         1,750         1,750         1,750         1,750         1,750         1,750                     21,000
8780 In Lieu of Property Tax                        154,419      154,419     154,419     154,419     154,419       154,419       154,419       154,419       154,419       154,419       154,419       154,419                  1,853,028
8792 Transfers from county offices – Spl Ed                                    86,787      27,489      27,489        27,489        27,489        27,489        27,489        27,489        27,489        27,489                    334,188
TOTAL INCOME                                         156,169      292,072     514,735     594,493     519,757       507,088       517,330       507,088       308,916       325,346       308,916       212,661     135,602      4,900,173


EXPENSES                                                                                                                                                                                                                               –

1000-3000 Salaries and Benefits                                   262,429     262,429     262,429     262,429       262,429       262,429       262,429       262,429       262,429       262,429       262,429     262,429      3,149,148
4000 Books and Supplies                              145,000       33,168      32,000      32,000      32,000        32,000        32,000        32,000        32,000        32,000        32,000        32,000                    498,168
5000 Services and Other Operating Expenses            20,000       20,000      77,740      77,740      77,740        77,740        77,740        77,740        77,740        77,740        77,740        77,740                    817,400
6000 Capital Outlay                                                                                                                                                                                                                    –
7000 Other Outgo                                                                                                                                                                                                                       –
CDE – Oversight                                                                                                                                               30,000        17,000                                                 47,000

Total Expenses                                       165,000      315,597     372,169     372,169     372,169       372,169       372,169       372,169       402,169       389,169       372,169       372,169                  4,511,633


Net Operating Income                                  (8,831)     (23,525)    142,566     222,324     147,588       134,919       145,161       134,919        (93,253)      (63,823)      (63,253)     (159,508)                  515,284

A/R
A/P
A/P current year
Ending Cash                                          403,377      379,852     522,418     744,742     892,330     1,027,249      1,172,410     1,307,329     1,214,076     1,150,253     1,087,000      927,492     (126,827)   10,701,701

Ending Fund Balance     $800,748
TPHS Special Ed Budget 2012-13 (Using 09-10 Funding)

Yearly      Yearly
Yearly actual    Yearly Fica         OASDI+MC       SUI        WC              ETT        Yearly Tax        Avg.         Avg.           Monthly    Yearly actual   Monthly     Yearly actual   Monthly    Yearly actual Total Benefits   STRS       Pension       Total
SALARY           0.062              0.0145       0.034       0.03           0.001                       Employer     Employee         Medical      Medical        Dental        Dental         VSP          VSP                        0.0825       0.05     Compensation
Employer       Employer     Employer       Employer    Employer

1 Resource Teacher              55,000.00                             797.50      238.00     1,650.00         7.00         2,692.50        217.65          –           217.65        2,611.80      63.66          763.92       10.40         124.80       3,500.52    4,537.50                  62,230.00
1.00 Aide                       25,000.00              1,550.00       362.50      238.00       750.00         7.00         2,907.50        217.65          –           217.65        2,611.80      63.66          763.92       10.40         124.80       3,500.52         –     1,250.00       29,157.50
1.00 Aide                       25,000.00              1,550.00       362.50      238.00       750.00         7.00         2,907.50        217.65          –           217.65        2,611.80      63.66          763.92       10.40         124.80       3,500.52         –     1,250.00       29,157.50
Teacher Subs                     1,000.00                 62.00        14.50       34.00        30.00         1.00           141.50           –            –              –               –          –               –           –              –              –         82.50                   1,224.00

Aide subs                        1,000.00                62.00         14.50       34.00           30.00      1.00          141.50            –            –              –               –          –               –           –              –              –           –          –          1,141.50

Total                          107,000.00              3,224.00     1,551.50      782.00     3,210.00        23.00         8,790.50        652.95          –           652.95        7,835.40     190.98        2,291.76       31.20         374.40      10,501.56    4,620.00   2,500.00      133,412.06

Budget Summary – 2010-11                                                                   SELPA – Projected Funding – Based on 2009-10 Funding

Revenue:
SELPA – Projected Funding – From 2009-2010 projected                 $83,938                                         Projected ADA 2012-13                                             204.12
x Funding per ADA (2009-10 rate)                                 $432.86
Total Revenue                                                                     $83,938
Funding Allocation                                                           $88,355
Expenditures:
Staff                                                                $133,412                                        Less 5% Set-Aside (all new SELPA members)                                    -$4,418
Supplies                                                               $4,100                                        Less 5% Set-Aside (high-risk charter schools)                                     $0
Set-up Costs – New Program                                             $2,500
Indirect Costs = 4.96%                                              $6,944.60
Net Funding Allocation                                                       $83,938
Total Expenditures                                                               $146,957

Surplus/-Deficit                                                                             -$63,019

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