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Tassajara Prep Charter High School Revised Charter Petition 8-1-2011

PDF of the document available here.
TASSAJARA PREPARATORY
HIGH SCHOOL

9 TO 12 GRADE

CHARTER PETITION

August 1, 2011

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Table of Contents

CHARTER SCHOOL INTENT AND CHARTER REQUIREMENTS ………………………………………… 5
AFFIRMATIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6
I.  CHARTER COMMITTEE ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7
II.   EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY & PROGRAM ……………………………………………………………….. 11
A.  MISSION ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
B.  VISION …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
C.  EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
An Educated Person in the 21st Century ……………………………………………………………………………….. 11
How Learning Best Occurs ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12
High Expectations and Culture of Achievement ……………………………………………………………………… 12
D.  TARGETED SCHOOL POPULATIONS …………………………………………………………………………………… 13
Attendance…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
E.  CURRICULUM AND CONTENT ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
Educational Program Design ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14
Diverse Pedagogy ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14
Learning Setting …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15
Student Needs and Instructional Strategies ……………………………………………………………………………. 15
Technology Integration ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15
Academic Counselors and Advisory Groups ………………………………………………………………………. 16
Academic Courses ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16
Graduation Requirements ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 17
G.  ACADEMICALLY HIGH-ACHIEVING STUDENTS ………………………………………………………………….. 18
H.  ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ………………………………………………………………………………………. 18
I.  SPECIAL EDUCATION AND STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ……………………………………………………. 20
Overview of IDEA/Section 504 …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 20
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act …………………………………………………………………………………….. 20
Services for Students under the  …………………………..IDEA …………………………………………………… 20
III.  MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES …………………………………………………………………………. 21
A.  MEASURABLE OUTCOMES ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21
STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21
SCHOOL OUTCOME GOALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21
Suggested Subject Matter Competencies ……………………………………………………………………………….. 22
History…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 22
Math ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23
Art ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23
Lifelong Learning Skills ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25
Character Development …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25
Communication ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25
Cooperation …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25
Critical Thinking …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25
Caring and Respect …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25
Citizenship ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25
Conflict Resolution ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25
Responsibility …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25
Study Skills …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25
Technological Literacy ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25
Tassajara Preparatory High School  2 August 1, 2011
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B.  METHODS TO ASSESS STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD MEETING OUTCOMES ………………………… 26
Assessment Assumptions ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 26
School Performance Criteria ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 26
Assessment Tools ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 27
Subject Area Rubrics ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27
Grade Scale ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27
Report Card ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27
Standardized Tests ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 27
Senior Institute ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 27
Community Service ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 28
C.  USE AND REPORTING OF DATA …………………………………………………………………………………………. 28
MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 28
MEASURABLE SCHOOL OUTCOMES …………………………………………………………………………………………. 29
Programmatic Report …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 29
IV.  GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE …………………………………………………………………………………………. 31
A.  NONPROFIT PUBLIC BENEFIT CORPORATION…………………………………………………………………….. 31
B.  TRI-VALLEY LEARNING CORPORATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS …………………………………………. 31
C.  CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 31
D.  CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 32
E.  ACCOUNTING MANAGER ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 32
F.  PRINCIPAL ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 32
V.  HUMAN RESOURCES ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 33
A.  EMPLOYEE QUALIFICATIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 33
Principal …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 33
Teachers ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 33
B. RETIREMENT BENEFITS …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
C.  EMPLOYEE REPRESENTATION ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 35
D.  RIGHTS OF SCHOOL EMPLOYEES ……………………………………………………………………………………… 35
E.  HEALTH AND SAFETY ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 35
Procedures for Background Checks ……………………………………………………………………………………… 36
Role of Staff as Mandated Child Abuse Reporters …………………………………………………………………… 36
TB Testing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36
Immunizations ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36
CPR /First Aid Training ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36
Medication in School ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36
Vision /Hearing/Scoliosis …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36
Emergency Preparedness …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36
Drug Free/Alcohol Free/Smoke Free Environment …………………………………………………………………. 36
Bloodborne Pathogens ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 37
Integrated Complaint and Investigation Procedure ………………………………………………………………… 37
Facility Safety ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 37
Comprehensive Sexual Harassment Policies and Procedures …………………………………………………… 37
Procedures ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 37
VI. DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCESS, OVERSIGHT, REPORTING, AND RENEWAL …. 38
A. INTENT ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 38
B. PUBLIC COMMENTS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 38
C. DISPUTES ARISING FROM WITHIN THE SCHOOL ……………………………………………………………… 38
D. DISPUTES INVOLVING TASSAJARA PREP AND/OR TRI-VALLEY LEARNING CORPORATION
AND/OR DUBLIN UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT ………………………………………………………………………….. 38
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VII. STUDENT ADMISSIONS, ATTENDANCE & SUSPENSION ± EXPULSION POLICIES 40
A.  STUDENT ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES …………………………………………………………….. 40
B.  MEANS TO ACHIEVE RACIAL/ETHNIC BALANCE REFLECTIVE OF DISTRICT ……………………….. 41
C.  ATTENDANCE ALTERNATIVES…………………………………………………………………………………………… 41
D.  PUPIL SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION ………………………………………………………………………………….. 42
VIII. REPORTING AND ACCOUNTABILITY ……………………………………………………………………… 43
A.  BUDGET AND CASH FLOW ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 43
B.  FINANCIAL REPORTING ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 43
C.  INSURANCE ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 43
D.  ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 43
E.  FACILITIES ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 44
F.  FINANCIAL AUDIT …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 44
G.  CLOSURE PROTOCOL……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 44
IX. IMPACT ON THE DISTRICT …………………………………………………………………………………………… 46
A.  POTENTIAL CIVIL LIABILITY EFFECTS ……………………………………………………………………………… 46
Intent ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 46
Civil Liability …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 46
X. CONCLUSION ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 47

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CHARTER SCHOOL INTENT AND CHARTER REQUIREMENTS

It is the intent of the California Legislature, in enacting the Charter Schools Act of 1992, to
provide opportunities for teachers, parents, pupils, and community members to establish and
maintain schools that operate independently from the existing school district structure, as a
method to accomplish all of the following:

(a) Improve pupil learning.

(b) Increase learning opportunities for all pupils, with special emphasis on expanded
learning experiences for pupils identified as academically low achieving.

(c) Encourage the use of different and innovative teaching methods.

(d) Create new professional opportunities for teachers, including the opportunity to
be responsible for the learning program at the school site.

(e) Provide parents and pupils with expanded choices in the types of educational
opportunities that are available within the public school system.

(f) Hold the schools established under this legislation accountable for meeting
measurable pupil outcomes, and provide the schools with a method to change
from rule-based to performance-based accountability systems.

(g) Provide vigorous competition within the public school system to stimulate
continual improvements in all public schools.

The Charter Schools Act (or Act) (Education Code Sections 47600 et seq.) requires each charter
school to have a charter that outlines at least theme sis of the Act.  The xteen (16) mandatory it
following provisions of this charter coincide with the requirements of Section 47605 of the Act.
Tassajara Preparatory High School  5 August 1, 2011
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AFFIRMATIONS

· Tassajara Preparatory High School (³Tassajara Prep, TPHS, School, Charter School)
shall be non-sectarian in its programs, admissions policies, employment practices, and all
other operations.  Tassajara Prep shall not charge tuition and shall not discriminate against
any pupil on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, or disability.
· Tassajara Prep shall comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws.
· Tassajara Prep shall admit all pupils within the State of California who wish to attend the
School, subject to capacity.  If Tassajara Prep receives a greater number of students who
wish to attend the School, upon the submission of a timely application, each applicant will be
given an equal chance of admission through a random lottery process.
· Tassajara Prep will be operated by the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation.  All meetings of the
Board of the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation shall be held in compliance with the Brown
Act.
· Tassajara Prep shall comply with all applicable state and federal laws in serving students
with disabilities including, but not limited to, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1974,
Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the Individuals with Disabilities
in Education Act.
· Tassajara Prep shall offer, at a minimum, the same number of minutes of instruction set forth
in paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Education Code Section 46201 for the appropriate
grade levels.
· Tassajara Prep shall maintain accurate and current written records that document all pupil
attendance and make these records available for audit and inspection.
· Tassajara Prep shall meet all state standards and conduct the pupil assessments required
pursuant to Education Code Section 60605 and any other statewide standards authorized in
statute or pupil assessments applicable to pupils in non-charter public schools.
· Tassajara Prep shall on a regular basis consult with its parents and teachers regarding the
Schools education prog rams.
· Tassajara Prep shall meet all requirements for employment set forth in applicable provisions
of law including, but not limited to, credentials as necessary.
· Tassajara Prep will ensure that teachers in the School hold a Commission on Teacher
Credentialing certificate, permit, or other document equivalent to that which a teacher in
other public schools are required to hold.  As allowed by law, flexibility may be given to
non-core, non-college, and preparatory teachers.
· Tassajara Prep will maintain all necessary and appropriate insurance coverage.

Tassajara Preparatory High School  6 August 1, 2011
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I.  CHARTER COMMITTEE

Experience Overview of Charter Submittal Committee

Submittal Group
CurriculumInstructionAssessmentFinanceFacilitiesBusinessManagement OrganizationGovernanceFounder
AdministrationTassajara  Prep
William Batchelor
Tara Aderman
Rully Kusuma
Tim Hall
John M. Zukoski
Jimmy Huang
Len Di Giovanni
Neil Cowles
Rick Swiers
Derek Austin
Julie Lassig
Jerry Mullins
Dave Vopnford
John P. Zukoski
Lauren Kelly

Bill Batchelor is Chief Operating Officer of Tri-Valley Learning Corporation (TVLC).  Bill holds a
Bachelors Degree in Finance and Business Administration from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
He has fourteen years experience in financial planning, wealth management and business leadership.   He
has served on the boards of several non-profits and is the former Board President and Treasurer of LCLC
(TVLC).

Tara Aderman earned her Administrative Credential in 2007 and is the principal of Livermore Valley
Charter School (LVCS). She has eight years teaching experience and was recognized as the 2005 Teacher
of the Year in Monterey County. Mrs. Aderman spent many years as Adjunct Site Faculty member with
the Cal State teach program mentoring new teachers and is a certified Tribes trainer. She earned her
Masters degree in Curriculum and Education and is looking forward to completing her Ed.D in School
Administration. Mrs. Aderman has been invited to present at national, state and local conferences and has
had various journal articles published.

Rully Kusuma holds a BBA in Computer Information Systems from Eastern Michigan University with
over 13 years experience in the IT industry. He is a Network/Systems Administrator for Workday, Inc.
and was formerly the Computer Lab Supervisor for Eastern Michigan University. Rully holds a board of
director seat on Elan at Dublin Station Home Owners Association and is a founder of Tassajara Prep.

Tim Hall holds a Degree in Hispanic Studies from the University of Barcelona, Spain, a BS in Math and
a BA in Spanish from San Francisco State University, and an MS in Computer Science from Santa Clara
University.  Tim also earned a California Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential at San Francisco State
University. He is a retired Software Engineer and Computer Programming Instructor with over 30 years
of experience at Lockheed Martin, where he was the recipient of the Robert E. Gross Award given
annually to the top technical employee in the corporation. He was also an Independent Software
Developer and the creator of FileWave and GraceLAN, winner of MacWorld and MacWEEK Software of
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the Year Awards. He has worked as a volunteer elementary school music teacher and a volunteer in the
Big Brother program. Tim is a founder of Tassajara Prep.

John M. Zukoski holds a BBA Degree in Finance from Boise State University and an MBA from San
Jose State University.  He holds Certified Management Accountant and Certified in Financial
Management designations.  He is currently Senior Manager at Robert Half International.  John is
Publisher of the Around Dublin Blog, Vice President of the Dublin Rotary Club, serves on the Camp
Galileo Advisory Committee, Board Member for Shakespeare Associates, and is a founder of Tassajara
Prep.

Jimmy Huang holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Chemistry from Reed College and a Master of Science
in Biochemistry from Stanford University.  He is currently a Software Developer III in the Sequencing
Informatics Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.  Jimmy works as the technical director
and the site administrator for the Around Dublin Blog and is a founder of Tassajara Prep.

Len Di Giovanni, COO of Boresha International Inc., brings 30 years of success directing multi-faceted
business units, with a unique blend of skills and a proven record of achieving results.  Len graduated from
St. Mary’s College in Kansas with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Business Administration and English. He
served in the United States Army as 1st lieutenant field artillery, and in Vietnam as a Forward Observer
and appointed Battery Executive Officer, received two Bronze Stars for his exceptional service. Len
believes in community outreach and service voluntarily serving on several Board of Directors seats
including The Floor Covering Installation Contractors Association, Just Say Y.E.S. Foundation, Shiloh
Christian Fellowship, Global Education Partnership, the Advisory Board of Floor Universe, and as a
teacher of Biblical Studies at the college level.

Neil Cowles is the Chief Executive Officer of Tolven Inc., an open source healthcare software and
services provider that is changing the existing paradigm of healthcare information systems adoption in the
global healthcare marketplace. Born in Norwich, England, Neil Cowles trained and practiced as a
radiographer in England and Australia prior to focusing on healthcare management, information
technology and business management. Cowles has extensive experience in business management and
acquisitions and mergers. At the beginning of 2006, Neil Cowles left Oracle Corporation to become one
of the co-founders and the Chief Executive Officer of Tolven Inc., which is focused on a consumer-
centric, industry standards approach to delivering healthcare information solutions.

Rick Swiers holds a B.S. in Mass Communications from the University of Tennessee and a MBA in
Management from Fairleigh Dickinson University. He has an extensive background in communications
technology and has held key management positions with a number of leading edge technology companies
domestically and internationally. He was co-chair for the LVCS Charter Submittal Committee as well as
co-chair of the Legal Committee and a Choice for Children Education Foundation board member.

Derek Austin is an attorney licensed in California. His charter school work spans his entire legal career.
Originally representing and educating school districts across California on the Charter Schools Act, Derek
now exclusively represents charter schools in all aspects of the law. Specifically, Derek has experience
with charter school petition development and renewal, corporate governance, fiscal oversight and policy,
audit defense, dispute resolution, Proposition 39 and facilities use agreements, bond financing, Ralph M.
Brown Act, and litigation, including defending a charter school client against a $1M civil personal injury
complaint. Derek also has a background in employment and labor law, which enhances his charter school
practice.

Tassajara Preparatory High School  8 August 1, 2011
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Julie Lassig is Director of Development for Tri-Valley Learning Corporation. Ms. Lassig holds a B.S. in
Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She worked in microelectronics,
semiconductor capital equipment, and technical industries for over fifteen years with responsibilities that
included managing technical and sales support activities for national and international accounts, directing
development projects, and creating technical and marketing communications (including press releases,
data sheets, advertisements, and product description guides). She ran her own technical writing business
for over 4 years providing services to high-tech companies in California and New York. Julies passion is
education. She has worked as a grant writer and program specialist for Ohlone College, has served on
numerous school technology committees, has been a piano teacher, a substitute math and science teacher,
and a mentor for pre-engineering students at the community college level.

Jerry Mullins participated in the creation of the Livermore Valley Charter School and served on its board
during the initial years of the schools operation. Three of h²is chi a daughldter ren have attended LVCS
now entering 7th grade and two sons entering 10th grade at Livermore Valley Charter Prep. A graduate of
the U.S. Naval Academy, he served in Naval Aviation in both the Mediterranean and Western Pacific
before completing a Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. He joined Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory in 1979, where his principal assignments have involved research on the proliferation of
weapons of mass destruction. He has also served in Washington as Special Advisor to the Assistant
Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs, and he has been a Ford Foundation fellow at the Stanford
University Center for International Security and Cooperation.

Dave Vopnford holds a BA in Business Administration from the University of Washington. He has an
extensive background in project management, application development and financial systems design. He
is currently employed at Topcon Positioning Systems in Livermore, CA as a Technical Analyst designing
web applications, developing reporting systems, and championing technical innovation. Outside the office
Dave enjoys coaching LYSL youth soccer where his teams are generally recognized for their positive
attitude, ability and most importantly simply having fun.

John P. Zukoski has been practicing as a tax accountant and financial advisor since 1985. He
concentrates in personalized financial and tax planning services for individuals and corporations. In 1990;
John formed A to Z, CPAs, PC using his experience and contacts to grow a practice that concentrates in
highly personalized tax and financial planning services. His diverse background affords him the unique
opportunity of utilizing the angles of both tax and investment strategies when working with
clients.KàAdditionally, John is a member of the California Society CPA and American Institute of
Certified Public Accountants. He is a Graduate of Cal State University Hayward, BS, Business
Management 1979.

Lauren Kelly is the Principal of Livermore Valley Charter Preparatory High School (LVCP). Ms. Kelly
graduated from San Francisco State University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Broadcasting and
Communication. She received her California Clear Teaching Credential in Mathematics and Journalism,
along with her Master of Education in Secondary Education from the University of California, Los
Angeles (UCLA), where she was a participant in the Principal Leadership Institute (PLI). Ms. Kelly also
earned a second Master of Education in Educational Administration, and her Administrative Credential at
UCLAs PLI. Ms. Kelly has taught and coached in public andgh schools. She  private middle and hi
appeared in the Whos Who Among Americas Teachers in 2002 through student nomination. She has
been a Vice Principal at Amador Valley High School and at Harvest Park Middle School for the
Pleasanton Unified School District. Through her leadership, each school was named as a National School
of Character. Her focus has also been on working with test data, teachers, and counselors to ensure that all
students achieve equitable and successful outcomes. The Association of California School Administrators
named Ms. Kelly the regional Co-Administrator of the year in 2004. In the corporate world, she
developed, wrote and implemented training programs for employees and customers. She co-founded
Tassajara Preparatory High School  9 August 1, 2011
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Hoop Masters in Los Angeles, a non-profit, co-ed youth basketball program designed for children who
wanted to experience athletics at the local and national level, and worked with youth from more than 85
schools.

Tassajara Preparatory High School  10 August 1, 2011
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II.   EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY & PROGRAM
A description of the educational program of the school, designed, among other things, to identify those
whom the school is attempting to educate, what it means to be an “educated person” in the 21st century,
and how learning best occurs.  The goals identified in that program shall include the objective of
enabling pupils to become self-motivated, competent, and lifelon g learners.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(A)
A.  MISSION
Tassajara Prep will provide a comprehensive college-prep environment that represents the
highest academic and civic standards for all students, establishing a solid foundation for success
in premier universities and beyond through rigorous curricula, innovative teaching practices, and
integration of the latest technology in the classroom.
B.  VISION
Our vision is to instill our students with a passion for learning and creativity through a
partnership of ardent educators, staff, and families.  Our graduates will be accomplished
communicators and critical thinkers, with a commitment to values of self-discipline, integrity,
independence, collaboration, social responsibility, and community service.
C.  EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY
Tassajara Prep will educate students from Dublin and the greater Tri-Valley area, whose families
are seeking a college preparatory education in a small school environment.

An Educated Person in the 21st Century
st
The 21 century will see a continuing expansion in knowledge and a world becoming more
interdependent in an increasingly global society.  As a result of these changes, businesses will
continue to require a workforce with significant problem-solving, multifaceted communication,
and technological skills.  In order to be productive and successful members of their community,
st
21 century high school graduates need increasingly technical, yet at the same time increasingly
diverse, educations that place in context the technology around them.

st
Tassajara Prep envisions educated persons in the 21 century as those who are aware of
themselves and the world around them, are skilled in the latest communication tools, and possess
an understanding of the environmental, historical, and cultural issues that shape and have shaped
the world in which they are maturing.  Together with a strong base in science, mathematics, and
humanities, they should possess a familiarity with, and appreciation for, the arts, and celebrate
their own creative talents.

st
Educated adults in the 21 century must understand their own learning style, including how to
capitalize on strengths and overcome weakness.  They need to work cooperatively with others
from diverse backgrounds, identify and solve problems, and be able to resolve conflicts in a
st
constructive manner.   Above all else, 21 century learners should be imbued with a love of
learning, a profound curiosity, an uninhibited sense of questioning and examination, and a
powerful sense of self-direction.

The Tassajara Prep educational philosophy acknowledges that learning is a continuous process
that extends beyond school hours into the home, among peers, and in the greater community.
Tassajara Preparatory High School  11 August 1, 2011
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How Learning Best Occurs
At Tassajara Prep, we believe learning best occurs when students are engaged in a
comprehensive curriculum through innovative instructional design in an environment that
promotes learning in a challenging and exciting manner.  A comprehensive curriculum, we
believe, is one that sets subjects in context and demonstrates to students the interconnectedness
of core knowledge.  Tassajara Prep faculty will be encouraged to use innovative teaching
methods and, to the greatest degree possible, collaborate on curriculum and school governance,
as a means of increasing their sense of ownership and involvement with the school community.
Tassajara Prep believes that a school should be a dynamic learning community embodying the
best practices of teaching and learning.  To this end, Tassajara Prep will provide a safe,
connected, flexible learning community.

High Expectations and Culture of Achievement
Tassajara Prep will strive to produce healthy, successful, highly motivated citizens.  Our vision
of an excellent high school is one that maintains a culture of achievement through a program that
stresses high standards and a commitment to assist all Tassajara Prep students toward success.
Educators at Tassajara Prep will hold high expectations of their students.  All students will
follow a common set of rigorous academic standards and meet a strict code of conduct in a
supportive atmosphere conducive to learning.

All course work at the school will be designed to help students prepare for the rigor and
challenges of a four-year college or university.  Tassajara Prep will offer a challenging
curriculum based upon the California State Standards and admission to the University of
California system.  Successful completion of the academic program at Tassajara Prep will expose
students to the demanding academic challenges they will face in college:  extensive reading,
large-scale research papers and projects, lecture-format classes, and high-stakes testing.  In
addition, Tassajara Prep students will be practiced public speakers.  The culture of the school is
built around the notion of college success for all.
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D.  TARGETED SCHOOL POPULATIONS

#of
Average Year Grade
# Of Students
Grade Class Size Level is
Classes Per
Ratio Commenced
Grade
th
9 27 8 216 2012 ± 2013
th
10 27 8 216 2013 – 2014
th
11 27 8 216 2014 – 2015
th
12 27 8 216 2015 ± 2016

Tassajara Prep will educate students entering ninth grade in the fall of 2012, and will add a grade
each year in order to accommodate ninth through twelfth grade by school year 2015-2016.
Tassajara Prep is a tuition-free, non-sectarian public school of choice.  We do not discriminate
based upon race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, gender, culture, disability, or sexual
orientation.

Priority for students enrolling in Tassajara Prep shall begin with students from the Dublin
community, followed by any interested students in the State of California.  During periods of
funding under the Public Charter School Grant program (PCSGP), additional enrollment
preferences will not be in effect.

We anticipate that Tassajara Prep will attract those who are seeking an alternative to their current
educational system, desire an innovative education approach, and share the vision of Tassajara
Prep.  Students attending Tassajara Prep will be willing to take responsibility for their
educational choices, will want a school environment with high expectations, and will be
motivated to achieve excellence in education.  Students at Tassajara Prep will receive greater
personal attention and individualized instruction than they might at a larger, traditional high
school.

Attendance
The Schools academic calendar shall commence before September 30 in accordance with State
charter school guidelines, and shall include, but not be limited to, 180 instructional days.

The number of instructional minutes for all grades shall meet or exceed the States requirements
in Education Code Section 46201(a)(3).

Tassajara Prep parents/guardians are responsible for sending their students to school and
providing an explanation for student absences.  Tassajara Prep shall develop policies to
encourage regular attendance and for reporting truancies to appropriate local authorities.

E.  CURRICULUM AND CONTENT
Curriculum at Tassajara Prep will be designed to prepare students to be successful participants in
the integrated world beyond the classroom.  Our curriculum will create learning situations in
Tassajara Preparatory High School  13 August 1, 2011
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which students delve deeply into their assignments to understand and master the material.
Students are taught to find depth in each topic, assess its complexity, and be accountable for
demonstrating proficiency in their learning.  Students will develop methods of analysis, learn to
communicate with others through a variety of methods, use creativity and imagination, develop
self-discipline, and learn to act on their own beliefs.

1. Tassajara Prep students will understand logic and the roles of evidence and inference
as a basis for approaching the whole panoply of other learning goals.  In support of
this primary objective, Tassajara Prep educators will focus on academic skills and
approaches to problem solving through backward design.

2. Tassajara Prep will provide students with the opportunities to develop strong oral
communication skills.  Our students will make oral presentations to classes, teachers,
parents, and members of the community.  We believe the ability to present and defend
ideas orally is critical for success in higher education and professional life.

3. Tassajara Prep will encourage our educators to take an interdisciplinary or
multidisciplinary approach in their instruction by integrating traditional core classes.
Tassajara Prep will expose students to the connections among and between the
traditional academic disciplines.  Teachers work together as a team to integrate
instructional materials.

4. Tassajara Prep students will be taught explicitly how to study and approach academic
tasks that will help them perform successfully at the college level.

5. Tassajara Prep educators will emphasize long-term, multi-disciplinary assignments.

6. Tassajara Prep will encourage our educators to leverage the Bay Area’s
environmental, cultural, and intellectual resources to supplement the curriculum
through practical learning.

7. Tassajara Prep students will prepare a Senior Exhibition.  This event will
demonstrate, in a variety of ways, the students mastery of the skills and knowledge
required for graduation.

Educational Program Design
The small school structure and educational program design reflects current research and
Tassajara Prep beliefs about how learning best occurs.  Educational researchers have found
that when compared to large schools, small schools have better attendance, stronger academic
achievement, lower drop-out rates, fewer failed courses, greater participation in activities, and
fewer behavioral incidents.

Diverse Pedagogy
Tassajara Prep parents and educators recognize that students learn in different ways and no one
teaching method will work for all students.  In addition to providing students with a range of
ways to succeed, pedagogy needs to be adapted and be culturally responsive.  To ensure that all
students are actively engaged in learning, Tassajara Prep educators shall develop instructional
Tassajara Preparatory High School  14 August 1, 2011
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programs incorporating the theory of multiple intelligences to build on each students strengths
and to address diverse learning styles.  These instructional programs will see that instruction is
1
delivered through a variety of modalities ² auditory, visual, multimedia, and kinesthetic.
Examples of these multiple intelligence strategies include Inquiry-Based Instruction, Direct
Instruction, Cooperative Learning, Socratic Seminars, and Experiential Learning.

Learning Setting
Learning at Tassajara Prep will take place in many settings during the day on a traditional school
campus.  Students will be immersed in a classroom setting with a low student-teacher ratio to
facilitate interaction and exploration.  The goal is to have a campus complemented by a science
research lab, a music room, an art room, a performing arts facility, research gardens, a library
equipped with a multi-media center and a language lab, and physical education facilities.

Through a program incorporating small class size, increased staff-student interaction,
individualized instruction, academic and personal counseling, and ongoing formal and informal
assessments, faculty at the School will be able to know and meet the learning styles and needs of
students at Tassajara Prep so that the students may, in turn, be focused on meeting and exceeding
the state academic standards.  These programs are designed to support all students, including
those not meeting desired achievement goals.

Student Needs and Instructional Strategies
Tassajara Prep parents and educators understand that a successful student today is one who has
the ability to think in a sophisticated fashion, communicate in a variety of ways, and collaborate
as a team member.  Students at Tassajara Prep will delve deeply into subjects and see
interconnections amongst the different disciplines.  Educators at Tassajara Prep will provide
opportunities in their regular curriculum to incorporate interdisciplinary, project-based learning
in their subjects.

In addition to fostering creativity, project-based, inductive learning will provide students with
hands-on experience, opportunities to enhance problem-solving and leadership skills, and the
chance for all students to make their education more related to their future careers and interests.

See Appendix B — Academic Program for additional information.

Technology Integration
st
Computer technology in the 21 century is a powerful tool when used to enhance student
learning.  At Tassajara Prep, students and educators will incorporate technology into a multitude
st
of learning tasks.  A well-designed technological infrastructure will help create a model 21
century learning environment, encourage students to learn efficiently, and prepare them to be
part of a technological workforce.

Our use of technology will serve as a catalyst to foster authentic constructivist, project-based
learning in a variety of disciplines.  Multimedia tools and instructional aid will facilitate learning
that is tailored to the learning process.  At points throughout the day, students may perform tasks
such as research on the web, work on a written report or video presentation, participate in an

1
Howard Gardner. Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligences for the 21st Century. New York: Basic Books, 1999.
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online discussion, view a web-cast, publish on a weblog or website, run a simulation, create a
design, learn an application, or develop a custom application.

Community-Based and Service-Based Learning
We will invite community members into the classroom to help enhance students educational
experiences, to serve as a resource for project-based learning, and to validate skills developed in
the classroom.  Students at Tassajara Prep will have opportunities to explore career interests
through industry speakers, work site tours, job shadows, mentors, and internships.

Tassajara Prep strongly believes that the measure of a persons success is in what they give to
others.  Our program will intentionally integrate the service experience with our core curriculum
and content standards.  The Tassajara Prep service component will require students to complete a
staff-approved community service project as a condition of graduation.  Through our community
service requirement, we will encourage students to meet a real community need and, if possible,
to coordinate with another community organization.  Our goal is for Tassajara Prep students to
develop a strong sense of civic responsibility and establish the foundation for a lifetime of
meaningful community involvement.  The student service projects will be conceived and
designed by the students themselves.  As a result, students will not only deepen and demonstrate
their learning, they will be empowered to become leaders and benefit the community in which
they live.  Students will develop relationships with adults who make tangible contributions to the
community and work with them to create opportunities to apply their learning in a real world
setting through community service.

Academic Counselors and Advisory Groups
An Academic Counselor will follow the incoming freshmen during their four years at Tassajara
Prep.  Academic Counselors will help students evaluate their abilities, interests, talents, and
personality characteristics in order to develop challenging academic goals that maximize student
potential to open various career paths.  Counselors may use interviews, counseling sessions,
interest and aptitude tests, and other methods to evaluate and advise students.  Academic
Counselors advise students regarding college majors, admission requirements, entrance exams,
financial aid, and apprenticeship programs.  As the need arises, counselors will also be available
for personal counseling.

Academic Courses
The academic courses offered at Tassajara Prep will be structured to prepare students to pursue
higher education.  The faculty will be actively involved in shaping and continually updating the
courses to provide the most current educational experience.  The California State Board of
Education has established content and performance standards.  Students will be accountable for
reaching these standards in the core disciplines² English/Language Arts, Mathematics,
History/Social Science, and Science.  Additional standards that students are accountable for
include Foreign Language, Visual and Performing Arts, and Physical Education.

Tassajara Prep graduates will be required to meet the basic curriculum requirements for
graduation as detailed by the State of California Board of Education; however, students may
have the option to fulfill some course requirements on a pre-approval basis, through approved,
on-line coursework from accredited institutions, or approved coursework at a local college as
explained in Education Code Section 48800-48802.

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Tassajara Prep will provide students and parents with a course catalog or its equivalent, notifying
parents about transferability of courses to other public high schools and the eligibility of courses
to meet college entrance requirements.

All curricula at Tassajara Prep will be based upon the core California State Content Standards
and be designed to develop a foundation of basic skills as well as cultivate higher-order thinking
and problem-solving skills.  Tassajara Prep students will demonstrate mastery of a core set of
basic, academic skills before moving onto higher-level, more abstract material.

See the following appendices for additional information: B ± Academic Program, C ±
Curriculum Development, D ± Draft Course Descriptions, E ± University of California
Course Approval Timeline, G ± Enrichment Plan, N ± Data and Assessment, and Sample
Daily Schedule in Appendix O ± Family-Student Handbook.

Graduation Requirements
As a condition of graduation from Tassajara Prep, each student attending Tassajara Prep (for the
entire 4 years) will be required to m-eG requiet the Arements needed for admission to a
California State University, a University of California, or other institution of higher learning.
This Tassajara Prep requirement exceeds the graduation requirements detailed by the State of
California Board of Education.  See II. Overview of the Educational Program at Tassajara
Prep in Appendix O ± Family-Student Handbook for a table comparing Tassajara Preps
graduation requirements to state graduation requirements and California university entrance
requirements.

F.  ACADEMICALLY LOW-ACHIEVING STUDENTS
Tassajara Prep maintains a culture of high expectations for all students.  For those whose
achievement potential is not being realized, administrators and teachers will work to ensure that
no individual student falls behind.  The structure of the Tassajara Prep curriculum and the
instructional strategies outlined here are designed to maximize the learning opportunities for
low-achieving and at-risk students.  Low-achieving and at-risk students are thoroughly integrated
into the entire student body, and they participate fully in all aspects of the curriculum at the
School.

At Tassajara Prep, low-achieving students are defined as those who perform at basic level on the
California State Standards Exams, and/or those who earn one or more C- or below per grading
period. They may also fall below the learning behavior, language acquisition, and fine & gross
motor skills in comparison with their peer group.

At-risk students are defined as those who perform at below basic or far below basic level on
California Standards Exams and/or do not pass the California High School Exit Exam on the first
attempt and/or who earn one or more failing grade per grading period. They may also be
identified by informal teacher assessments or prior progress reports.

Low-achieving and at-risk students may or may not qualify for special education services or EL
services.

Tassajara Prep considers both groups as students who have not realized their full achievement
potentials.
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Parents of at-risk or low-achieving students are contacted and consulted in the development of
strategies to meet the specific needs of the student through the Student Success Team (SST)
process.  An SST uses a systematic problem-solving approach to assist students with concerns
that are interfering with success.  The SST clarifies problems and concerns, develops strategies
and organizes resources, provides a system for school accountability, and serves to assist the
parent, the teacher, and the student.

After the implementation and follow-up of an SST plan, if the problem persists, revisions to the
plan may be discussed, and a referral for special education evaluation or Section 504 assessment
may be considered necessary by the SST.

For additional information, see Appendix J ± Student Remediation Plan, Appendix K ±
Student Success Team, and Academically Low-Achieving Students in Appendix N ± Data
and Assessment.

G.  ACADEMICALLY HIGH-ACHIEVING STUDENTS
Tassajara Prep is committed to providing those students who are achieving above grade level
with Advanced Placement and Honors course credit opportunities to study the core curriculum
in-depth and at an accelerated pace, allowing for uniqueness in student outcome and emphasizing
higher level thinking skills.  Students who are identified as achieving above grade level will be
encouraged to participate in enrichment activities designed to challenge their special abilities.

For more information, see the Academically High-Achieving Students section in Appendix N
± Data and Assessments
H.  ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Tassajara Prep will meet all applicable legal requirements for English Language Learners (ELL)
as they pertain to annual notification to parents, student identification, placement, program
options, ELL and core content instruction, teacher qualifications and training, re-classification to
fluent English proficient status, monitoring and evaluating program effectiveness, and
standardized testing requirements.

The following Tassajara Prep procedures ensure the proper placement, evaluation, and
communication regarding ELL student rights or those of their parent or guardian.  A home
language survey is taken upon a students initian into the School.  For alll enrollment appli catio
students who indicate that their home language is other than English, the California English
2
Language Development Test (CELDT) is administered within thirty days of initial enrollment
stst
and at least annually thereafter between July 1 and October 31 until the student is re-
designated as fluent English proficient.

Tassajara Prep staff notifies all parents of the Schools responsibility for CELDT testing and of
CELDT results within thirty days of receiving results from the publisher.  The CELDT shall be

2
The thirty-day requirement applies to students who are entering a California public school for the first time or for students who have not yet
been tested by the CELDT.  All other students who have indicated a home language other than English will continue with annual CELDT testing
from their prior school of enrollment.
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used to fulfill the requirements under the No Child Left Behind Act for annual English
proficiency testing.

ELL Reclassification Procedures
Reclassification procedures use multiple criteria in determining whether to classify a pupil as
proficient in English including, but not limited to, one or more of the following:

· Assessment of language proficiency using an objective assessment instrument including,
but not limited to, the CELDT;
· Participation of the pupils classroom teachers and any other certificated staff with direct
responsibility for teaching or placement decisions of the pupil;
· Comparison of the pupils performance in basic skills against the performance of English
proficient pupils of the same age;
· The Student Oral Language Observation Matrix (SOLOM) may be used by teachers to
measure progress regarding comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, pronunciation, and
grammar usage.

ELL Strategies for Instruction and Intervention
Teachers who serve ELL students are trained to use Specially Designed Academic Instruction in
English (SDAIE) techniques to meet the needs of English Language Learners.  The instructional
design model used by Tassajara Prep places a heavy emphasis on differentiating instruction² a
key strategy for English Language Learner success.  Other strategies may include, but are not
limited to, the following techniques:

1. Identifying Similarities and Differences.
2. Summarizing and Note Taking.
3. Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition.
4. Homework and Practice.
5. Nonlinguistic Representation.
6. Cooperative Learning.
7. Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback.
8. Generating and Testing Hypotheses.
9. Cues, Questions, and Advanced Organizers.

These nine instructional strategies are proven to be effective strategies for all students, including
3
ELL students.

The School shall comply with all applicable federal law in regard to services and the education
of English Language Learner (ELL) students.  The School shall, implement, and  develop
maintain policies and procedures for the provision of services to ELL students in accordance
with guidance published by the Office of Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education.  At a
minimum these policies and procedures shall:

· Identify students who need assistance including the use of a home language survey and
mandatory CELDT testing as required by law.

3
Robert Marzano. Classroom Instruction That Works.  New York: ASCD, 2001.  Jana Echevarria & Anne Graves. Sheltered Content Instruction:
Teaching English-Language Learners with Diverse Abilities.  New York: Allyn and Bacon, 2003.

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· Ensure that necessary, appropriately credentialed staff (CLAD), curricular materials, and
facilities are in place and used properly.
· Develop appropriate evaluation standards, including program exit criteria, for measuring
the progress of students.
· Assess the success of the program and modify it where needed.

See Appendix N ± Data and Assessment for more information.

I.  SPECIAL EDUCATION AND STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Overview of IDEA/Section 504
Tassajara Prep shall comply with all applicable State and Federal Laws in serving students with
disabilities.  These laws include, but are not limited to, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
(Section 504), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the Individuals with
Disabilities in Education Improvemen t Act (IDEA).

Tassajara Prep shall be categorized as an LEA in conformity with Education Code Section
47641(b). Tassajara Prep will comply with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between
the Charter Schools and ECOE SELPA.

Tassajara Prep shall comply with all state and federal laws related to the provision of special
education instruction and related services and all SELPA policies and procedures.  In addition,
Tassajara Prep shall utilize all appropriate SELPA forms.

Tassajara Prep shall be solely responsible for its compliance with Section 504 and the ADA.
The District facilities to be utilized by the School shall be accessible for all students with
disabilities.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
Tassajara Prep recognizes its legal responsibility to ensure that no qualified person with a
disability shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation, be denied the benefits
of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program of the School.  Any student
who has an objectively identified disability that substantially limits a major life activity, which
includes, but is not limited to, learning, is eligible for accommodation by the School.

Services for Students under  the IDEA
Tassajara Prep intends to provide special education instruction and related services in accordance
with the IDEA, Education Code requirements, and applicable policies and practices of the
Special Education Local Plan Area (SELTassajara PrPA). ep shall be categorized as an LEA in
conformity with Education Code Section 47641(b). Tassajara Prep will comply with a
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Charter Schools and EC OE SELPA.

Tassajara Prep will follow SELPA policies and procedures, and will utilize SELPA forms in
seeking out and identifying and serving students who may qualify for special education programs
and services, and for responding to record requests and maintaining the confidentiality of pupil
records.
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III.  MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES
The measurable pupil outcomes identified for use by the charter school.  Pupil outcomes, for
purposes of this part, means the extent to which all pupils of the school demonstrate that they have
attained the skills, knowledge, and attitudes specified as goals in the school’s educational program.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(B)

METHODS TO ASSESS STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD MEETING OUTCOMES
The method by which pupil progress in meeting those pupil out comes is to be measured.´
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(C)

Tassajara Preparatory outcomes are meant to align with the mission, curriculum, and assessment
of the school.  Upon graduation, students will demonstrate the following core academic and
lifelong learning skills, which have been developed to meet and exceed the California State
Curriculum Standards.

A.  MEASURABLE OUTCOMES
STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS
Through the senior project, community service project, official transcripts, personal portfolios,
public exhibitions, and standardized testing, Tassajara Prep students will demonstrate attainment
of the following goals:

· Students will demonstrate a mastery of designated outcome goals in the areas of English
Literature, History, Math, Science, Art, and Foreign Language.  Suggested goals, subject
to revision, are listed below in Suggested Subject Matter Competenc ies.´
· 100% of our students will demonstrate proficiency on the CST in English Language,
History, Science and Math (defined as meeting or exceeding the state standards, scoring
350 or above on the CSTs, or scoring 35 or above on the CAPA).
th
· 100% of our students will pass the CAHSEE before graduation. Over 95% of 10 graders
will pass the exam on their first try.
· Students will take and pass the classes necessary to be eligible for admission to the
University of California and California State University systems.
· Students will be provided with opportunities to demonstrate effective communication,
critical thinking, and personal and social responsibility.
· Students will demonstrate social responsibility by planning and implementing community
service projects.
· Students will participate in the Senior Institute and take ownership of a Senior Project.
The results of the Senior Projects will be displayed and evaluated during the Senior
Exhibition.

More information about data and assessments can be found in Appendix N ± Data and
Assessment.
SCHOOL OUTCOME GOALS
Tassajara Prep will pursue the following school outcome goals:

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· The School will demonstrate progress in the aggregated results of the pupil outcomes
listed above.
· The School will have a high student attendance rate (with a preliminary goal of 97%
ADA).
· The School will have a low student dropout rate.  Dropouts are defined as those students
who were enrolled at Tassajara Prep, left the school before graduation, and did not enroll
in another school or institution of learning. In the first five years, the grade 9-12, 4-year
derived dropout rate will be less than 5%.
· The School will have a high rank (6 or higher) on the California Academic Performance
Similar Schools index in the first five years.
· The School will perform in the top 20% of the state on the Academic Performance Index
(API) and will pursue continuous growth on the API and, if applicable, its API growth
target.
· The School will meet 7 out of 7 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria and will
continuously pursue AYP.

We expect that Tassajara Preps charter will be renewed, if we can demonstrate that the school
met or made significant progress on these or reasonably revised pupil and school outcome goals.

Suggested Subject Matter Competencies
As described above, Tassajara Prep expects its graduates to demonstrate competency and
mastery of specific academic subjects.  The following is a list of suggested subject matter
competencies that will continue to be revised and improved.  The competencies are based on
state standards, as well as on in-depth discussions with our school community, on what students
should know and be able to do.

English
In English, students will:
‡ Understand and appreciate literature and the arts as expressions of, and ways to interpret, the
human experience.
‡ Be proficient in academic writing.
‡ Be well-read as demonstrated by reading a wide selection of literary works from different
genres.
‡ Make informed interpretations of the purpose and meaning of literary works.
‡ Convey interpretations of personal experience gleaned from literature.
‡ Explain how literature from various cultural/ethnic groups expresses both distinctive and
similar values, experiences, struggles, and contributions.
‡ Evaluate how the form and content of a literary work contributes to its message and impact.

History
In History, students will:
‡ Recognize that events in the past inform the present.
‡ Understand and apply civic, historical, and geographical knowledge in order to become a
citizen in a diverse world.
‡ Understand the building blocks of a representative government.
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‡ Apply information, concepts, and perspectives from the history of our nation and the history
and development of other nations.
‡ Understand the evolution of early civilizations and the development of new ideas,
institutions, and systems of thought.
‡ Understand the rich and varied achievements of diverse peoples.
‡ Debate public issues which arise in a representative democracy.
‡ Use historical research to ask and answer questions about the past.
‡ Recognize that regions can be defined in cultural, physical, or political terms.
‡ Accurately interpret and summarize information from maps, charts, and graphs.

Math
In Math, students will:
‡ Construct mathematical models.
‡ Use a variety of problem-solving strategies.
‡ Use advanced computing procedures.
‡ Understand and apply advanced properties of numbers.
‡ Understand and apply advanced methods of measurement.
‡ Understand and apply advanced concepts of geometry, functions and algebra, probability,
statistics, and data analysis.

Science
In Science, students will:
‡ Analyze real world phenomena using scientific concepts, principles, and processes.
‡ Use the scientific method to ask and answer questions about the world.
‡ Understand essential ideas about the composition and structure of the universe and the
motions of objects in it.
‡ Know basic concepts in physical sciences, biology, and chemistry.
· Learn the importance of units and careful data collection.
‡ Be acquainted with different lab methodologies through frequent hands-on student
experiences.
Apply algebra to problem solving in science, including but not limited to unit conversions,
measurements, dimensional analysis and the use of significant figures.
‡ Develop critical thinking, measurement and observational skills.
Understand a wide array of introductory inorganic chemistry topics and the associated
introductory laboratory skills.
‡ Learn proper laboratory notebook and record keeping skills in preparation for and modeled
after college/university laboratory courses.
· Grasp science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts.
· Recognize unifying themes that integrate the major topics of biology.
· Apply biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns.
· Satisfy the science standards from the State of California (California State Science
Standards http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/sciencestnd.pdf).

Art
In Art, students will:
‡ Participate in artistic activities.
‡ Make informed interpretations of the purpose and meaning of artistic works.
‡ Convey interpretations of personal experiences in expressive forms.
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‡ Explain how art from various cultural/ethnic groups expresses both distinctive and similar
values, experiences, struggles and contributions.
‡ Explain how the form and content of an artistic work contributes to its message and impact.
‡ Explain the role of the artist in providing service to the community and the world.

Foreign Language
In Foreign Language, students will:
‡ Obtain sufficient verbal fluency and written proficiency to communicate effectively in a
foreign language.
‡ Understand and appreciate the culture of the foreign language.

Technology
In Technology, students will:
‡ Use technology to increase learning.
‡ Understand and use current word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation
software.
‡ Understand the use of the Internet.
‡ Understand how technology can serve the community.
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Lifelong Learning Skills
Students will learn how to pursue their own path of learning throughout their adult lives, so they
may become self-motivated, competent, and lifelong learners through mastery of the following
skills:

Character Development
Students will understand and accept the value of integrity and moral courage in all
aspects of life and learning.

Communication
Students will learn to listen, speak, read, and write as appropriate to the intended
audience in school, at home, or in the community.

Cooperation
Students will learn to work productively with school peers, family members, and
community members in order to complete assigned projects.

Critical Thinking
Students will form a reasonable opinion on matters requiring the active assessment and
comparison of data to be socially aware citizens.

Caring and Respect
Students will learn to accept and demonstrate kindness and appreciation for cultural,
linguistic, and socio-economic differences among peers and community members.

Citizenship
Students will learn to become civically responsible by participating in the School and
community at large.

Conflict Resolution
Students will learn to resolve differences of opinion in a civil and fair manner.

Responsibility
Students will learn to maintain the highest personal standards in studies and citizenship.

Study Skills
Students will learn note-taking strategies, questioning strategies, library research skills,
goal setting, self assessment, time management, and test taking strategies to further ones
own learning.

Technological Literacy
Students will learn the effective and responsible use of technology to enhance learning
and academic performance.
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B.  METHODS TO ASSESS STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD MEETING OUTCOMES
The method by which pupil progress in meeting those pupil out comes is to be measured.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(C)

Student outcome goals described above will be part of a comprehensive evaluation plan
grounded in the belief that a true picture of student learning is only gleaned from a variety of
differentiated assessments.  Traditional standardized evaluations will be coupled with both
formal and informal assessment tools to provide Tassajara Prep educators, parents, and the
students with an in-depth picture of the students¶ depth and breadth of achievement.

Assessment Assumptions
Assessments for individual students should focus on a students growth towards a proficiency
standard rather than comparing a students performance against other students.  Tassajara Prep
will measure a students progress towards attaining the outcomes devariety ofscr ibed above in a
ways including, but not limited to, the following:

· Authentic assessment ± personal portfolios, public exhibitions, and etc.
· Demonstration of skills/knowledge ± essays, oral presentations, and etc.
· State-sanctioned and/or required testing, including performance-based assessments
such as CAHSSE, CAT-6, SAB/2, CST, and CELDT.
· Results on the State Board of Education (SBE) designated Physical Fitness Test
(PFT) for students in California public schools.
· Parent-teacher conferences.
· Project completion.
· Field experience.
· Use of tutorials.
· Unit testing.
· Group participation.

School Performance Criteria
There will be a close relationship between a student’s goal/content standard and the procedure(s)
used to assess it.  Assessment procedures and content are designed to meet individual student
needs.  Some individual modifications may include:

· Identifying individual learning styles and designing assessments to elicit a variety of
thinking and application skills.
· Using a variety of people (e.g., family, employers, other professionals, etc.) in the
assessment process.
· Using technology for presentation of assessment and student response.
· Allowing for a variety of assessment environments that take into consideration the
purpose of the assessment and the student’s unique needs, so the optimal assessment
environment may be chosen.

Assessments include evaluation by teachers, advisors, parents/guardians, and the students
themselves; all of whom are considered to be stakeholders in the students success by
Tassajara Prep.  This objective can only be achieved through a collaborative effort and mutual
respect among the stakeholders.

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Assessments help to build standards, examine teaching practices, and identify curriculum
issues.  Assessment information becomes meaningful only when it reflects something we
value.  The key question at the core of any evaluation is:  Are students learning what we want
them to learn?

Assessment Tools
Subject Area Rubrics
Faculty will create subject area rubrics (humanities, math, science, foreign language, visual and
performing arts, technology, and physical education) that outline standards by grade level and
establish benchmarks and performance indicators for the individual courses taught at Tassajara
Prep.  Students will be assessed against these rubrics consistently in order to measure their
progress.

Grade Scale
GPA will be based on a 4.0 scale (A=4).  One extra point will be added for each A, B, or C grade
from approved Honors, Advanced Placement, or transferable college courses, such that an A will
equal five points.

Grading Criteria ± Major subject areas
A For this reporting period, the student has mastered the standards with
creativity, depth, and complexity and has achieved an average of
90% to 100%.
B For this reporting period, the student has mastered the standards and
has achieved an average of 80% to 89%.
C For this reporting period, the student has learned most of the
standards and has achieved an average of 70% to 79%.
D For this reporting period, the student has not met the standards and
has achieved an average of less than 70%.
F For this reporting period, the student has not met the standards and
has achieved an average of less than 60%.

Report Card
All Tassajara Prep students are assessed four times per year on our school-wide quarterly report
card.  The report card includes grades, information about progress toward standards, and
narrative comments.  In this way, Tassajara Prep continually gives students and families
information about student progress toward our own and State achievement standards.

Standardized Tests
Students at Tassajara Prep will participate in all state-mandated standardized assessments.  These
tests will provide additional information about the extent to which students are mastering key
subject-area concepts and skills as reflected in the state standards.  In addition to offering insight
about the students progress, these tests give us information about our Schools effectiveness
with our population as a whole and wit-gh significroups.  We anaant sublyze this data annually
in order to review our success and make adjustments to our program.

Senior Institute
As part of the graduation requirements, students are required to present the results of their Senior
Projects at the Senior Exhibition to demonstrate, in a variety of ways, their mastery of the
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knowledge required for graduation and progress towards acquiring those skills enumerated under
the Lifelong Learning S sectkil.io l n

Community Service
Tassajara Prep students will fulfill community service requirements each year.  Through this
requirement and the accompanying documentation, we will measure their progress towards
mastery of leadership skills and citizenship within their community.

C.  USE AND REPORTING OF DATA
The evaluation plan will assess what students know and how students apply their knowledge.
The plan will also promote and support assessment and evaluation on the part of all stakeholders
including the students, staff, and parents.  The charts below display a summary of the student and
school outcomes described earlier in Element A ± Measurable Outcom and tes´heir respective
assessment methods.  Consistent and calibrated rubrics to measure student performance will be
developed as part of the evaluation plan.

MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES

School Outcome Goals Assessment
Mastery of school-wide outcomes of
critical thinking, communication,
Portfolio and/or exhibitions
personal responsibility, and social
responsibility
State and national standardized tests,
Proficiency in reading and writing writing assessments, essay exams,
portfolios, and exhibitions
Varied written, oral, and standardized
Subject Matter Competencies tests, exhibitions, portfolio, and lab
assessments
Student completion of required
Official transcript and authentic
coursework and related activities for
assessments
admission to the UC and CSU systems
Essays, journals, portfolios, exhibitions,
Mastery of Life Skills peer reviews, community reviews, and
performance evaluations.
Documentation of a faculty-approved
Mastery of Leadership Skills
community service project
Completion of Senior Project Documented results of a senior project
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MEASURABLE SCHOOL OUTCOMES

School Outcome Goals Assessment
Aggregate progress on the individual
Progress in aggregated pupil outcomes
pupil outcomes
Compare standardized test scores (CST,
Student improvement on standardized
CAT/6, CAHSEE, CELDT, SABE2) to
tests
comparable schools
Compile Tassajara Prep attendance
Consistently high attendance rate records and compare them to those from
other schools in California
Lower student dropout rate, expulsions, Compare with rates in chartering district
and referrals to continuation schools
Improve overall score (on a scale of 200-
1000) on standardized exams, annual
Meet or exceed Academic Performance growth targets, subgroup scores, and
Index (API) growth targets statewide rankings as determined by the
Tri-Valley Learning Corporation Board

Programmatic Report
The assessments are designed to be aligned with the mission, exit outcomes, and the curriculum
described in the Charter.  Tassajara Prep will collect annual data from the assessments listed
above and will use the data to identify areas for improvement in the educational program.  Based
on the data compiled, the School will generate an annual performance report that includes:

· Summary data showing student progress toward the goals and outcomes from
assessment instruments and techniques as described in Appendix B: Academic Program.

· An analysis of whether student performance is meeting the outcomes specified by this
section.  These data will be displayed on both a Charter school-wide basis and
disaggregated by major racial and ethnic categories to the extent feasible without
compromising student confidentiality.

· A record of any health or safety occurrences during the year, their disposition, and any
policy or other actions taken in response.

· Data regarding the number of staff working at the school and their qualifications.

· Data on the level of parent involvement in the School’s governance (and other aspects of
the school, if applicable) and summary data from an annual parent and student
satisfaction survey.
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· An overview of the School’s admissions practices during the year.  This overview will
include data on the number of enrolled students from the waiting list and the number of
expelled and/or suspended students.

· Information demonstrating whether the School implemented the means listed in the
Charter to achieve a racially and ethnically balanced student population.

· A summary of major decisions and policies established by the Board during the year.

· Analyses of the effectiveness of the School’s internal and external dispute-resolution
mechanisms and data on the number and resolution of disputes and complaints.

· Other information regarding the educational program and the administrative, legal, and
governance operations of the School relative to general compliance with the terms of the
Charter.

The School and the District will also jointly develop an annual site visitation process and
protocol in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to enable the grantor to gather
information needed to confirm the school’s performance and compliance with the terms of this
charter.  Tassajara Prep agrees to and submits to the right of the District to make random visits
and inspections in order to carry out its statutorily required oversight.

Pursuant to Education Code Section 47604.3, Tassajara Prep will promptly respond to all
reasonable inquiries regarding its financial and other public records from the District, the County
Office of Education, and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The annual programmatic report will be mailed to the address of record of all staff and families
within 90 days of the end of the prior fiscal year.  The School Accountability Report Card
(SARC) will be posted annually as re quired by law.

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IV.  GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE
The governance structuthe scre hool inclof uding, but not limited to, the process to be followed by the school to
ensure parental involv ement.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(D)

A.  NONPROFIT PUBLIC BENEFIT CORPORATION
Tassajara Preparatory High School shall be operated by the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation
(TVLC).  TVLC was formed as a California non-profit public benefit corporation pursuant to
California law and has had its 501(c)(3) status recognized by the Internal Revenue Service.  The
School shall be governed pursuant to its adopted bylaws as subsequently amended from time to
time, which shall be consistent with this charter.

The School shall operate autonomously from the District, with the exception of the supervisory
oversight and special education services as required by statute.  Pursuant to the Education Code
Section 47604(c), the District shall not be liable for the debts and obligations of Tassajara Prep
and for claims arising from the performance of acts, errors, or omissions by the Charter School,
as long as the granting authority has complied with all oversight responsibilities required by law.

See Appendix O ± Tri-Valley Learning Corporation Bylaws for additional information.

B.  TRI-VALLEY LEARNING CORPORATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
The Board of Directors will operate Tassajara Prep.  Board members have a responsibility to
receive input from the Schools families, staff, and interested community members regarding
issues of significance and to weigh the input and opinions carefully before taking action. The
TVLC Board is responsible for adopting a budget for each school it manages and for adopting
policies and procedures for implementation of the Charter. The Board may choose, in accordance
with its bylaws, to increase its membership depending upon the workload of the corporation. A
majority of the directors must be elected by the TVLC parents and guardians as site
board representatives. Others may be appointed by the Board from the community as provided in
the TVLC bylaws. The TVLC Board will hold ultimate responsibility for the operation of the
School, its compliance with applicable laws and regulations, its financial soundness, and the
execution of its mission.

The Board has adopted policies and procedures regarding self-management and conflicts of
interest. The TVLC Board of Directors may initiate and carry out any program or activity that is
consistent and not in conflict with any law and the purposes for which charter schools are
established. The Board may execute any powers delegated to it by law, shall discharge any duty
imposed by law upon it, and may delegate to an employee of the corporation any of those duties.
The Board, however, retains ultimate responsibility over the performance of those powers or
duties so delegated. The Board will receive proper training annually in effective board practices
in accordance with all applicable state laws.

C.  CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER
The Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the TVLC oversees the operational and fiscal areas of the
corporation and plays a leading role in shaping and executing the corporations strategic and
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operational plans.  The COO will manage TVLC operational activities in fulfillment of the
schools missions as described in their charters.  The COO will ensure that the corporations
business activities are managed effectively in compliance with charter school regulations and
applicable education law, corporate code, and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
(GAAP).  The COO will work with the TVLC Board, the site boards, the Chief Academic
Officer, the Principals, and its committees to ensure that the corporation makes sound strategic
decisions.  The COO will serve as the key spokesperson for TVLC with the community, local
and state government agencies, and the charter school movement.

D.  CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER
The Chief Academic Officer (CAO) of the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation oversees the
educational activities of the corporation and plays a leading role in executing the corporations
strategic and academic vision.  The CAO will manage TVLC educational activities in fulfillment
of the schools missions as state.  The CAd in theiO r cwillhar ensuters re that the corporations
educational activities are managed effectively in compliance with charter school regulations and
applicable education law.  The CAO will work with the TVLC Board, the COO, the site boards,
the Principals, and its committees to ensure that the corporation makes sound strategic decisions.
E.  ACCOUNTING MANAGER
The Accounting Manager will ensure that the corporation operates in fulfillment with the
mission as stated in the charters and in compliance with California charter school law, education
law, tax law, and labor law.  All accounting functions must follow GAAP, Financial Accounting
Standards Board (FASB), and Not-For-Profit standards and regulations.

F.  PRINCIPAL
The Tassajara Prep Principal is the instructional leader at Tassajara Prep and will oversee the
design and implementation of educational activities at the School.  The principal will be
responsible for implementing TVLC Board policies and developing all appropriate procedures
that will support policy implementation.  Additionally, the principal shall recruit, train, and
evaluate the Tassajara Prep teaching and support staff.

See Appendix Q ± Tri-Valley Learning Corporation Organizational Chart and Appendix P
± Job Descriptions for additional details.

G.  FAMILY PARTICIPATION
Family involvement in the education process is one of the most important elements of student
success; therefore, Tassajara Prep will use family and community volunteers to enhance and
extend all aspects of the Schools eduParecatnts wiion progll be asked to becomram.  e active
participants in their childrens education, not only through engagement with teachers on
expectations and performance, but also as volunteers who assist across the whole breadth of
school operations.  Tassajara Prep will actively ensure that meaningful volunteer opportunities
are available outside normal working day hours so that all school families can participate in
some way if they choose.
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V.  HUMAN RESOURCES
The qualifications to be met by individuals to be emp loyed by the school.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(E)

A.  EMPLOYEE QUALIFICATIONS
Tri-Valley Learning Corporation shall recruit professional, effective, and qualified personnel
who believe in the instructional philosophy outlined in its vision statement for all administrative,
instructional, instructional support, and non-instructional support capacities.  In accordance with
Education Code 47605(d)1, TVLC shall be nonsectarian in its employment practices and all
other operations.  Tassajara Preparatory High School shall not discriminate against any
individual (employee or pupil) on the basis of ethnicity, national origin, gender or disability.  All
Tassajara Prep employees shall be employees of TVLC.

All employees should possess the personal characteristics, knowledge base, and/or relevant
experiences in the responsibilities and qualifications identified in the posted job description as
determined by the School.

Principal
The Principal supervises the campus teachers and non-instructional staff.  The Principal shall act
as the instructional leader at Tassajara Prep and shall be responsible for helping Tassajara Prep
students achieve outcomes as outlined in the Educational Program.

Candidates for this position will possess:
‡ Excellent communication and comm-building skunitillsy
‡ Administrative exp erience
‡ Extensive knowledge of curriculu m development
‡ A record of success ideveloping tn eachers
‡ Experience in performance  assessment

This individual must meet all of the following minimum requirements:
‡ Valid California Administrative Credenti al or equivalent
‡ Vali Californida Teaching Credential or equivalent
‡ Possession o a Mafsters Degree o r higher

Teachers
Tassajara Prep shall comply with Education Code Section 47605(l), which states in pertinent
part:

Teachers in charter schools shall hold a Commission on Teacher Credentialing certificate,
permit or other document equivalent to that which a teacher in other public schools would
be required to hold.  These documents shall be maintained on file at the Charter School
and shall be subject to periodic inspection by chartering authority.  It is the intent of the
Legislature that charter schools be given flexibility with regard to non-core, non-college
preparatory courses.  Core Teaching Faculty, as providers of the day-to-day teaching and
guidance to the students, are the primary resources of the School.  In a school culture that
promotes academic rigor and success for all students, grade level core teachers are
responsible for, but not limited to:
Tassajara Preparatory High School  33 August 1, 2011
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· Core subject instruction in mathematics, language arts, science, and history/social
studies
· Curriculum planning
· Collaboration with fellow faculty and administrators
· Student assessment
· Communication with parents

Candidates for these positions will possess:
‡ A commitment to students and learning
‡ Knowledge about their subject material
‡ A willingness to be innovative and dynamic in their instruction methods

Accordingly, these core teachers must meet all of the following minimum requirements as
defined by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB):
‡ A Bachels Degreeor
‡ A valid State credential or have an Intern Certificate/Credential for no more than three
years while actively working toward completion of their State credential
‡ Demonstrated core academic subject matter competence

TVLC further stipulates that any hired individual will be required to convert out-of-state
credentials to equivalent California credentials within a reasonably determined amount of time.
Educators in non-core classes, defined as those who are providing specialized learning
opportunities, including options for physical education, fine and performing arts, or foreign
language instruction, will have subject matter expertise, professional experience, and the
demonstrated ability to engage learners participatcesion is as den thterminee educatid onal pro
by Tassajara Prep and meet any applicable requirements of the NCLB legislation.

All employees shall be fingerprinted and successfully pass all the mandatory background checks
as required by the California Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigations.  TVLC
will be using LiveScan to fleulfillgally mandat theseed bac kground checks.  TVLC
administrators may require additional background checks in order to safeguard the health and
safety of Tassajara Prepsstude nts, faculty, and staff, as long as these checks are permitted by
law.

In accordance with applicable law, Tassajara Prep reserves the right to recruit, interview, and
hire anyone at anytime who has the best qualifications to fill any of its position vacancies.

B. RETIREMENT BENEFITS
The manner by which staff members of the chawill rter schbe covered bools y the State teachers
Retirement System, the Public Employees Retirement System o r federal social security.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(K)

All full-time employees of Tassajara Prep shall participate in a qualified retirement plan
including, but not limited to, State Teachers Retirement System (STRS), Public Employees
Retirement System (PERS), the federal social security system, or other alternate qualified
plans as applicable to their positions.  All part-time staff will participate in the federal social
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security system.  Staff at Tassajara Prep may have access to other school sponsored retirement
plans according to policies developed by the TVLC Board and adopted as the Schools employee
policies.

C.  EMPLOYEE REPRESENTATION
A declaration whether or not the charter school shall be deemed the exclusive public school employer of
the employees of the charter school for the purposes of the Educatio nal Employment Relations Act
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(O)

TVLC shall be deemed the exclusive public school employer of the employees at Tassajara Prep
for the purposes of Educational Employment Relat ions Act (³EERA).

Persons employed by TVLC are not considered employees of the District for any purposes
whatsoever.  TVLC maintains full responsibility and liability for hiring and retention purposes
for all of its employees.

D.  RIGHTS OF SCHOOL EMPLOYEES
A description of the rights of any employee of the school district upnt of the on leaving the employme
school district to work in a charter school and of any rights of return to the school district after
employment at a charter sc hool.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(M)

Employees of the District who choose to leave the employment of the District to work in the
Charter School shall have no automatic rights of return to the District after employment at
Tassajara Prep unless specifically granted by the District through a leave of absence or other
agreement of the District as aligned with the collective bargaining agreements of the District.

All Tassajara Prep employees shall be considered the exclusive employees of TVLC and not
Dublin Unified School District, unless otherwise mutually agreed in writing.  Neither sick or
vacation leave nor years of service credit at DUSD or any other school district shall be
transferred to TVLC.

As provided in Section V of this charter, Tassajara Prep shall be the exclusive public school
employer for purposes of the Educational Employment Relations Act (EERhusA);, the  t
collective bargaining contracts of DUSD shall not be controlling.

E.  HEALTH AND SAFETY
The procedures that the school will follow to ensure the health  Th andese  safety of pupils and staff.
procedures shall include the requirement that each employee of the school furnish the school with a
criminal record summary as described in  Section 44237.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(F)

Tassajara Prep will adopt and implement full health and safety procedures and risk management
policies at our school site in consultation with its insurance carriers and risk management
experts.  The following is a summary of the health and safety policies of Tassajara Prep:

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Procedures for Background Checks
TVLC Employees and contractors will be required to submit to a criminal background check and
finish a criminal record summary as required by Ed. Code 44237 and 45125.1.  New employees
not possessing a valid California Teaching Credential must submit two sets of fingerprints to the
California Department of Justice for the purpose of obtaining a criminal record summary.  The
COO/CAO and the Schools Principal shall monitor compliance with th is policy and report to the
TVLC Board of Directors as needed.  The COO/CAO shall monitor the fingerprinting and
background clearance of the Principal.  The TVLC Board President shall monitor the
fingerprinting and background clearance of the COO/CAO.

Volunteers who will volunteer on campus and will have interaction with and/or access to
Tassajara Prep students will be fingerprinted and receive background clearance prior to
volunteering.

Role of Staff as Mandated Child Abuse Reporters
All TVLC employees will be mandated child abuse reporters and will follow all applicable
reporting laws.

TB Testing
Tassajara Prep will follow the requirement of Education Code Section 49406 in requiring
tuberculosis testing of all employees.

Immunizations
Tassajara Prep will adhere to all laws related to legally required immunizations for entering
students pursuant to Health and Safety Code Section 120325-120375, and Title 17, California
Code of Regulations Section 6000-6075.

CPR /First Aid Training
All employees will be trained and certified in CPR/First Aid prior to the commencement of their
first year of employment.  All employees will also be required to maintain that certification for
as long as they are employees of TVLC.

Medication in School
Tassajara Prep will adhere to Education Code Section 49423 regarding administration of
medication in school.

Vision /Hearing/Scoliosis
Tassajara Prep will adhere to Education Code Section 49450 et. seq. as applicable to the grade
levels served by the School.

Emergency Preparedness
Tassajara Prep will adhere to an Emergency Preparedness Plan drafted specifically to the needs
of the school site.  This plan will include, but not be limited to, fire, flood, earthquake, terrorist
threats, and hostage situations.

Drug Free/Alcohol Free/Smoke Free Environment
Tassajara Prep will maintain a drug-free, alcohol-free, and smoke-free environment.

Tassajara Preparatory High School  36 August 1, 2011
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Bloodborne Pathogens
Tassajara Prep will meet state and federal standards for dealing with bloodborne pathogens and
other potentially infectious materials in the work place.  The TVLC Board will establish a
written infectious control plan designed to protect employees and students from possible
infection due to contact with bloodborne viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus
(HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV).   exposeWd to blood or othenher bodily fluids through
injury or accident, students and staff shall follow the latest medical protocol for disinfecting
procedures.

Integrated Complaint and Investigation Procedure
Tassajara Prep will adopt a comprehensive complaint and investigation procedure to centralize
all complaints and concerns coming into the Charter School.  Under the direction of the TVLC
Board, the COO/CAO shall be responsible for investigation, remediation, and follow-up on
matters submitted to Tassajara Prep through this procedure.

Facility Safety
Tassajara Prep will comply with Education Code Section 47610 by either utilizing facilities that
are compliant with the Field Act or facilities that are compliant with the State Building Code.
The School agrees to test sprinkler systems, fire extinguishers, and fire alarms annually at its
facilities to ensure that these systems are maintained in an operable condition at all times.  The
School shall conduct fire drills monthly and, if at District facilities, do so in conjunction with the
District.

Comprehensive Sexual Harassment Policies and Procedures
Tassajara Prep is committed to providing a school that is free from sexual harassment, as well as
any harassment based upon such factors as race, religion, creed, color, national origin, ancestry,
age, medical condition, marital status, sexual orientation, or disability.  Tassajara Prep will adopt
a comprehensive policy to prevent and immediately remediate any concerns about sexual
discrimination or harassment at the School.  Employee-to-employee, employee-to-student, and
student-to-employee misconduct of this nature is very serious and will be addressed in
accordance with the Charter School policy.

Procedures
TVLC shall adopt procedures to implement the policy statements listed above.
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VI. DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCESS, OVERSIGHT, REPORTING,
AND RENEWAL
The procedures to be followed by the charter school and the entity granting the charter to resolve
disputes relating to provisions o f the charter.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(N)

A. INTENT
The intent of this dispute resolution process is to (1) resolve disputes within the school pursuant
to Tassajara Preparatory High Schools policies, (2) minimize the oversight burden on the
District, and (3) ensure a fair and timely resolution to disputes.

B. PUBLIC COMMENTS
Tassajara Prep staff, the Tri-Valley Learning Corporation Board members, and the District agree
to attempt to resolve all disputes regarding this Charter pursuant to the terms of this section.  All
parties shall refrain from public commentary regarding any disputes until the matter has
progressed through the dispute resolution process.

C. DISPUTES ARISING FROM WITHIN THE SCHOOL
Disputes arising from within the School, including all disputes among and between students,
staff, parents, volunteers, advisors, partner organizations, and governing board members of
Tassajara Prep, shall be resolved pursuant to policies and processes developed by the School.

D. DISPUTES INVOLVING TASSAJARA PREP AND/OR TRI-VALLEY LEARNING
CORPORATION AND/OR DUBLIN UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Tassajara Prep and the District will always attempt to resolve any disputes between them
amicably and reasonably without resorting to formal procedures.

Revocation of the Charter may be commenced by the District Board of Education in accordance
with Education Code Section 47607 or applicable law.

In the event that Tassajara Prep and the District have disputes regarding the terms of this charter
or any other issue regarding the School and thebo Dthist parricties agtree to s relationship,
follow the process outlined below.

1. In the event of a dispute between the Charter School and the District, the Charter School
and the District agree to frame the issue in written format (dispute statefirst and ment)
refer the issue to the COO/CAO of the Charter School and the Superintendent of the
District.  In the event that the District Board of Trustees believes that the dispute relates
to an issue that could lead to revocation of the charter in accordance with Education Code
Section 47607, this possibility shall be noted in the written dispute statement; however,
participation in the dispute resolution procedures outlined in this section shall not be
interpreted to impede or serve as a pre-requisite to the Districtsocee abd wiilitth y to pr
revocation in accordance with Education Code Section 47607.

2. The COO/CAO and the Superintendent shall informally meet and confer in a timely
fashion to attempt to resolve the dispute no later than 5 business days from receipt of the
dispute statement.  In the event that this informal meeting fails to resolve the dispute,
both parties shall identify two Board members from their respective boards to meet
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jointly with the COO/CAO of the Charter School and the Superintendent of the District to
resolve the dispute within 15 business days from receipt of the dispute statement.  If this
joint meeting fails to resolve the dispute, the COO/CAO and the Superintendent shall
meet to identify jointly a neutral third party mediator to engage the Parties in a mediation
session designed to facilitate dispute resolution.  The format of the mediation session
shall be developed jointly by the COO/CAO and the Superintendent.  Mediation shall be
held within sixty business days from receipt of the dispute statement.  The costs of the
mediator shall be split equally between the Charter School and the District.  If mediation
does not resolve the dispute, either party may pursue any other remedy available under
the law.  All timelines in this section may be revised upon mutual written agreement of
the Charter School and the District.

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VII. STUDENT ADMISSIONS, ATTENDANCE & SUSPENSION ±
EXPULSION POLICIES

A.  STUDENT ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Admission requirements, if applica  – California Education Code ble.Section 47605(b)(5)(H)

Tassajara Preparatory High School shall strive, through recruitment and admissions practices, to
achieve a racial and ethnic balance among its pupils that is reflective of the general population
residing within the territorial jurisdiction of the Dublin Unified School District.  Students shall
be considered for admission without regard to ethnicity, national origin, gender, disability, or
sexual orientation.

The School shall strive to achieve a student population who understand and value the School’s
mission and vision statements and are committed to the School’s instructional and operational
philosophy from the City of Dublin.  Students who are currently under an expulsion from a
public school may not enroll in the School until the expulsion term is documented as completed.
These students must complete the rehabilitation plan created by the former school or District or
one created by Tassajara Prep on behalf of the students before they may become eligible for
enrollment.

Tassajara Prep shall admit all students who wish to enroll in the School subject only to capacity.
If there are more applicants than capacity, in any grade level, admission to Tassajara Prep, except
for returning students to the School, shall be determined by public random drawing.  Preference
for enrollment shall be given in order of priority according to Tassajara Prep policy as follows:

1) Students returning from the previous year

2) Siblings of currently enrolled students at Tassajara Prep*

3) Children of the paid staff at Tassajara Prep (not to exceed 10%)*

4) Residents of areas served by the DUSD

5) Continuing students from a Tri-Valley Learning Corporation school*

6) Siblings of currently enrolled students at a Tri-Valley Learning Corporation school*

7) Other California residents

* During periods of funding under the Public Charter School Grant program (PCSGP),
this preference will not be implemented.

The open application period will commence in the fall of the prior year.  If more students apply
than can be admitted, in accordance with Education Code Section 47605(d), a public random
drawing shall be held to select students for admission or placement on the waiting list.
Continuing students, returning for the following year, will receive preferential admission and
will not be subject to a public random drawing.
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When a drawing is necessary after an enrollment period has ended, it shall be conducted in
accordance with the preference groups established herein, beginning with a drawing for all
applicants who are members of the highest preference group that cannot be entirely
accommodated within the available vacancies.  A waiting list of applicants at each grade level
shall be maintained to fill vacancies that occur during the school year.  Any applicant that has
filed false information on any form in order to gain entrance to Tassajara Prep will not be
admitted, and any of their siblings and/or relatives who have gained admission through the
sibling priority pencere as statedfer in this charmay be disenrter, olled from Tassajara Prep
after an opportunity to appear and present before the TVLC Board.

B.  MEANS TO ACHIEVE RACIAL/ETHNIC BALANCE REFLECTIVE OF DISTRICT
The means by which the school will al andchi ethnic balaeve a rance aciamong its pupils that is
reflective of the general population residing within the territorial jurisdiction of the school district to
which the charter petition is sub  – California mitted.Educa´tion Code Section 47605(b)(5)(G)

Tassajara Prep will implement a strategy that includes, but is not necessarily limited to, the
following elements or strategies which focus on achieving and maintaining a racial and ethnic
balance among students that is reflective of the general population residing within the Dublin
community:

· An enrollment process that is scheduled and adopted to include a timeline that allows for a
broad-based application process.

· The development and distribution of promotional and informational material that reaches out
to all of the various racial and ethnic groups represented in the territorial jurisdiction of
DUSD.

· Outreach activities including, but not limited to:

1. Public and private communication with DUSD schools.
2. Press releases and other communications with local print, online, and broadcast news
media.
3. Posting of notices or banners in libraries and other public buildings and spaces, as well as
with local businesses and religious institutions.

See Appendix F ± Community Outreach Plan for additional information.

C.  ATTENDANCE ALTERNATIVES
The public school attendance alternatives for pupils residing within the school district who choose not
to attend charter s  -cho Calolifornia s.Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(L)

Students who choose not to attend Tassajara Prep may attend their schools in the school district
where they reside or pursue an inter-district transfer in accordance with existing enrollment and
transfer policies of their district or county of residence.  Parents or guardians of each pupil
enrolled in Tassajara Prep will be informed that the pupil has no right to admission in a particular
school of any local educational agency or a particular program of any local education agency as a
consequence of enrollment in Tassajara Prep, except to the extent that such a right is extended by
the local education agency.
Tassajara Preparatory High School  41 August 1, 2011
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D.  PUPIL SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION
The procedures by which pupils can be suspen ded or expelled.´
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(J)

Tassajara Prep acknowledges the responsibility of each student, parent, volunteer, faculty, staff,
and administrator to contribute to the wellbeing of the community by demonstrating
responsibility and accountability for individual and group actions.  Tassajara Prep strives to
enhance the quality of relationships, the quality of learning, and the quality of the community
through shared responsibility.  The purpose of discipline at Tassajara Prep is to:

‡ Promote genuine pupil character development.
‡ Inculcate respect of authority.
‡ Assist in the growth of self-discipline.
‡ Provide an orderly atmosphere conducive to learning.

The TVLC Board has developed a comprehensive suspension and expulsion policy and
procedure.  The suspension and expulsion policy will be printed and distributed to the Tassajara
Prep community.  The policy will clearly describe the Schools academic and behavioral
expectations regarding attendance, work habits, harassment, substance abuse, violence, and
safety among others.  School discipline will be addressed during orientation and all students,
parents, and guardians will be asked to verify that they have reviewed and understand the
policies and procedures.

Any student who engages in repeated violations of Tassajara Prep academic or behavioral
expectations may be required to attend a meeting with the Tassajara Prep staff and the students
parent/guardian.  The School may prepare a specific, written remediation agreement outlining
future student conduct expectations, timelines, and consequences for failure to meet the
expectations.  These consequences may include, but are not limited to, suspension or expulsion.
The Principal may discipline and ultimately suspend or recommend expulsion to the TVLC
Board for students who fail to comply with the terms of the remediation agreement.  Students
who present an immediate threat to the health and safety of Tassajara Preps student body and
staff may also be immediately suspended and later expelled by the Board upon recommendation
of the Principal.  The Schools policies will provide all students with due process and will be
developed to conform to all applicable state and federal laws relating to the discipline of students
with exceptional needs prior to beginning instruction.

The School will notify the District of any expulsions and will include suspension and expulsion
data in its annual performance report.

In preparing the lists of enumerated suspension and expulsion offenses and procedures, TPHS
has reviewed the lists of offenses and procedures that apply to students attending non-charter
public schools.  TPHS believes their proposed lists of enumerated offenses and procedures
provide adequate safety for students, staff, and visitors to the school and serve the best interests
the school’s pupils and their parents (guardians).

See Appendix I ± Draft Suspension and Expulsion Policies for additional information.
Tassajara Preparatory High School  42 August 1, 2011
————————————— 43

VIII. REPORTING AND ACCOUNTABILITY
The manner in which an annual, independent, financial audit shall be conducted, which shall
employ generally accepted accounting principles, and the manner in which audit exceptions and
deficiencies shall be resolved to the satisfaction of the chartering authorit y.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(I)

A.  BUDGET AND CASH FLOW
A multi-year financial plan for the Tassajara Preparatory High School is based on available data
and detailed in:

See Appendix R ± Fiscal Plan for additional information.

B.  FINANCIAL REPORTING
Tassajara Prep shall provide financial reports and any other requested fiscal reports to Dublin
Unified School District as follows:

1. By July 1, a preliminary budget for the current fiscal year.  For a charter school in its
first year of operation, financial statements submitted with the charter petition
pursuant to Education Code 47605(g) will satisfy this requirement.
2. By December 15, an interim financial report for the current fiscal year reflecting
changes through October 31.  Additionally, on December 15, a copy of the Charter
Schools annual, independent financial audit report for the preceding fiscal year shall
be delivered to the District, State Accounting Manager, State Department of
Education, and County Superintendent of Schools.
3. By March 15, a second interim financial report for the current fiscal year reflecting
changes through January 31.
4. By September 15, a final unaudited report for the full prior year.  The report
submitted to the District shall include an annual statement of all the Charter Schools
receipts and expenditures for the preceding fiscal year.

C.  INSURANCE
Tassajara Prep shall acquire and finance general liability, workers compensation, and other
necessary insurance of the types and in the amounts required for an enterprise of similar purpose
and circumstance.  The DUSD Board of Education shall be named as an additional insured on all
policies of the Charter School.  Prior to opening, Tassajara Prep shall provide evidence of the
above insurance coverage to the District.

D.  ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
Governing Law: The manner in which administrative services of the School are to be provided.
– Education Code Section 47605(g)

The COO/CAO of Tri-Valley Learning Corporation will assume the lead responsibility for
administering Tassajara Prep under the policies adopted by the TVLC Board of Directors.
Tassajara Prep anticipates that TVLC will provide or procure most of its own administrative
services including, but not limited to, financial management, personnel, and instructional
Tassajara Preparatory High School  43 August 1, 2011
————————————— 44

program development.  TVLC may, however, be interested in discussing fee-for-service
arrangements for services provided by the District if available.

E.  FACILITIES
Governing Law: The facilities to be utilized by the school.  The description of facilities to be used by the
charter school shall specify where the school intends to locate.
– Education Code Section 47605.6(b)(5)(D)

Tassajara Prep desires to operate on one site within DUSD boundaries.  Tassajara Prep shall
discuss with DUSD the specific terms, rights, and responsibilities related to the location of the
School on a DUSD facility pursuant to Education Code Section 47614 and its implementing
regulations.

F.  FINANCIAL AUDIT
The manner in which an annual, independent, financial audit shall be conducted, which shall employ
generally accepted accounting principles, and the manner in which audit exceptions and deficiencies
shall be resolved to the satisfaction of the chartering authority.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(I)

The TVLC Board shall select an independent financial auditor from the list approved by the
State Accounting Managers Office and oversee  audit requirements.

An annual audit of the books and records of Tassajara Prep and TVLC shall be conducted as
required under the Charter Schools Act, section 47605(b)(5)(I).  The books and records of
Tassajara Prep and TVLC shall be kept in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting
Principles and as required by applicable law.

The auditor shall have, at a minimum, a CPA, documented experience in auditing educational
institutions, and be on the State Accounting Managers Office list To the  of approved auditors.
extent required under applicable federal law, the audit scope shall be expanded to include items
and processes specified in applicable Office of Management and Budget Circulars.

Tassajara Prep anticipates that the annual audit will be completed within four months of the close
of the fiscal year and that a copy of the auditor’s findings will be forwarded to the District,
Alameda County Superintendent of Schools, State Board of Education, the State Accounting
th
Manager, and to the California Department of Education (CDE) by December 15 each year.
The COO/CAO will review any audit exceptions or deficiencies and report to the TVLC Board
with recommendations on how to resolve them.  The TVLC Board will submit a report to the
District describing how the exceptions and deficiencies have been or will be resolved to the
satisfaction of the District.  The independent fiscal audit of Tassajara Prep is a public record to
be provided to the public upon request.

G.  CLOSURE PROTOCOL
A description of the procedures toed if the charte be usr school closes.  The procedures shall ensure a
final audit of the school to determine the disposition of all assets and liabilities of the charter school,
including plans for disposing of any net assets and for maintenance a nd transfer of pupil records.
– California Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(P)

Tassajara Preparatory High School  44 August 1, 2011
————————————— 45

The following procedures shall apply in the event Tassajara Prep closes, regardless of the reason
for closure.

Closure of the School shall be documented by official action of the TVLC Board.  The action
shall identify the reason for closure.  The TVLC Board shall promptly notify the District, within
10 business days, of the closure and the effective date of the closure.

The TVLC Board shall ensure notification to the parents and students of Tassajara Prep
regarding the closure and provide information to assist parents and students in locating suitable
alternative programs.  This notice shall be provided promptly, within 10 business days, by U.S.
Mail, following the TVLC Boards decision to close te, he scthe schohool shaol.  As applll icabl
transfer all appropriate student records to either DUSD or the Alameda County Office of
Education.  If both are unwilling to store such records, these records will be sent back to the
students district of residence and shall otassist students in therransferwise ring to their next
school.  All transfers of student records shall be made in compliance with the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), 20 U.S .C. 1232g.

As soon as reasonably practical, Tassajara Prep shall prepare final financial records.  Tassajara
Prep shall also have an independent audit completed as soon as reasonably practical and
generally no more than six months after closure.  Tassajara Prep shall pay for the final audit.
The audit shall be prepared by an auditor selected by the TVLC Board from the list approved by
the State Accounting Managers Office and shall be provided to the District promptly upon
completion.  The purpose of the audit is to determine the net assets or net liabilities of Tassajara
Prep.  The assessment will include an accounting of all Tassajara Prep assets, including cash,
accounts receivable, and an inventory of property, equipment, and supplies.  It will also include
an accounting of the School’s liabilities including any accounts receivable, which may include
reduction in apportionments as a result of audit findings or other investigations, loans, and
unpaid staff compensation.  The audit should also assess the disposition of any restricted funds
received by or due to Tassajara Prep.

In addition to a final audit, Tassajara Prep shall also submit any required year-end financial
reports to the CDE and the authorizing entity in the form and time frame required.  These reports
should be submitted as soon as possible after the closure action, but no later than the required
deadline for reporting, for the fiscal year.

On closure of the School, all assets of Tassajara Prep, including, but not limited to, all
leaseholds, tangible and intangible personal properties, all ADA apportionments, and other
revenues generated by students attending the school remain the sole property of TVLC and shall
be distributed in accordance with the TVLC articles of incorporation and applicable law upon
dissolution of the School.  On closure, TVLC shall remain responsible for satisfaction of all
liabilities arising from the operation of Tassajara Prep.

Since TVLC is organized as a nonprofit public benefit corporation under California law, the
TVLC Board shall follow the provisions set forth in the California Corporations Code for the
dissolution of a nonprofit public benefit corporation, and shall file all necessary filings with the
appropriate state and federal agencies.

Tassajara Preparatory High School  45 August 1, 2011
————————————— 46

IX. IMPACT ON THE DISTRICT
Governing Law: Potential civil liability effects, if any, upon the school and upon the District
— Education Code Section 47605(g).

A.  POTENTIAL CIVIL LIABILITY EFFECTS

Intent
This statement is intended to fulfill the terms of Education Code Section 47605(g) and provides
information regarding the proposed operation and potential effects of Tassajara Preparatory High
School on Dublin Unified School District.

Civil Liability
Tri-Valley Learning Corporation shall be operated as a California non-profit public benefit
corporation.  TVLC is organized and operated exclusively for charitable purposes within the
meaning of Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code and California Revenue and
Taxation Code Section 23701d.

The central objective of the corporation is to provide public education for residents of the State
of California, in accordance with the Charter Schools Act, California Education Code Section
46700, et seq.

As such, in accordance with Education Code Section 47604(c), if the District complies with all
oversight responsibilities required by law, the District shall not be liable for the debts or
obligations of TVLC or for claims arising from the performance of acts, errors, or omissions by
TVLC.

Further, TVLC and DUSD shall enter into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which
shall provide for indemnification of the District.

The corporate bylaws of TVLC shall provide for indemnification of Tassajara Prep Board of
Directors, officers, agents, and employees, and TVLC will purchase general liability insurance to
secure against financial risks.  DUSD shall be named as an additional insured on the TVLC
general liability insurance covering Tassajara Prep.  The TVLC Board of Directors will institute
appropriate risk management practices, including screening of employees, establishing codes of
conduct for students, staff, and participating families, and procedures governing financial
transactions and dispute resolution.

Tassajara Preparatory High School  46 August 1, 2011
————————————— 47

X. CONCLUSION

By approving this charter, the Dublin Unified School District will be fulfilling the intent of the
Charter Schools Act of 1992 to improve student learning; increase learning opportunities for all
students, with special emphasis on expanded learning opportunities for those students identified
as academically low achieving; create new professional opportunities for teachers; and provide
parents and students with expanded choices in education and following the directive of law to
encourage the creation of charter schools.  The Petitioners are eager to work independently, yet
cooperatively, with the District to set the highest standard for what a charter school should and
can be.  To this end, the Petitioners pledge to work cooperatively with the District to answer any
concerns over this document and to present the District with the strongest possible proposal for
approval of a five-year charter to begin in the fall of 2012.  The Charter School shall be
considered approved as of the date of charter approval.  The term of the charter shall expire on
June 30, 2017.

Tassajara Preparatory High School  47 August 1, 2011

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